0

I'm building Linq Extension methods.

Shortly, I've built an extension method in order to create a MemberExpression looks like:

public static Expression Field<T>(this object entity, string field)
{
    Type entityType = entity.GetType();
    PropertyInfo propertyInfo = entityType.GetProperty(field);
    if (propertyInfo == null)
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} doesn't exist on {1}", field, entityType.Name));

    ParameterExpression parameterExpression = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "e");
    return Expression.Property(parameterExpression, propertyInfo);
}

So, I'm able to do that:

IEnumerable<C> classes = this.backend.cs.Where(
    c => c.Field<C>("Matter").EndsWith(string.Empty)<<<<<<<< Compilation error.
);

Since MemberExpression have not EndsWith method, I'm not able to extend this MemberExpression like a String property access like:

IEnumerable<C> classes = this.backend.cs.Where(
    c => c.Matter.EndsWith(string.Empty)
);

Is there some way to do that.

As you are able to figure out I'm trying to get something a bit more complex, Nevertheless, this example is for explaining the situation.

I hope it's enought clear.

Scope

  • My UI is using a backend.
  • This backend have three implementations. Each one of them provides a Linq implementation (Linq collections, NHibernate, custom-made Linq provider).
  • So, my UI is able to work on collections, a database or getting data from our server.

  • I'd like to provide util extension methods like AnyField().

  • So, after digging a bit I'm thinking on two approaches:
    • AnyField() generates an expression tree which is able to be translated by every Linq provider (first answer of this post).
    • Provide a default implementation of Anyfield() for Linq Collections, and then use each Linq provider extension mechanism for handle it. Or, if you are building a Linq Provider, support it on implementation.
2
  • Maybe ((dynamic)c).Matter.EndsWith(string.Empty) will work without any extension method. May 2, 2016 at 8:37
  • I'm assuming you're doing this to work with Entity Framework? Turns out, keeping things in Expression objects is a lot more difficult that you'd expect. There isn't really a neat way to implement EndsWith, since EndsWith as an Expression would need to re-write the expression tree (it would need to traverse the expression body and append itself to the end).
    – Rob
    May 2, 2016 at 8:59

5 Answers 5

2

Okay, so you're getting tripped up on the syntactic sugar that C# provides for you when building ExpressionTrees

Where expects Expression<Func<TObjectType, TReturnType>> or a compiled lambda; Func<TObjectType, TReturnType>.

Your method Field currently only returns an untyped Expression. That means your query is actually returning Expression<Func<TObjectType, Expression>>. That's not right! It should be returning a Expression<Func<TObjectType, string>>! But how do we do that? That would mean our method would have to return a string, but we want to build an expression tree.

To get it working as you're expecting, it's quite a bit more difficult than you would imagine, but that's only because we're so spoiled with the syntactic sugar.

What we actually need to do is write methods which accept lambda methods, and return lambda methods, each one re-writing the body a little bit.

So... what does that look like?

public static Expression<Func<TElementType, object>> Field<TElementType, TReturnType>(this Expression<Func<TElementType, TReturnType>> expr, string field)
{
    Type entityType = expr.Body.Type;
    PropertyInfo propertyInfo = entityType.GetProperty(field);
    if (propertyInfo == null)
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} doesn't exist on {1}", field, entityType.Name));
    ParameterExpression parameterExpression = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "e");

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<TElementType, object>>(
        Expression.Property(parameterExpression, propertyInfo),
        parameterExpression
    );
}

Notice that it's almost the exact same as what you wrote, but we wrap it with Lambda<Func<TElementType, TReturnType>>. And the signature is a bit different too.

Instead of operating on an object, we want to operate on a lambda expression. We also return a lambda expression.

So how do we use it?

var classes = objects.Where(
    ExpressionExtensions.Field<Test, Test>(q => q, "Matter")
);

Great! Now we're passing Expression<Func<Test, string>> to Where, rather than Expression<Func<Test, MemberExpression>>. Making progress.

But that won't compile, and rightly so. We're returning a string, but we're using a filtering method, which requires a bool.

So let's now write EndsWith:

public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> EndsWith<T, TReturnType>(this Expression<Func<T, TReturnType>> expr, string str)
{
    var endsWithMethod = typeof(string).GetMethod("EndsWith", new[] { typeof(string) });
    var newBody = Expression.Call(expr.Body, endsWithMethod, Expression.Constant(str));
    var result = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(newBody, expr.Parameters);
    return result;
}

And using it:

var classes = objects.Where(
    ExpressionExtensions.Field<Test, Test>(q => q, "Matter")
    .EndsWith("A")
);

Which is now compiling! And the expression tree looks like this:

UserQuery+Test[].Where(e => e.Matter.EndsWith("A"))

That's not too pretty, having Field take a redundant lambda, though. Let's add a helper method to make it look prettier:

public static Expression<Func<TElementType, TElementType>> Query<TElementType>(this Expression<Func<TElementType, TElementType>> expr)
{
    return expr;
}

Putting it all together:

void Main()
{
    var objects = new[] { new Test { Matter = "A" } }.AsQueryable();
    var classes = objects.Where(
        ExpressionExtensions.Query<Test>(q => q)
        .Field("Matter")
        .EndsWith("A")
    );
    classes.Expression.Dump();

}

public class Test
{
    public string Matter { get; set;}
}

public static class ExpressionExtensions
{
    public static Expression<Func<TElementType, TElementType>> Query<TElementType>(this Expression<Func<TElementType, TElementType>> expr)
    {
        return expr;
    }

    public static Expression<Func<TElementType, object>> Field<TElementType, TReturnType>(this Expression<Func<TElementType, TReturnType>> expr, string field)
    {
        Type entityType = expr.Body.Type;
        PropertyInfo propertyInfo = entityType.GetProperty(field);
        if (propertyInfo == null)
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} doesn't exist on {1}", field, entityType.Name));
        ParameterExpression parameterExpression = Expression.Parameter(entityType, "e");

        return Expression.Lambda<Func<TElementType, object>>(
            Expression.Property(parameterExpression, propertyInfo),
            parameterExpression
        );
    }

    public static Expression<Func<T, bool>> EndsWith<T, TReturnType>(this Expression<Func<T, TReturnType>> expr, string str)
    {
        var endsWithMethod = typeof(string).GetMethod("EndsWith", new[] { typeof(string) });
        var newBody = Expression.Call(expr.Body, endsWithMethod, Expression.Constant(str));
        var result = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(newBody, expr.Parameters);
        return result;
    }

}
6
  • Ooowww! Really awesome! I need some time to digest it.
    – Jordi
    May 2, 2016 at 9:48
  • Thanks a lot @Rob for your answer. I'd like to redirect to an another link in order for you to be able to understand my trouble. I dont know whether you are going to be able to help out about it.
    – Jordi
    May 2, 2016 at 14:36
  • @Jordi No worries. I had a quick read through of that link - I believe the above is exactly what you're looking for. Is there something in particular you're stuck on?
    – Rob
    May 2, 2016 at 23:04
  • Thanks for taking a look on it. I've edited my post for describing a bit more which's my real scope.
    – Jordi
    May 3, 2016 at 5:52
  • According to your response what about if I change method signature public static Expression<Func<TElementType, string>> Field(...) by public static Expression<Func<TElementType, TReturnType>> Field(...)?
    – Jordi
    May 3, 2016 at 6:37
0

I don't know if you mess the code to show a piece of code or if it was intended, but you have a generic extension that wants A T but you don't use it

Anyway if what you want is a method that returns you the value of a property, why don't you do a static exception that return T ?

public static class EntityExtension {
   public static T Field<T>(this object entity, string field) {
       Type entityType = entity.GetType();
       PropertyInfo propertyInfo = entityType.GetProperty(field);
       if (propertyInfo == null) {
           throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} doesn't exist on {1}", field, entityType.Name));
       }

       return (T)propertyInfo.GetValue(entity);
   }
}

this is a fiddle i've done to show you the usage, pretty simple https://dotnetfiddle.net/PoSfli

posting the code too in case fiddle get lost:

using System;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq.Expressions;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {

        YourClass c = new YourClass() {
            PropA = 1,
            PropB = 2,
            PropC = "ciao"
        };


        var propBValue = c.Field<int>("PropB");
        Console.WriteLine("PropB value: {0}", propBValue);

        var propCValue = c.Field<string>("PropC");
        Console.WriteLine("PropC value: {0}", propCValue);
    }
}



public static class EntityExtension {
   public static T Field<T>(this object entity, string field) {
       Type entityType = entity.GetType();
       PropertyInfo propertyInfo = entityType.GetProperty(field);
       if (propertyInfo == null) {
           throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} doesn't exist on {1}", field, entityType.Name));
       }

       return (T)propertyInfo.GetValue(entity);
   }
}

public class YourClass {
    public int PropA { get; set; }
    public int PropB { get; set; }
    public string PropC { get; set; }
}

nota that you can improve a lot, using a typed extension and a property expression as argument instead of a string

0

You can also do something really simple like if you want to use the property name:

IEnumerable<C> classes = this.backend.cs.Where(
    c => c.Field<C>("Matter").ToString().EndsWith(string.Empty)

Or if your are filtering by property type:

 IEnumerable<C> classes = this.backend.cs.Where(
        c => c.Field<C>("Matter").Type.ToString().EndsWith(string.Empty)
0

How about something like this? Actually, your generic approach is not of use right now.


public static bool Evaluate<TField>(this object entity, string fieldName, Predicate<TField> condition)
{
    Type entityType = entity.GetType();
    PropertyInfo propertyInfo = entityType.GetProperty(field);
    if (propertyInfo == null)
        throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} doesn't exist on {1}", field, entityType.Name));

    var value = (TField)propertyInfo.GetValue(entity); //read the value and cast it to designated type, will raise invalid cast exception, if wrong
    return condition.Invoke(value); //invoke the predicate to check the condition
}

Usage would be then.

.Where(item => item.Evaluate<string>("Matter", prop => prop.EndsWith(string.Empty))

0

You can add a new extension method which returns your desired type.

    public static T Compile<T>(this Expression expression)
    {
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(expression).Compile()();
    }

In your statement you just have to add .Compile<type>()

IEnumerable<C> classes = this.backend.cs.Where(
    c => c.Field<C>("Matter").Compile<string>().EndsWith(string.Empty));

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