-2

I have two derived class that inherit from one base class

class Base{
   public:
       virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am base class " << endl:}
       virtual string getName(){ return "base"}
}
class Derived_one : public Base{
   public:
       virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am derived one " << endl:}
       virtual string getName(){ return "one"}
   private:
  vector<Base*> m;
} 
class Derived_two : public Base{
   public:
      virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am derived two " << endl:}
      virtual string getName(){ return "two"}
   private:
  vector<string> str;
}

The Derived_one class contains a vector of object. I defined clone function for each object , which means when i push Derived_two or Derived_one into vector , they will stay as Derived and object slicing wont happen e.g

when i declare print function inside Derived_one class to print the vector e.g

void Derived_one::print(){
   for( size_t i = 0; i < m.size(); i++){
        m[i] -> Greetings()
   }
}

It will nicely prints result based on class that was pushed in.( I the last object was Derived_two it will print "I am derived two" and so on.

The problem is , when i want to print the vector of strings inside Derived_two class, when i change print method into

for( size_t i = 0; i < m.size() ; i++){
   if( m[i] -> getName() == "two" ){
       for( size_t j = 0; j < m[i] -> str.size() ; j++){
           cout << m[i] ->str[j] << endl;
       }
   }
   cout << m[i] ->getName() << endl;
}

It throws error

"Base class does not have member str"

Why is this error happening? The vector should not be inherited from Base class.. Is there a way how to fix it? Thanks.

  • 1
    I don't seen any derivation going on here. How is Derived_one or Derived_two derived from Base? – OldProgrammer May 1 '16 at 21:09
  • What do you mean? – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:09
  • Think about this: how does the compiler know that getName() returning "two" automatically guarantees the object has a str member? And if there's no guarantee, what is it supposed to do with this code? – Jon May 1 '16 at 21:11
  • Sorry about that, i didnt notice it , i fixed it , it wont solve problem – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:11
  • @Jon im quite new to c++ , i have hard time trying to understand this. I have spent few hours googling and so on but didnt find any solution – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:13
2

You can use cast: cast Base objects to Derived_two to access Derived_two attributes. You will also need to make ̀str be public or provide a public getter to it (or use friend)...

But using cast here definitely proves your design is bad. You should use virtual functions to have each derived class specialize the Base class. Don't use a class name (getName()) to discriminate your objects...

As below:

class Base{
   public:
       virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am base class " << endl:}
       virtual string getName(){ return "base"}
       virtual vector<string>* getStr() { return NULL; }
};
class Derived_one : public Base{
   public:
       virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am derived one " << endl:}
       virtual string getName(){ return "one"}
   private:
  vector<Base*> m;
};
class Derived_two : public Base{
   public:
      virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am derived two " << endl:}
      virtual string getName(){ return "two"}
      virtual vector<string>* getStr() { return &str; }
   private:
  vector<string> str;
};

Then do:

for( size_t i = 0; i < m.size() ; i++){
   if( m[i]->getStr() ){
       // that's a Derived_two object, a vector<string> attribue is available
       for( size_t j = 0; j < m[i]->getStr()->size() ; j++){
           cout << (*(m[i]->getStr()))[j] << endl;
       }
   } else [
       // that's a Derived_one or a Base object, no vector<string> is available
   }

   cout << m[i] ->getName() << endl;
}

If you never create any Base objects, you can make the class abstract by adding getStr()as a pure virtual function:

class Base{
       public:
           virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am base class " << endl:}
           virtual string getName(){ return "base"}
           virtual vector<string>* getStr() = 0;
    };
    class Derived_one : public Base{
       public:
           virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am derived one " << endl:}
           virtual string getName(){ return "one"}
           virtual vector<string>* getStr() { return NULL; }
       private:
      vector<Base*> m;
    };
    class Derived_two : public Base{
       public:
          virtual void Greetings(){ cout << " I am derived two " << endl:}
          virtual string getName(){ return "two"}
          virtual vector<string>* getStr() { return &str; }
       private:
      vector<string> str;
    };
  • Altought i have hard time understanding this , it works , thanks – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:38
  • At least you learnt what virtual means ;-) you'll see it again if you do more C++... – jpo38 May 1 '16 at 21:42
  • @ jpo38 yep , btw , the getName() method was also virtual , why didnt it also work? You said about not naming object but it printed right result for the object. Whats the diffrence? – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:54
  • @trolkura: What do you mean by why didnt it also work?. T would have work at runtime, you may discriminate your objects using getName. However, this does not allow you to access derived class attributes... – jpo38 May 1 '16 at 21:56
0

In your code, m[i] is of type Base*, so you need to explicitly downcast from Base to Derived_two to gain access to members which are only known in Derived_two:

for( size_t i = 0; i < m.size() ; i++){
    if( m[i] -> getName() == "two" ){
        Derived_two * d = static_cast<Derived_two*>(m[i]);
        for( size_t j = 0; j < d -> str.size() ; j++){
            cout << d ->str[j] << endl;
        }
    }
    cout << m[i] ->getName() << endl;
}
  • Now it complains about str vector being private – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:20
  • OK, you could make Derived_two a friend class of Derived_one, but that stinks. – Johan Boulé May 1 '16 at 21:25
  • Yea it propably wouldn be good idea :) – Darlyn May 1 '16 at 21:26
  • cast should be avoided when possible. virtual functions would produce a better design. – jpo38 May 1 '16 at 21:32

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