1095

I have a shell script with this code:

var=`hg st -R "$path"`
if [ -n "$var" ]; then
    echo $var
fi

But the conditional code always executes, because hg st always prints at least one newline character.

  • Is there a simple way to strip whitespace from $var (like trim() in PHP)?

or

  • Is there a standard way of dealing with this issue?

I could use sed or AWK, but I'd like to think there is a more elegant solution to this problem.

6
  • 3
    Related, if you wanted to trim space on an integer and just get the integer, wrap with $(( $var )), and can even do that when inside double quotes. This became important when I used the date statement and with filenames.
    – Volomike
    Dec 10 '12 at 14:42
  • "Is there a standard way of dealing with this issue?" Yes, use [[ instead of [. $ var=$(echo) $ [ -n $var ]; echo $? #undesired test return 0 $ [[ -n $var ]]; echo $? 1 Apr 26 '16 at 16:08
  • If it helps, at least where am testing it on Ubuntu 16.04. Using the following matches trim in every way: echo " This is a string of char " | xargs. If you however have a single quote in the text you can do the following: echo " This i's a string of char " | xargs -0. Note that I mention latest of xargs (4.6.0) Jul 19 '16 at 16:48
  • The condition isn't true because of a newline as backticks swallow the last newline. This will print nothing test=`echo`; if [ -n "$test" ]; then echo "Not empty"; fi, this however will test=`echo "a"`; if [ -n "$test" ]; then echo "Not empty"; fi - so there must be more than just a newline at the end.
    – Mecki
    Jun 19 '17 at 17:02
  • A="123 4 5 6 "; B=echo $A | sed -r 's/( )+//g';
    – bruziuz
    Jul 17 '18 at 11:25

45 Answers 45

1236

A simple answer is:

echo "   lol  " | xargs

Xargs will do the trimming for you. It's one command/program, no parameters, returns the trimmed string, easy as that!

Note: this doesn't remove all internal spaces so "foo bar" stays the same; it does NOT become "foobar". However, multiple spaces will be condensed to single spaces, so "foo bar" will become "foo bar". In addition it doesn't remove end of lines characters.

22
  • 34
    Nice. This works really well. I have decided to pipe it to xargs echo just to be verbose about what i'm doing, but xargs on its own will use echo by default.
    – Will
    Feb 18 '13 at 18:59
  • 29
    Nice trick, but be carefull, you can use it for one-line string but −by xargs design− it will not just do triming with multi-line piped content. sed is your friend then. Nov 28 '13 at 9:57
  • 27
    The only problem with xargs is that it will introduce a newline, if you want to keep the newline off I would recommend sed 's/ *$//' as an alternative. You can see the xargs newline like this: echo -n "hey thiss " | xargs | hexdump you will notice 0a73 the a is the newline. If you do the same with sed: echo -n "hey thiss " | sed 's/ *$//' | hexdump you will see 0073, no newline.
    – user4401178
    Jan 7 '15 at 4:30
  • 10
    Careful; this will break hard if the string to xargs contains surplus spaces in between. Like " this is one argument ". xargs will divide into four.
    – bos
    Jan 24 '15 at 23:12
  • 85
    This is bad. 1. It will turn a<space><space>b into a<space>b. 2. Even more: it will turn a"b"c'd'e into abcde. 3. Even more: it will fail on a"b, etc.
    – Sasha
    Feb 11 '15 at 23:20
1106

Let's define a variable containing leading, trailing, and intermediate whitespace:

FOO=' test test test '
echo -e "FOO='${FOO}'"
# > FOO=' test test test '
echo -e "length(FOO)==${#FOO}"
# > length(FOO)==16

How to remove all whitespace (denoted by [:space:] in tr):

FOO=' test test test '
FOO_NO_WHITESPACE="$(echo -e "${FOO}" | tr -d '[:space:]')"
echo -e "FOO_NO_WHITESPACE='${FOO_NO_WHITESPACE}'"
# > FOO_NO_WHITESPACE='testtesttest'
echo -e "length(FOO_NO_WHITESPACE)==${#FOO_NO_WHITESPACE}"
# > length(FOO_NO_WHITESPACE)==12

How to remove leading whitespace only:

FOO=' test test test '
FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE="$(echo -e "${FOO}" | sed -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//')"
echo -e "FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE='${FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE}'"
# > FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE='test test test '
echo -e "length(FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE)==${#FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE}"
# > length(FOO_NO_LEAD_SPACE)==15

How to remove trailing whitespace only:

FOO=' test test test '
FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE="$(echo -e "${FOO}" | sed -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//')"
echo -e "FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE='${FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE}'"
# > FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE=' test test test'
echo -e "length(FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE)==${#FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE}"
# > length(FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE)==15

How to remove both leading and trailing spaces--chain the seds:

FOO=' test test test '
FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE="$(echo -e "${FOO}" | sed -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//' -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//')"
echo -e "FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE='${FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE}'"
# > FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE='test test test'
echo -e "length(FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE)==${#FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE}"
# > length(FOO_NO_EXTERNAL_SPACE)==14

Alternatively, if your bash supports it, you can replace echo -e "${FOO}" | sed ... with sed ... <<<${FOO}, like so (for trailing whitespace):

FOO_NO_TRAIL_SPACE="$(sed -e 's/[[:space:]]*$//' <<<${FOO})"
13
  • 64
    To generalize the solution to handle all forms of whitespace, replace the space character in the tr and sed commands with [[:space:]]. Note that the sed approach will only work on single-line input. For approaches that do work with multi-line input and also use bash's built-in features, see the answers by @bashfu and @GuruM. A generalized, inline version of @Nicholas Sushkin's solution would look like this: trimmed=$([[ " test test test " =~ [[:space:]]*([^[:space:]]|[^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]* ]]; echo -n "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}")
    – mklement0
    Jun 10 '12 at 14:05
  • 8
    If you do that often, appending alias trim="sed -e 's/^[[:space:]]*//g' -e 's/[[:space:]]*\$//g'" to your ~/.profile allows you to use echo $SOMEVAR | trim and cat somefile | trim. Mar 19 '13 at 15:59
  • I wrote a sed solution that only uses a single expression rather than two: sed -r 's/^\s*(\S+(\s+\S+)*)\s*$/\1/'. It trims leading and trailing whitespace, and captures any whitespace-separated sequences of non-whitespace characters in the middle. Enjoy! Feb 6 '14 at 17:41
  • @VictorZamanian Your solution does not work if the input contains only whitespace. The two-pattern sed solutions given by MattyV and instanceof me work fine with whitespace only input.
    – Torben
    Apr 9 '14 at 7:38
  • @Torben Fair point. I suppose the single expression could be made conditional, with |, so as to keep it as one single expression, rather than several. Apr 9 '14 at 13:59
433

There is a solution which only uses Bash built-ins called wildcards:

var="    abc    "
# remove leading whitespace characters
var="${var#"${var%%[![:space:]]*}"}"
# remove trailing whitespace characters
var="${var%"${var##*[![:space:]]}"}"   
printf '%s' "===$var==="

Here's the same wrapped in a function:

trim() {
    local var="$*"
    # remove leading whitespace characters
    var="${var#"${var%%[![:space:]]*}"}"
    # remove trailing whitespace characters
    var="${var%"${var##*[![:space:]]}"}"   
    printf '%s' "$var"
}

You pass the string to be trimmed in quoted form. e.g.:

trim "   abc   "

A nice thing about this solution is that it will work with any POSIX-compliant shell.

Reference

17
  • 24
    Clever! This is my favorite solution as it uses built-in bash functionality. Thanks for posting! @San, it's two nested string trims. E.g., s=" 1 2 3 "; echo \""${s%1 2 3 }"\" would trim everything from the end, returning the leading " ". Subbing 1 2 3 with [![:space:]]* tells it to "find the first non-space character, then clobber it and everything after". Using %% instead of % makes the trim-from-end operation greedy. This is nested in a non-greedy trim-from-start, so in effect, you trim " " from the start. Then, swap %, #, and * for the end spaces. Bam!
    – Mark G.
    Nov 12 '14 at 17:04
  • 2
    I haven't found any unwanted side effects, and the main code works with other POSIX-like shells too. However, under Solaris 10, it doesn't work with /bin/sh (only with /usr/xpg4/bin/sh, but this is not what will be used with usual sh scripts).
    – vinc17
    Apr 26 '16 at 11:57
  • 14
    Much better solution than using sed, tr etc., since it's much faster, avoiding any fork(). On Cygwin difference in speed is orders of magnitude. Jul 3 '16 at 9:33
  • 12
    @San At first I was stumped because I thought these were regular expressions. They are not. Rather, this is Pattern Matching syntax (gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/Pattern-Matching.html, wiki.bash-hackers.org/syntax/pattern) used in Substring Removal (tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/string-manipulation.html). So ${var%%[![:space:]]*} says "remove from var its longest substring that starts with a non-space character". That means you are left only with the leading space(s), which you subsequently remove with ${var#... The following line (trailing) is the opposite. Jan 25 '17 at 18:50
  • 23
    This is overwhelmingly the ideal solution. Forking one or more external processes (e.g., awk, sed, tr, xargs) merely to trim whitespace from a single string is fundamentally insane – particularly when most shells (including bash) already provide native string munging facilities out-of-the-box. Aug 14 '18 at 20:44
95

Bash has a feature called parameter expansion, which, among other things, allows string replacement based on so-called patterns (patterns resemble regular expressions, but there are fundamental differences and limitations). [flussence's original line: Bash has regular expressions, but they're well-hidden:]

The following demonstrates how to remove all white space (even from the interior) from a variable value.

$ var='abc def'
$ echo "$var"
abc def
# Note: flussence's original expression was "${var/ /}", which only replaced the *first* space char., wherever it appeared.
$ echo -n "${var//[[:space:]]/}"
abcdef
11
  • 2
    Or rather, it works for spaces in the middle of a var, but not when I attempt to anchor it at the end. Dec 15 '08 at 21:56
  • Does this help any? From the manpage: "${parameter/pattern/string} [...] If pattern begins with %, it must match at the end of the expanded value of parameter."
    – user42092
    Dec 15 '08 at 22:28
  • 3
    They're regex, just a strange dialect.
    – user42092
    Mar 5 '09 at 12:36
  • 17
    ${var/ /} removes the first space character. ${var// /} removes all space characters. There's no way to trim just leading and trailing whitespace with only this construct. Jun 3 '12 at 19:47
  • 1
    Bash “patterns” are regular expressions, only with a different syntax than “POSIX (extended) regular expressions”. You are right in saying that they are incompatible, and that Bash expects them in different places (the former in parameter substitutions, the latter after the =~ operator). As for their expressiveness: with “extended pattern matching operators” (shell option extglob), the only features that POSIX regexps have and Bash patterns lack, are ^ and $ (compare man bash § “Pattern Matching” with man 7 regex).
    – Maëlan
    Mar 24 '19 at 22:44
79

In order to remove all the spaces from the beginning and the end of a string (including end of line characters):

echo $variable | xargs echo -n

This will remove duplicate spaces also:

echo "  this string has a lot       of spaces " | xargs echo -n

Produces: 'this string has a lot of spaces'
5
  • 7
    Basically the xargs removes all the delimiters from the string. By default it uses the space as delimiter (this could be changed by the -d option).
    – rkachach
    Mar 8 '17 at 15:57
  • 4
    This is by far the cleanest (both short and readable) solution.
    – Potherca
    Aug 16 '17 at 7:59
  • Why do you need echo -n at all? echo " my string " | xargs has the same output.
    – bfontaine
    Mar 20 '19 at 9:26
  • echo -n removes the end of line as well
    – rkachach
    Mar 20 '19 at 9:35
  • The cleanest solution Mar 17 at 3:48
65

Strip one leading and one trailing space

trim()
{
    local trimmed="$1"

    # Strip leading space.
    trimmed="${trimmed## }"
    # Strip trailing space.
    trimmed="${trimmed%% }"

    echo "$trimmed"
}

For example:

test1="$(trim " one leading")"
test2="$(trim "one trailing ")"
test3="$(trim " one leading and one trailing ")"
echo "'$test1', '$test2', '$test3'"

Output:

'one leading', 'one trailing', 'one leading and one trailing'

Strip all leading and trailing spaces

trim()
{
    local trimmed="$1"

    # Strip leading spaces.
    while [[ $trimmed == ' '* ]]; do
       trimmed="${trimmed## }"
    done
    # Strip trailing spaces.
    while [[ $trimmed == *' ' ]]; do
        trimmed="${trimmed%% }"
    done

    echo "$trimmed"
}

For example:

test4="$(trim "  two leading")"
test5="$(trim "two trailing  ")"
test6="$(trim "  two leading and two trailing  ")"
echo "'$test4', '$test5', '$test6'"

Output:

'two leading', 'two trailing', 'two leading and two trailing'
3
  • 9
    This will trim only 1 space character. So the echo results in 'hello world ', 'foo bar', 'both sides '
    – Joe
    Jul 14 '14 at 15:33
  • 1
    @Joe I added a better option.
    – wjandrea
    Dec 9 '17 at 2:09
  • 1
    This helped me, but the question specifically asked about a trailing newlin which this does not remove. May 12 at 8:53
46

You can trim simply with echo:

foo=" qsdqsd qsdqs q qs   "

# Not trimmed
echo \'$foo\'

# Trim
foo=`echo $foo`

# Trimmed
echo \'$foo\'
4
  • This collapses multiple contiguous spaces into one. Dec 16 '13 at 6:13
  • 10
    Did you try it when foo contains a wildcard? e.g., foo=" I * have a wild card"... surprise! Moreover this collapses several contiguous spaces into one. Apr 28 '14 at 8:47
  • 5
    This is an excellent solution if you: 1. want no spaces on the ends 2. want only one space between each word 3. are working with a controlled input with no wildcards. It essentially turns a badly formatted list into a good one.
    – musicin3d
    Nov 19 '15 at 15:25
  • Good reminder of the wildcards @gniourf_gniourf +1. Still an excelente solution, Vamp. +1 to you too.
    – DrBeco
    Mar 21 '16 at 1:05
45

From Bash Guide section on globbing

To use an extglob in a parameter expansion

 #Turn on extended globbing  
shopt -s extglob  
 #Trim leading and trailing whitespace from a variable  
x=${x##+([[:space:]])}; x=${x%%+([[:space:]])}  
 #Turn off extended globbing  
shopt -u extglob  

Here's the same functionality wrapped in a function (NOTE: Need to quote input string passed to function):

trim() {
    # Determine if 'extglob' is currently on.
    local extglobWasOff=1
    shopt extglob >/dev/null && extglobWasOff=0 
    (( extglobWasOff )) && shopt -s extglob # Turn 'extglob' on, if currently turned off.
    # Trim leading and trailing whitespace
    local var=$1
    var=${var##+([[:space:]])}
    var=${var%%+([[:space:]])}
    (( extglobWasOff )) && shopt -u extglob # If 'extglob' was off before, turn it back off.
    echo -n "$var"  # Output trimmed string.
}

Usage:

string="   abc def ghi  ";
#need to quote input-string to preserve internal white-space if any
trimmed=$(trim "$string");  
echo "$trimmed";

If we alter the function to execute in a subshell, we don't have to worry about examining the current shell option for extglob, we can just set it without affecting the current shell. This simplifies the function tremendously. I also update the positional parameters "in place" so I don't even need a local variable

trim() {
    shopt -s extglob
    set -- "${1##+([[:space:]])}"
    printf "%s" "${1%%+([[:space:]])}" 
}

so:

$ s=$'\t\n \r\tfoo  '
$ shopt -u extglob
$ shopt extglob
extglob         off
$ printf ">%q<\n" "$s" "$(trim "$s")"
>$'\t\n \r\tfoo  '<
>foo<
$ shopt extglob
extglob         off
6
  • 2
    as you've observed trim() removes leading and trailing whitespace only.
    – GuruM
    Sep 12 '12 at 13:03
  • As mkelement has already noted you need to pass the function parameter as a quoted string i.e. $(trim "$string") instead of $(trim $string). I've updated the code to show the correct usage. Thanks.
    – GuruM
    Sep 18 '12 at 9:57
  • As much as I appreciate knowing about the shell options, I don't think the end result is more elegant than simply doing 2 pattern substitutions
    – sehe
    Nov 1 '16 at 12:33
  • Note that (with a recent enough version of Bash?), you can simplify the mechanism for restoring the option extglob, by using shopt -p: simply write local restore="$(shopt -p extglob)" ; shopt -s extglob at the beginning of your function, and eval "$restore" at the end (except, granted, eval is evil…).
    – Maëlan
    Mar 24 '19 at 22:56
  • Great solution! One potential improvement: it looks like [[:space:]] could be replaced with, well, a space: ${var##+( )} and ${var%%+( )} work as well and they are easier to read.
    – DKroot
    May 25 '20 at 14:41
30

I've always done it with sed

  var=`hg st -R "$path" | sed -e 's/  *$//'`

If there is a more elegant solution, I hope somebody posts it.

8
  • could you explain the syntax for sed?
    – farid99
    Jul 8 '15 at 20:21
  • 2
    The regular expression matches all trailing whitespace and replaces it with nothing. Jul 8 '15 at 20:23
  • 5
    How about leading whitespaces?
    – Qian Chen
    Feb 10 '16 at 6:28
  • This strips all trailing whitespace sed -e 's/\s*$//'. Explanation: 's' means search, the '\s' means all whitespace, the '*' means zero or many, the '$' means till the end of the line and '//' means substitute all matches with an empty string.
    – Craig
    Apr 12 '16 at 12:21
  • In 's/ *$//', why are there 2 spaces before the asterisk, instead of a single space? Is that a typo?
    – Brent212
    Mar 19 '20 at 18:01
27

With Bash's extended pattern matching features enabled (shopt -s extglob), you can use this:

{trimmed##*( )}

to remove an arbitrary amount of leading spaces.

6
  • Terrific! I think this is the most lightweight and elegant solution.
    – dubiousjim
    Jan 27 '11 at 18:50
  • 1
    See @GuruM's post below for a similar, but more generic solution that (a) deals with all forms of white space and (b) also handles trailing white space.
    – mklement0
    Jun 3 '12 at 19:55
  • @mkelement +1 for taking the trouble to rewrite my code snippet as a function. Thanks
    – GuruM
    Sep 21 '12 at 5:20
  • Works with OpenBSD's default /bin/ksh as well. /bin/sh -o posix works too but I'm suspicious. Mar 16 '18 at 19:19
  • Not a bash wizard here; what's trimmed? Is it a built-in thing or the variable that is being trimmed? Mar 30 '18 at 17:51
24

You can delete newlines with tr:

var=`hg st -R "$path" | tr -d '\n'`
if [ -n $var ]; then
    echo $var
done
1
  • 9
    I don't want to remove '\n' from the middle of the string, only from the beginning or end. Dec 15 '08 at 21:48
21
# Trim whitespace from both ends of specified parameter

trim () {
    read -rd '' $1 <<<"${!1}"
}

# Unit test for trim()

test_trim () {
    local foo="$1"
    trim foo
    test "$foo" = "$2"
}

test_trim hey hey &&
test_trim '  hey' hey &&
test_trim 'ho  ' ho &&
test_trim 'hey ho' 'hey ho' &&
test_trim '  hey  ho  ' 'hey  ho' &&
test_trim $'\n\n\t hey\n\t ho \t\n' $'hey\n\t ho' &&
test_trim $'\n' '' &&
test_trim '\n' '\n' &&
echo passed
6
  • 2
    Amazing! Simple and effective! Clearly my favorite solution. Thank you!
    – xebeche
    Aug 2 '12 at 11:21
  • 1
    very ingenious, as it is also extremely an "one liner" helper read -rd '' str < <(echo "$str") thx! Apr 2 '15 at 20:53
  • 2
    The trim() function's parameter is a variable name: see the call to trim() inside test_trim(). Within trim() as called from test_trim(), $1 expands to foo and ${!1} expands to $foo (that is, to the current contents of variable foo). Search the bash manual for 'variable indirection'.
    – flabdablet
    Apr 9 '15 at 12:54
  • 2
    How about this little modification, to support trimming multiple vars in one call? trim() { while [[ $# -gt 0 ]]; do read -rd '' $1 <<<"${!1}"; shift; done; } Jul 3 '16 at 9:37
  • 3
    @AquariusPower there's no need to use echo in a subshell for the one-liner version, just read -rd '' str <<<"$str" will do.
    – flabdablet
    Jul 3 '16 at 19:08
16

There are a lot of answers, but I still believe my just-written script is worth being mentioned because:

  • it was successfully tested in the shells bash/dash/busybox shell
  • it is extremely small
  • it doesn't depend on external commands and doesn't need to fork (->fast and low resource usage)
  • it works as expected:
    • it strips all spaces and tabs from beginning and end, but not more
    • important: it doesn't remove anything from the middle of the string (many other answers do), even newlines will remain
    • special: the "$*" joins multiple arguments using one space. if you want to trim & output only the first argument, use "$1" instead
    • if doesn't have any problems with matching file name patterns etc

The script:

trim() {
  local s2 s="$*"
  until s2="${s#[[:space:]]}"; [ "$s2" = "$s" ]; do s="$s2"; done
  until s2="${s%[[:space:]]}"; [ "$s2" = "$s" ]; do s="$s2"; done
  echo "$s"
}

Usage:

mystring="   here     is
    something    "
mystring=$(trim "$mystring")
echo ">$mystring<"

Output:

>here     is
    something<
6
  • Bah in C this would be way simpler to implement!
    – Nils
    Oct 14 '16 at 10:47
  • Sure. Unfortunately, this is not C and sometimes you want to avoid calling external tools Oct 14 '16 at 11:02
  • To make the code both more readable and copy-past compatible, you could change the brackets to escaped characters: [\ \t]
    – leondepeon
    Jan 21 '17 at 23:06
  • @leondepeon did you try this? I tried when i wrote it and tried again, and your suggestion doesn't work in any of bash, dash, busybox May 26 '20 at 10:19
  • @DanielAlder I did, but as it is already 3 years ago, I can't find the code where I used it. Now however, I'd probably use [[:space:]] like in one of the other answers: stackoverflow.com/a/3352015/3968618
    – leondepeon
    May 26 '20 at 13:10
15

This is what I did and worked out perfect and so simple:

the_string="        test"
the_string=`echo $the_string`
echo "$the_string"

Output:

test
2
  • 1
    I tried two other solution from this question/answer page and only this one worked as expected, keep-it-simple-silly strikes again!!
    – AngryDane
    May 18 at 17:02
  • You could even use process command substitution but I guess that won't work for Bourne Shell Jun 11 at 4:34
13

If you have shopt -s extglob enabled, then the following is a neat solution.

This worked for me:

text="   trim my edges    "

trimmed=$text
trimmed=${trimmed##+( )} #Remove longest matching series of spaces from the front
trimmed=${trimmed%%+( )} #Remove longest matching series of spaces from the back

echo "<$trimmed>" #Adding angle braces just to make it easier to confirm that all spaces are removed

#Result
<trim my edges>

To put that on fewer lines for the same result:

text="    trim my edges    "
trimmed=${${text##+( )}%%+( )}
7
  • 1
    Didn't work for me. The first one printed an untrimmed string. The second threw bad substitution. Can you explain what's going on here?
    – musicin3d
    Nov 19 '15 at 15:23
  • 1
    @musicin3d : this is a site I use frequently that spells out how variable manipulation works in bash search for ${var##Pattern} for more details. Also, this site explains bash patterns. So the ## means remove the given pattern from the front and %% means remove the given pattern from the back. The +( ) portion is the pattern and it means "one or more occurrence of a space"
    – gMale
    Nov 21 '15 at 18:13
  • Funny, it worked in the prompt, but not after transposing to the bash script file.
    – DrBeco
    Mar 21 '16 at 1:03
  • weird. Is it the same bash version in both instances?
    – gMale
    Mar 21 '16 at 19:11
  • @DrBeco #!/bin/sh is not necessarily bash ;) Nov 23 '20 at 8:57
12
# Strip leading and trailing white space (new line inclusive).
trim(){
    [[ "$1" =~ [^[:space:]](.*[^[:space:]])? ]]
    printf "%s" "$BASH_REMATCH"
}

OR

# Strip leading white space (new line inclusive).
ltrim(){
    [[ "$1" =~ [^[:space:]].* ]]
    printf "%s" "$BASH_REMATCH"
}

# Strip trailing white space (new line inclusive).
rtrim(){
    [[ "$1" =~ .*[^[:space:]] ]]
    printf "%s" "$BASH_REMATCH"
}

# Strip leading and trailing white space (new line inclusive).
trim(){
    printf "%s" "$(rtrim "$(ltrim "$1")")"
}

OR

# Strip leading and trailing specified characters.  ex: str=$(trim "$str" $'\n a')
trim(){
    if [ "$2" ]; then
        trim_chrs="$2"
    else
        trim_chrs="[:space:]"
    fi

    [[ "$1" =~ ^["$trim_chrs"]*(.*[^"$trim_chrs"])["$trim_chrs"]*$ ]]
    printf "%s" "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
}

OR

# Strip leading specified characters.  ex: str=$(ltrim "$str" $'\n a')
ltrim(){
    if [ "$2" ]; then
        trim_chrs="$2"
    else
        trim_chrs="[:space:]"
    fi

    [[ "$1" =~ ^["$trim_chrs"]*(.*[^"$trim_chrs"]) ]]
    printf "%s" "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
}

# Strip trailing specified characters.  ex: str=$(rtrim "$str" $'\n a')
rtrim(){
    if [ "$2" ]; then
        trim_chrs="$2"
    else
        trim_chrs="[:space:]"
    fi

    [[ "$1" =~ ^(.*[^"$trim_chrs"])["$trim_chrs"]*$ ]]
    printf "%s" "${BASH_REMATCH[1]}"
}

# Strip leading and trailing specified characters.  ex: str=$(trim "$str" $'\n a')
trim(){
    printf "%s" "$(rtrim "$(ltrim "$1" "$2")" "$2")"
}

OR

Building upon moskit's expr soulution...

# Strip leading and trailing white space (new line inclusive).
trim(){
    printf "%s" "`expr "$1" : "^[[:space:]]*\(.*[^[:space:]]\)[[:space:]]*$"`"
}

OR

# Strip leading white space (new line inclusive).
ltrim(){
    printf "%s" "`expr "$1" : "^[[:space:]]*\(.*[^[:space:]]\)"`"
}

# Strip trailing white space (new line inclusive).
rtrim(){
    printf "%s" "`expr "$1" : "^\(.*[^[:space:]]\)[[:space:]]*$"`"
}

# Strip leading and trailing white space (new line inclusive).
trim(){
    printf "%s" "$(rtrim "$(ltrim "$1")")"
}
11

You can use old-school tr. For example, this returns the number of modified files in a git repository, whitespaces stripped.

MYVAR=`git ls-files -m|wc -l|tr -d ' '`
1
  • 2
    This doesn't trim whitespace from the front and back - it removes all whitespace from the string.
    – Nick
    Dec 6 '13 at 15:28
11

Use AWK:

echo $var | awk '{gsub(/^ +| +$/,"")}1'
2
  • Sweet that seems to work (ex:) $stripped_version=echo $var | awk '{gsub(/^ +| +$/,"")}1'``
    – rogerdpack
    Apr 15 '10 at 18:29
  • 5
    except awk isn't doing anything: echo'ing an unquoted variable has already stripped out whitespace Jun 8 '11 at 10:41
8

I've seen scripts just use variable assignment to do the job:

$ xyz=`echo -e 'foo \n bar'`
$ echo $xyz
foo bar

Whitespace is automatically coalesced and trimmed. One has to be careful of shell metacharacters (potential injection risk).

I would also recommend always double-quoting variable substitutions in shell conditionals:

if [ -n "$var" ]; then

since something like a -o or other content in the variable could amend your test arguments.

2
  • 3
    It is the unquoted use of $xyz with echo that does the whitespace coalescing, not the variable assignment. To store the trimmed value in the variable in your example, you'd have to use xyz=$(echo -n $xyz). Also, this approach is subject to potentially unwanted pathname expansion (globbing).
    – mklement0
    Jun 4 '12 at 4:20
  • this is jut wrong, the value in the xyz variable is NOT trimmed.
    – caesarsol
    Jun 10 '15 at 14:24
8

I would simply use sed:

function trim
{
    echo "$1" | sed -n '1h;1!H;${;g;s/^[ \t]*//g;s/[ \t]*$//g;p;}'
}

a) Example of usage on single-line string

string='    wordA wordB  wordC   wordD    '
trimmed=$( trim "$string" )

echo "GIVEN STRING: |$string|"
echo "TRIMMED STRING: |$trimmed|"

Output:

GIVEN STRING: |    wordA wordB  wordC   wordD    |
TRIMMED STRING: |wordA wordB  wordC   wordD|

b) Example of usage on multi-line string

string='    wordA
   >wordB<
wordC    '
trimmed=$( trim "$string" )

echo -e "GIVEN STRING: |$string|\n"
echo "TRIMMED STRING: |$trimmed|"

Output:

GIVEN STRING: |    wordAA
   >wordB<
wordC    |

TRIMMED STRING: |wordAA
   >wordB<
wordC|

c) Final note:
If you don't like to use a function, for single-line string you can simply use a "easier to remember" command like:

echo "$string" | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//'

Example:

echo "   wordA wordB wordC   " | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//'

Output:

wordA wordB wordC

Using the above on multi-line strings will work as well, but please note that it will cut any trailing/leading internal multiple space as well, as GuruM noticed in the comments

string='    wordAA
    >four spaces before<
 >one space before<    '
echo "$string" | sed -e 's/^[ \t]*//' | sed -e 's/[ \t]*$//'

Output:

wordAA
>four spaces before<
>one space before<

So if you do mind to keep those spaces, please use the function at the beginning of my answer!

d) EXPLANATION of the sed syntax "find and replace" on multi-line strings used inside the function trim:

sed -n '
# If the first line, copy the pattern to the hold buffer
1h
# If not the first line, then append the pattern to the hold buffer
1!H
# If the last line then ...
$ {
    # Copy from the hold to the pattern buffer
    g
    # Do the search and replace
    s/^[ \t]*//g
    s/[ \t]*$//g
    # print
    p
}'
6
  • Note: As suggested by @mkelement it will not work for multi-line string though it should work for single-line strings.
    – GuruM
    Sep 18 '12 at 10:18
  • 1
    You are wrong: it does work on multi-line strings too. Just test it out!:) Sep 18 '12 at 12:36
  • +1 for the usage - made it easy for me to test out the code. However the code still won't work for multi-line strings. If you look carefully at the output, you'll notice that any leading/trailing internal spaces are also getting removed e.g. the space in front of " multi-line" is replaced by "multi-line". Just try increasing the number of leading/trailing spaces on each line.
    – GuruM
    Sep 18 '12 at 14:16
  • Now I see what you mean! Thank you for the head up, I edited my answer. Sep 18 '12 at 15:04
  • @"Luca Borrione" - welcome :-) Would you explain the sed syntax you're using in trim()? It might also help any user of your code to tweak it to other uses. Also it might even help find edge-cases for the regular-expression.
    – GuruM
    Sep 19 '12 at 6:22
7
var='   a b c   '
trimmed=$(echo $var)
1
  • 1
    That won't work if there are more than one space in between any two words. Try: echo $(echo "1 2 3") (with two spaces between 1, 2, and 3).
    – joshlf
    Aug 14 '13 at 22:26
7

This will remove all the whitespaces from your String,

 VAR2="${VAR2//[[:space:]]/}"

/ replaces the first occurrence and // all occurrences of whitespaces in the string. I.e. all white spaces get replaced by – nothing

0
6

Here's a trim() function that trims and normalizes whitespace

#!/bin/bash
function trim {
    echo $*
}

echo "'$(trim "  one   two    three  ")'"
# 'one two three'

And another variant that uses regular expressions.

#!/bin/bash
function trim {
    local trimmed="$@"
    if [[ "$trimmed" =~ " *([^ ].*[^ ]) *" ]]
    then 
        trimmed=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
    fi
    echo "$trimmed"
}

echo "'$(trim "  one   two    three  ")'"
# 'one   two    three'
3
  • The first approach is tricky in that it not only normalizes interior whitespace (replaces all interior spans of whitespace with a single space each) , but is also subject to globbing (pathname expansion) so that, for instance, a * character in the input string would expand to all files and folders in the current working folder. Finally, if $IFS is set to a non-default value, trimming may not work (though that is easily remedied by adding local IFS=$' \t\n'). Trimming is limited to the following forms of whitespace: spaces, \t and \n characters.
    – mklement0
    Jun 4 '12 at 21:53
  • 1
    The second, regular expression-based approach is great and side effect-free, but in its present form is problematic: (a) on bash v3.2+, matching will by default NOT work, because the regular expression must be UNquoted in order to work and (b) the regular expression itself doesn't handle the case where the input string is a single, non-space character surrounded by spaces. To fix these problems, replace the if line with: if [[ "$trimmed" =~ ' '*([^ ]|[^ ].*[^ ])' '* ]]. Finally, the approach only deals with spaces, not other forms of whitespace (see my next comment).
    – mklement0
    Jun 4 '12 at 21:53
  • 2
    The function that utilizes regular expresssions only deals with spaces and not other forms of whitespace, but it's easy to generalize: Replace the if line with: [[ "$trimmed" =~ [[:space:]]*([^[:space:]]|[^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]* ]]
    – mklement0
    Jun 4 '12 at 21:54
6

To remove spaces and tabs from left to first word, enter:

echo "     This is a test" | sed "s/^[ \t]*//"

cyberciti.biz/tips/delete-leading-spaces-from-front-of-each-word.html

0
6

This is the simplest method I've seen. It only uses Bash, it's only a few lines, the regexp is simple, and it matches all forms of whitespace:

if [[ "$test" =~ ^[[:space:]]*([^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]*$ ]]
then 
    test=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
fi

Here is a sample script to test it with:

test=$(echo -e "\n \t Spaces and tabs and newlines be gone! \t  \n ")

echo "Let's see if this works:"
echo
echo "----------"
echo -e "Testing:${test} :Tested"  # Ugh!
echo "----------"
echo
echo "Ugh!  Let's fix that..."

if [[ "$test" =~ ^[[:space:]]*([^[:space:]].*[^[:space:]])[[:space:]]*$ ]]
then 
    test=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
fi

echo
echo "----------"
echo -e "Testing:${test}:Tested"  # "Testing:Spaces and tabs and newlines be gone!"
echo "----------"
echo
echo "Ah, much better."
1
  • 1
    Surely preferable to, for example (ye gods!), shelling out to Python. Except I think it's simpler and more general to correctly handle string that contains only spaces.Slightly simplified expression would be: ^[[:space:]]*(.*[^[:space:]])?[[:space:]]*$
    – Ron Burk
    Apr 10 '17 at 21:58
6

Assignments ignore leading and trailing whitespace and as such can be used to trim:

$ var=`echo '   hello'`; echo $var
hello
2
  • 9
    That's not true. It's "echo" that removes whitespace, not the assignment. In your example, do echo "$var" to see the value with spaces. Feb 9 '12 at 17:41
  • 2
    @NicholasSushkin One could do var=$(echo $var) but I do not recommend it. Other solutions presented here are preferred.
    – xebeche
    Aug 2 '12 at 11:08
5

This does not have the problem with unwanted globbing, also, interior white-space is unmodified (assuming that $IFS is set to the default, which is ' \t\n').

It reads up to the first newline (and doesn't include it) or the end of string, whichever comes first, and strips away any mix of leading and trailing space and \t characters. If you want to preserve multiple lines (and also strip leading and trailing newlines), use read -r -d '' var << eof instead; note, however, that if your input happens to contain \neof, it will be cut off just before. (Other forms of white space, namely \r, \f, and \v, are not stripped, even if you add them to $IFS.)

read -r var << eof
$var
eof
0
4

Python has a function strip() that works identically to PHP's trim(), so we can just do a little inline Python to make an easily understandable utility for this:

alias trim='python -c "import sys; sys.stdout.write(sys.stdin.read().strip())"'

This will trim leading and trailing whitespace (including newlines).

$ x=`echo -e "\n\t   \n" | trim`
$ if [ -z "$x" ]; then echo hi; fi
hi
1
  • while that works, you may want to consider offering a solution that does not involve launching a full python interpreter just to trim a string. It's just wasteful.
    – pdwalker
    Apr 3 '15 at 12:00
4

Removing spaces to one space:

(text) | fmt -su
4

I needed to trim whitespace from a script when the IFS variable was set to something else. Relying on Perl did the trick:

# trim() { echo $1; } # This doesn't seem to work, as it's affected by IFS

trim() { echo "$1" | perl -p -e 's/^\s+|\s+$//g'; }

strings="after --> , <-- before,  <-- both -->  "

OLD_IFS=$IFS
IFS=","
for str in ${strings}; do
  str=$(trim "${str}")
  echo "str= '${str}'"
done
IFS=$OLD_IFS
2
  • 2
    You can easily avoid problems with non-default $IFS values by creating a local copy (which will go out of scope upon exiting the function): trim() { local IFS=$' \t\n'; echo $1; }
    – mklement0
    Jun 2 '12 at 3:17
  • 1
    Related to @mklement0 coment: mywiki.wooledge.org/IFS. The default value of IFS is space, tab, newline. (A three-character string.)...
    – Angel
    Jun 15 at 15:19

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