238
a = [1,2,3,4,5]
b = [1,3,5,6]
c = a and b
print c

actual output: [1,3,5,6] expected output: [1,3,5]

How can we achieve a boolean AND operation (list intersection) on two lists?

  • 7
    The problem here is that a and b works like the following statement from the documentation mentions it: "The expression x and y first evaluates x; if x is false, its value is returned; otherwise, y is evaluated and the resulting value is returned." – Tadeck Dec 6 '11 at 9:52

11 Answers 11

405

If order is not important and you don't need to worry about duplicates then you can use set intersection:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> b = [1,3,5,6]
>>> list(set(a) & set(b))
[1, 3, 5]
| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    what if a = [1,1,2,3,4,5] and b = [1,1,3,5,6] then the intersection is [1,1,3,5] but by above method it will result in only one 1 i.e. [1, 3, 5] what will be the write way to do it then? – Nitish Kumar Pal Oct 10 '18 at 5:18
  • 8
    @NItishKumarPal intersection is commonly understood to be set based. You are looking for a slightly different animal - and you may need to do that manually by sorting each list and merging the results - and keeping dups in the merging. – javadba Jan 6 '19 at 18:51
  • 1
    @MarkByers This will not have duplicates afaict. – javadba Jan 6 '19 at 21:53
96

Using list comprehensions is a pretty obvious one for me. Not sure about performance, but at least things stay lists.

[x for x in a if x in b]

Or "all the x values that are in A, if the X value is in B".

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    this seems the most pythonic which keeps order. not sure why this isn't upvoted higher!! thx for the great solution! – Bill D Mar 1 '18 at 6:15
  • 21
    This is an O(n^2) solution, whereas the solutions above are O(n) – nareddyt Jan 28 '19 at 22:26
  • 5
    @nareddyt - make b a set and you will have O(n) – jcchuks Aug 21 '19 at 15:16
  • 3
    @jcchuks The advantage of this solution is if you need to retain duplicates. If you can be sure of uniqueness, then an O(n) set solution would be better. However, if duplicates are not possible, why is the OP even talking about lists to begin with? The notion of list intersection is a mathematical absurdity – demongolem Nov 26 '19 at 12:07
  • It's actually linear, not squared :/ membership checks can be faster, this way of writing leaves it up to the compiler. (sort/hashtable b, get o(1) checks...) – Lodewijk Sep 23 at 19:00
71

If you convert the larger of the two lists into a set, you can get the intersection of that set with any iterable using intersection():

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
b = [1,3,5,6]
set(a).intersection(b)
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Is this any different than list(set(a) & set(b)) – user1767754 Jul 3 '17 at 19:21
  • 3
    why does it matter which list gets converted to set (assuming n != m)? what's the advantage of only converting one to set? – 3pitt Jun 12 '18 at 20:14
  • 1
    Seems like this would be faster – Nathan Sep 26 '18 at 21:40
31

Make a set out of the larger one:

_auxset = set(a)

Then,

c = [x for x in b if x in _auxset]

will do what you want (preserving b's ordering, not a's -- can't necessarily preserve both) and do it fast. (Using if x in a as the condition in the list comprehension would also work, and avoid the need to build _auxset, but unfortunately for lists of substantial length it would be a lot slower).

If you want the result to be sorted, rather than preserve either list's ordering, an even neater way might be:

c = sorted(set(a).intersection(b))
| improve this answer | |
  • This is almost certainly slower than the accepted answer but has the advantage that duplicates are not lost. – tripleee Oct 22 '19 at 3:54
20

Here's some Python 2 / Python 3 code that generates timing information for both list-based and set-based methods of finding the intersection of two lists.

The pure list comprehension algorithms are O(n^2), since in on a list is a linear search. The set-based algorithms are O(n), since set search is O(1), and set creation is O(n) (and converting a set to a list is also O(n)). So for sufficiently large n the set-based algorithms are faster, but for small n the overheads of creating the set(s) make them slower than the pure list comp algorithms.

#!/usr/bin/env python

''' Time list- vs set-based list intersection
    See http://stackoverflow.com/q/3697432/4014959
    Written by PM 2Ring 2015.10.16
'''

from __future__ import print_function, division
from timeit import Timer

setup = 'from __main__ import a, b'
cmd_lista = '[u for u in a if u in b]'
cmd_listb = '[u for u in b if u in a]'

cmd_lcsa = 'sa=set(a);[u for u in b if u in sa]'

cmd_seta = 'list(set(a).intersection(b))'
cmd_setb = 'list(set(b).intersection(a))'

reps = 3
loops = 50000

def do_timing(heading, cmd, setup):
    t = Timer(cmd, setup)
    r = t.repeat(reps, loops)
    r.sort()
    print(heading, r)
    return r[0]

m = 10
nums = list(range(6 * m))

for n in range(1, m + 1):
    a = nums[:6*n:2]
    b = nums[:6*n:3]
    print('\nn =', n, len(a), len(b))
    #print('\nn = %d\n%s %d\n%s %d' % (n, a, len(a), b, len(b)))
    la = do_timing('lista', cmd_lista, setup) 
    lb = do_timing('listb', cmd_listb, setup) 
    lc = do_timing('lcsa ', cmd_lcsa, setup)
    sa = do_timing('seta ', cmd_seta, setup)
    sb = do_timing('setb ', cmd_setb, setup)
    print(la/sa, lb/sa, lc/sa, la/sb, lb/sb, lc/sb)

output

n = 1 3 2
lista [0.082171916961669922, 0.082588911056518555, 0.0898590087890625]
listb [0.069530963897705078, 0.070394992828369141, 0.075379848480224609]
lcsa  [0.11858987808227539, 0.1188349723815918, 0.12825107574462891]
seta  [0.26900982856750488, 0.26902294158935547, 0.27298116683959961]
setb  [0.27218389511108398, 0.27459001541137695, 0.34307217597961426]
0.305460649521 0.258469975867 0.440838458259 0.301898526833 0.255455833892 0.435697630214

n = 2 6 4
lista [0.15915989875793457, 0.16000485420227051, 0.16551494598388672]
listb [0.13000702857971191, 0.13060092926025391, 0.13543915748596191]
lcsa  [0.18650484085083008, 0.18742108345031738, 0.19513416290283203]
seta  [0.33592700958251953, 0.34001994132995605, 0.34146714210510254]
setb  [0.29436492919921875, 0.2953648567199707, 0.30039691925048828]
0.473793098554 0.387009751735 0.555194537893 0.540689066428 0.441652573672 0.633583767462

n = 3 9 6
lista [0.27657914161682129, 0.28098297119140625, 0.28311991691589355]
listb [0.21585917472839355, 0.21679902076721191, 0.22272896766662598]
lcsa  [0.22559309005737305, 0.2271728515625, 0.2323150634765625]
seta  [0.36382699012756348, 0.36453008651733398, 0.36750602722167969]
setb  [0.34979605674743652, 0.35533690452575684, 0.36164689064025879]
0.760194128313 0.59330170819 0.62005595016 0.790686848184 0.61710008036 0.644927481902

n = 4 12 8
lista [0.39616990089416504, 0.39746403694152832, 0.41129183769226074]
listb [0.33485794067382812, 0.33914685249328613, 0.37850618362426758]
lcsa  [0.27405810356140137, 0.2745978832244873, 0.28249192237854004]
seta  [0.39211201667785645, 0.39234519004821777, 0.39317893981933594]
setb  [0.36988520622253418, 0.37011313438415527, 0.37571001052856445]
1.01034878821 0.85398540833 0.698928091731 1.07106176249 0.905302334456 0.740927452493

n = 5 15 10
lista [0.56792402267456055, 0.57422614097595215, 0.57740211486816406]
listb [0.47309303283691406, 0.47619009017944336, 0.47628307342529297]
lcsa  [0.32805585861206055, 0.32813096046447754, 0.3349759578704834]
seta  [0.40036201477050781, 0.40322518348693848, 0.40548801422119141]
setb  [0.39103078842163086, 0.39722800254821777, 0.43811702728271484]
1.41852623806 1.18166313332 0.819398061028 1.45237674242 1.20986133789 0.838951479847

n = 6 18 12
lista [0.77897095680236816, 0.78187918663024902, 0.78467702865600586]
listb [0.629547119140625, 0.63210701942443848, 0.63321495056152344]
lcsa  [0.36563992500305176, 0.36638498306274414, 0.38175487518310547]
seta  [0.46695613861083984, 0.46992206573486328, 0.47583580017089844]
setb  [0.47616910934448242, 0.47661614418029785, 0.4850609302520752]
1.66818870637 1.34819326075 0.783028414812 1.63591241329 1.32210827369 0.767878297495

n = 7 21 14
lista [0.9703209400177002, 0.9734041690826416, 1.0182771682739258]
listb [0.82394003868103027, 0.82625699043273926, 0.82796716690063477]
lcsa  [0.40975093841552734, 0.41210508346557617, 0.42286920547485352]
seta  [0.5086359977722168, 0.50968098640441895, 0.51014018058776855]
setb  [0.48688101768493652, 0.4879908561706543, 0.49204087257385254]
1.90769222837 1.61990115188 0.805587768483 1.99293236904 1.69228211566 0.841583309951

n = 8 24 16
lista [1.204819917678833, 1.2206029891967773, 1.258256196975708]
listb [1.014998197555542, 1.0206191539764404, 1.0343101024627686]
lcsa  [0.50966787338256836, 0.51018595695495605, 0.51319599151611328]
seta  [0.50310111045837402, 0.50556015968322754, 0.51335406303405762]
setb  [0.51472997665405273, 0.51948785781860352, 0.52113485336303711]
2.39478683834 2.01748351664 1.01305257092 2.34068341135 1.97190418975 0.990165516871

n = 9 27 18
lista [1.511646032333374, 1.5133969783782959, 1.5639569759368896]
listb [1.2461750507354736, 1.254518985748291, 1.2613379955291748]
lcsa  [0.5565330982208252, 0.56119203567504883, 0.56451296806335449]
seta  [0.5966339111328125, 0.60275578498840332, 0.64791703224182129]
setb  [0.54694414138793945, 0.5508568286895752, 0.55375313758850098]
2.53362406013 2.08867620074 0.932788243907 2.76380331728 2.27843203069 1.01753187594

n = 10 30 20
lista [1.7777848243713379, 2.1453688144683838, 2.4085969924926758]
listb [1.5070111751556396, 1.5202279090881348, 1.5779800415039062]
lcsa  [0.5954139232635498, 0.59703707695007324, 0.60746097564697266]
seta  [0.61563014984130859, 0.62125110626220703, 0.62354087829589844]
setb  [0.56723213195800781, 0.57257509231567383, 0.57460403442382812]
2.88774814689 2.44791645689 0.967161734066 3.13413984189 2.6567803378 1.04968299523

Generated using a 2GHz single core machine with 2GB of RAM running Python 2.6.6 on a Debian flavour of Linux (with Firefox running in the background).

These figures are only a rough guide, since the actual speeds of the various algorithms are affected differently by the proportion of elements that are in both source lists.

| improve this answer | |
11
a = [1,2,3,4,5]
b = [1,3,5,6]
c = list(set(a).intersection(set(b)))

Should work like a dream. And, if you can, use sets instead of lists to avoid all this type changing!

| improve this answer | |
  • If a and b are large then this is faster than other answers – javadba Jan 6 '19 at 18:53
6

A functional way can be achieved using filter and lambda operator.

list1 = [1,2,3,4,5,6]

list2 = [2,4,6,9,10]

>>> list(filter(lambda x:x in list1, list2))

[2, 4, 6]

Edit: It filters out x that exists in both list1 and list, set difference can also be achieved using:

>>> list(filter(lambda x:x not in list1, list2))
[9,10]

Edit2: python3 filter returns a filter object, encapsulating it with list returns the output list.

| improve this answer | |
  • Please use the edit link to explain how this code works and don't just give the code, as an explanation is more likely to help future readers. See also How to Answer. source – Jed Fox Mar 29 '17 at 14:17
  • 1
    With Python3, this returns a filter object. You need to say list(filter(lambda x:x in list1, list2)) to get it as a list. – Adrian W Jul 13 '19 at 20:07
1

This is an example when you need Each element in the result should appear as many times as it shows in both arrays.

def intersection(nums1, nums2):
    #example:
    #nums1 = [1,2,2,1]
    #nums2 = [2,2]
    #output = [2,2]
    #find first 2 and remove from target, continue iterating

    target, iterate = [nums1, nums2] if len(nums2) >= len(nums1) else [nums2, nums1] #iterate will look into target

    if len(target) == 0:
            return []

    i = 0
    store = []
    while i < len(iterate):

         element = iterate[i]

         if element in target:
               store.append(element)
               target.remove(element)

         i += 1


    return store
| improve this answer | |
1

It might be late but I just thought I should share for the case where you are required to do it manually (show working - haha) OR when you need all elements to appear as many times as possible or when you also need it to be unique.

Kindly note that tests have also been written for it.



    from nose.tools import assert_equal

    '''
    Given two lists, print out the list of overlapping elements
    '''

    def overlap(l_a, l_b):
        '''
        compare the two lists l_a and l_b and return the overlapping
        elements (intersecting) between the two
        '''

        #edge case is when they are the same lists
        if l_a == l_b:
            return [] #no overlapping elements

        output = []

        if len(l_a) == len(l_b):
            for i in range(l_a): #same length so either one applies
                if l_a[i] in l_b:
                    output.append(l_a[i])

            #found all by now
            #return output #if repetition does not matter
            return list(set(output))

        else:
            #find the smallest and largest lists and go with that
            sm = l_a if len(l_a)  len(l_b) else l_b

            for i in range(len(sm)):
                if sm[i] in lg:
                    output.append(sm[i])

            #return output #if repetition does not matter
            return list(set(output))

    ## Test the Above Implementation

    a = [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89]
    b = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
    exp = [1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13]

    c = [4, 4, 5, 6]
    d = [5, 7, 4, 8 ,6 ] #assuming it is not ordered
    exp2 = [4, 5, 6]

    class TestOverlap(object):

        def test(self, sol):
            t = sol(a, b)
            assert_equal(t, exp)
            print('Comparing the two lists produces')
            print(t)

            t = sol(c, d)
            assert_equal(t, exp2)
            print('Comparing the two lists produces')
            print(t)

            print('All Tests Passed!!')

    t = TestOverlap()
    t.test(overlap)

| improve this answer | |
0

If, by Boolean AND, you mean items that appear in both lists, e.g. intersection, then you should look at Python's set and frozenset types.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can also use a counter! It doesn't preserve the order, but it'll consider the duplicates:

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> b = [1,3,5,6]
>>> d1, d2 = Counter(a), Counter(b)
>>> c = [n for n in d1.keys() & d2.keys() for _ in range(min(d1[n], d2[n]))]
>>> print(c)
[1,3,5]
| improve this answer | |

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