I use Spring Boot with Spring Security and Cors Support.

If I execute following code

url = 'http://localhost:5000/api/token'
xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest
xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = ->
    if xmlhttp.readyState is 4
        console.log xmlhttp.status
xmlhttp.open "GET", url, true
# xmlhttp.setRequestHeader "X-Requested-With", "XMLHttpRequest"
xmlhttp.setRequestHeader 'Authorization', 'Basic ' + btoa 'a:a'
do xmlhttp.send

I get as a result

200

If I test with wrong credentials like

url = 'http://localhost:5000/api/token'
xmlhttp = new XMLHttpRequest
xmlhttp.onreadystatechange = ->
    if xmlhttp.readyState is 4
        console.log xmlhttp.status
xmlhttp.open "GET", url, true
# xmlhttp.setRequestHeader "X-Requested-With", "XMLHttpRequest"
xmlhttp.setRequestHeader 'Authorization', 'Basic ' + btoa 'a:aa'
do xmlhttp.send

instead of getting 401 (that is the standard code for wrong authentication in spring security) I get

0

with following browser notification:

GET http://localhost:5000/api/token

XMLHttpRequest cannot load http://localhost:5000. No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource. Origin 'http://localhost:3000' is therefore not allowed access. The response had HTTP status code 401.

I'm developing front-end code that needs useful http status codes from server responses to handle the situation. I need something more useful than 0. Also the response body is empty. I dont know if my config is wrong, or it's a software bug and I also don't know where, if it's chromium (using arch linux) or spring security.

My Spring Config is:

@SpringBootApplication
public class Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

@RestController
@RequestMapping("api")
public class Controller {
    @RequestMapping("token")
    @CrossOrigin
    Map<String, String> token(HttpSession session) {
        return Collections.singletonMap("token", session.getId());
    }
}

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfiguration extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {
    @Override
    protected void configure(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth.inMemoryAuthentication().withUser("a").password("a").roles("USER");
    }
    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
                .authorizeRequests()
                .requestMatchers(CorsUtils::isPreFlightRequest).permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and().httpBasic();
    }
}

If I test with curl everything works perfect, I think because no CORS support needed, but I tried to simulate the CORS with OPTION requests and the result was also ok.

$ curl -v localhost:5000/api/token -H "Authorization: Basic YTpha"
*   Trying ::1...
* Connected to localhost (::1) port 5000 (#0)
> GET /api/token HTTP/1.1
> Host: localhost:5000
> User-Agent: curl/7.48.0
> Accept: */*
> Authorization: Basic YTpha
> 
< HTTP/1.1 200 OK
< Server: Apache-Coyote/1.1
< X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff
< X-XSS-Protection: 1; mode=block
< Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
< Pragma: no-cache
< Expires: 0
< X-Frame-Options: DENY
< Access-Control-Allow-Origin: http://localhost:3000
< Access-Control-Allow-Methods: POST,GET,OPTIONS,DELETE
< Access-Control-Max-Age: 3600
< Access-Control-Allow-Credentials: true
< Access-Control-Allow-Headers: Origin,Accept,X-Requested-    With,Content-Type,Access-Control-Request-Method,Access-Control-Request-Headers,Authorization
< x-auth-token: 58e4cca9-7719-46c8-9180-2fc16aec8dff
< Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8
< Transfer-Encoding: chunked
< Date: Sun, 01 May 2016 16:15:44 GMT
< 
* Connection #0 to host localhost left intact
{"token":"58e4cca9-7719-46c8-9180-2fc16aec8dff"}

and with wrong credentials:

$ curl -v localhost:5000/api/token -H "Authorization: Basic YTp"
*   Trying ::1...
* Connected to localhost (::1) port 5000 (#0)
> GET /api/token HTTP/1.1
> Host: localhost:5000
> User-Agent: curl/7.48.0
> Accept: */*
> Authorization: Basic YTp
> 
< HTTP/1.1 401 Unauthorized
< Server: Apache-Coyote/1.1
< X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff
< X-XSS-Protection: 1; mode=block
< Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
< Pragma: no-cache
< Expires: 0
< X-Frame-Options: DENY
< WWW-Authenticate: Basic realm="Realm"
< Content-Type: application/json;charset=UTF-8
< Transfer-Encoding: chunked
< Date: Sun, 01 May 2016 16:16:15 GMT
< 
* Connection #0 to host localhost left intact
{"timestamp":1462119375041,"status":401,"error":"Unauthorized","message":"Failed to decode basic authentication token","path":"/api/token"}

Edit: To avoid misunderstandings. I use 1.3.3 Spring Boot. The Blog post writes:

CORS support will be available in the upcoming Spring Boot 1.3 release, and is already available in the 1.3.0.BUILD-SNAPSHOT builds.

Using controller method CORS configuration with @CrossOrigin annotations in your Spring Boot application does not require any specific configuration.

Global CORS configuration can be defined by registering a WebMvcConfigurer bean with a customized addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry) method:

I have added following code to enable global cors support. actually I have tried this before but it the result was the same. I tried it again recently and the result is the same.

@Configuration
public class MyConfiguration {

    @Bean
    public WebMvcConfigurer corsConfigurer() {
        return new WebMvcConfigurerAdapter() {
            @Override
            public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
                registry.addMapping("/**");
            }
        };
    }
}

The idea, that the problem comes from a redirect between the authorization process is an interesting though. how can i change the redirect to any resources to avoid this conflict?

EDIT:

I guess I am closer to a solution. I have tested with my nodejs server that supports cors without problems by adding Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * to all requests.

Like Stefan Isele has already mentioned it seems that spring security redirects or doesn't add the CORS header so that's why the request seems to be broken. So while spring security is checking the authentification it has to add the proper header.

Does anyone know how to do so?

EDIT:

I found a workaround, that seems to be ugly. I have started a github issue for spring boot where I describe the workaround: https://github.com/spring-projects/spring-boot/issues/5834

10 Answers 10

Spring Security can now leverage Spring MVC CORS support described in this blog post I wrote.

To make it work, you need to explicitly enable CORS support at Spring Security level as following, otherwise CORS enabled requests may be blocked by Spring Security before reaching Spring MVC.

If you are using controller level @CrossOrigin annotations, you just have to enable Spring Security CORS support and it will leverage Spring MVC configuration:

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.cors().and()...
    }
}

If you prefer using CORS global configuration, you can declare a CorsConfigurationSource bean as following:

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.cors().and()...
    }

    @Bean
    CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", new CorsConfiguration().applyPermitDefaultValues());
        return source;
    }
}

This approach supersedes the filter-based approach previously recommended.

You can find more details in the dedicated CORS section of Spring Security documentation.

  • I made CORS+Spring Security work using a CorsFilter bean. For some reason, the FilterRegistrationBean wasn't picked up. – jasonleakey Jun 20 '17 at 22:46
  • hi, i have this: <mvc:cors> <mvc:mapping path="/rest/client/**" allowed-headers="" allowed-methods="GET,PUT,HEAD,OPTIONS,POST,DELETE,PATCH" allowed-origins="" allow-credentials="true" /> </mvc:cors> in my dispatcher-servlet. and this: <cors /> in my security.xml. But when i turn on authentication it is not working. There is no logging. Any clues? – tibi Oct 26 '17 at 13:58
  • Adding that if you use a @RepositoryRestResource, You have to enable it specifically, another way: stackoverflow.com/questions/31724994/… – BenoitParis Jun 3 at 11:11

If you are using Spring Security, you can do the following to ensure that CORS requests are handled first:

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
            // by default uses a Bean by the name of corsConfigurationSource
            .cors().and()
            ...
    }

    @Bean
    CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
        CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
        configuration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("https://example.com"));
        configuration.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("GET","POST"));
        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
        return source;
    }
}

See http://docs.spring.io/spring-security/site/docs/current/reference/html/cors.html for more information.

If you use JDK 8+, there is a one line lambda solution:

@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

@Override
protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
    http.cors().configurationSource(request -> new CorsConfiguration().applyPermitDefaultValues());
}

Cross origin protection is a feature of the browser. Curl does not care for CORS, as you presumed. That explains why your curls are successful, while the browser requests are not.

If you send the browser request with the wrong credentials, spring will try to forward the client to a login page. This response (off the login page) does not contain the header 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' and the browser reacts as you describe.

You must make spring to include the haeder for this login response, and may be for other response, like error pages etc.

This can be done like this :

    @Configuration
    @EnableWebMvc
    public class WebConfig extends WebMvcConfigurerAdapter {

            @Override
            public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
                registry.addMapping("/api/**")
                    .allowedOrigins("http://domain2.com")
                    .allowedMethods("PUT", "DELETE")
                    .allowedHeaders("header1", "header2", "header3")
                    .exposedHeaders("header1", "header2")
                    .allowCredentials(false).maxAge(3600);
            }
     }

This is copied from cors-support-in-spring-framework

I would start by adding cors mapping for all resources with :

registry.addMapping("/**")

and also allowing all methods headers.. Once it works you may start to reduce that again to the needed minimum.

Please note, that the CORS configuration changes with Release 4.2.

If this does not solve your issues, post the response you get from the failed ajax request.

For properties configuration

# ENDPOINTS CORS CONFIGURATION (EndpointCorsProperties)
endpoints.cors.allow-credentials= # Set whether credentials are supported. When not set, credentials are not supported.
endpoints.cors.allowed-headers= # Comma-separated list of headers to allow in a request. '*' allows all headers.
endpoints.cors.allowed-methods=GET # Comma-separated list of methods to allow. '*' allows all methods.
endpoints.cors.allowed-origins= # Comma-separated list of origins to allow. '*' allows all origins. When not set, CORS support is disabled.
endpoints.cors.exposed-headers= # Comma-separated list of headers to include in a response.
endpoints.cors.max-age=1800 # How long, in seconds, the response from a pre-flight request can be cached by clients.
  • 3
    These properties are for Spring Actuator only and don't apply to all endpoints. – His Sep 19 '17 at 4:15

Cors can be a pain in the ass, but with this simple code you are Cors ONLY!!!! to to specified method

@CrossOrigin(origins="*")// in this line add your url and thats is all for spring boot side
    @GetMapping("/some")
    public String index() {
        return "pawned cors!!!!";
    }

Like a charm in spring boot 2.0.2

Found an easy solution for Spring-Boot, Spring-Security and Java-based config:

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
@EnableGlobalMethodSecurity(prePostEnabled = true)
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity httpSecurity) throws Exception {
        httpSecurity.cors().configurationSource(new CorsConfigurationSource() {
            @Override
            public CorsConfiguration getCorsConfiguration(HttpServletRequest request) {
                return new CorsConfiguration().applyPermitDefaultValues();
            }
        });
    }
}

I solved this problem by:

@Configuration
public class CORSFilter extends CorsFilter {

    public CORSFilter(CorsConfigurationSource source) {
        super((CorsConfigurationSource) source);
    }

    @Override
    protected void doFilterInternal(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, FilterChain filterChain)
            throws ServletException, IOException {

        response.addHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Headers",
                "Access-Control-Allow-Origin, Origin, Accept, X-Requested-With, Content-Type, Access-Control-Request-Method, Access-Control-Request-Headers");
        if (response.getHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin") == null)
            response.addHeader("Access-Control-Allow-Origin", "*");
        filterChain.doFilter(request, response);
    }

}

and:

@Configuration
public class RestConfig {

    @Bean
    public CORSFilter corsFilter() {
        CorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        CorsConfiguration config = new CorsConfiguration();
        config.addAllowedOrigin("http://localhost:4200");
        config.addAllowedMethod(HttpMethod.DELETE);
        config.addAllowedMethod(HttpMethod.GET);
        config.addAllowedMethod(HttpMethod.OPTIONS);
        config.addAllowedMethod(HttpMethod.PUT);
        config.addAllowedMethod(HttpMethod.POST);
        ((UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource) source).registerCorsConfiguration("/**", config);
        return new CORSFilter(source);
    }
}

I had the same problem on a methood that returns the status of the server. The application is deployed on multiple servers. So the easiest I found is to add

@CrossOrigin(origins = "*")
@RequestMapping(value="/schedulerActive")
public String isSchedulerActive(){
  //code goes here
}

This method is not secure but you can add allowCredentials for that.

I solved this problem by: `

@Bean
CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
    CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
    configuration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("*"));
    configuration.setAllowCredentials(true);
    configuration.setAllowedHeaders(Arrays.asList("Access-Control-Allow-Headers","Access-Control-Allow-Origin","Access-Control-Request-Method", "Access-Control-Request-Headers","Origin","Cache-Control", "Content-Type", "Authorization"));
    configuration.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("DELETE", "GET", "POST", "PATCH", "PUT"));
    UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
    source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
    return source;
}

`

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.