36

I am trying to unit test various custom FormRequest inputs. I found solutions that:

  1. Suggest using the $this->call(…) method and assert the response with the expected value (link to answer). This is overkill, because it creates a direct dependency on Routing and Controllers.

  2. Taylor’s test, from the Laravel Framework found in tests/Foundation/FoundationFormRequestTest.php. There is a lot of mocking and overhead done there.

I am looking for a solution where I can unit test individual field inputs against the rules (independent of other fields in the same request).

Sample FormRequest:

public function rules()
{
    return [
        'first_name' => 'required|between:2,50|alpha',
        'last_name'  => 'required|between:2,50|alpha',
        'email'      => 'required|email|unique:users,email',
        'username'   => 'required|between:6,50|alpha_num|unique:users,username',
        'password'   => 'required|between:8,50|alpha_num|confirmed',
    ];
}

Desired Test:

public function testFirstNameField()
{
   // assertFalse, required
   // ...

   // assertTrue, required
   // ...

   // assertFalse, between
   // ...
}

public function testLastNameField()
{
    // ...
}

How can I unit test (assert) each validation rule of every field in isolation and individually?

9
  • Well, as you said, FormRequests are tested inside Laravel so you don't have to test them again, Validation are also tested in Laravel. I don't really get what you want test exactly...
    – Elie Faës
    Commented May 4, 2016 at 20:31
  • 5
    So yeah that's what I wanted to say in my first comment, Validation rules are already tested in Laravel. In your example you just want to test if an input is valid against your set of rules but the rules work, that's what the Laravel tests tell us. I'm not really sure it's necessary to test it again. IMHO it's the same as writing $this->assertEquals([ 'first_name' => 'required|between:2,50|alpha'....], (new FormRequest)->rules())
    – Elie Faës
    Commented May 4, 2016 at 20:50
  • 1
    I am looking to test the inputs against the rules that are set both valid and invalid inputs Commented May 4, 2016 at 20:52
  • 2
    I voted up this question and redirect here all the other similar questions. I hope it will help many people. Commented Mar 29, 2019 at 0:50
  • 1
    @PeterPan666 Sure, that works for simple rules. But if you combine rules and use regular expressions and such, then things become more complicated. I trust that Laravel will test the input against the regular expression, but I don't trust myself fully understanding the rules API and always writing correct regular expressions. It would be nice to have a way to test this. Someone actually wrote a a package for this*, but I think this should work out-of-the-box. * github.com/mohammedmanssour/form-request-tester
    – Luc
    Commented Jul 14, 2019 at 18:25

3 Answers 3

40

I found a good solution on Laracast and added some customization to the mix.

The Code

/**
 * Test first_name validation rules
 * 
 * @return void
 */
public function test_valid_first_name()
{
    $this->assertTrue($this->validateField('first_name', 'jon'));
    $this->assertTrue($this->validateField('first_name', 'jo'));
    $this->assertFalse($this->validateField('first_name', 'j'));
    $this->assertFalse($this->validateField('first_name', ''));
    $this->assertFalse($this->validateField('first_name', '1'));
    $this->assertFalse($this->validateField('first_name', 'jon1'));
}

/**
 * Check a field and value against validation rule
 * 
 * @param string $field
 * @param mixed $value
 * @return bool
 */
protected function validateField(string $field, $value): bool
{
    return $this->validator->make(
        [$field => $value],
        [$field => $this->rules[$field]]
    )->passes();
}

/**
 * Set up operations
 * 
 * @return void
 */
public function setUp(): void
{
    parent::setUp();

    $this->rules     = (new UserStoreRequest())->rules();
    $this->validator = $this->app['validator'];
}

Update

There is an e2e approach to the same problem. You can POST the data to be checked to the route in question and then see if the response contains session errors.

$response = $this->json('POST', 
    '/route_in_question', 
    ['first_name' => 'S']
);
$response->assertSessionHasErrors(['first_name']);
11
  • What about password with confirmed rule?
    – Ludo237
    Commented Jun 30, 2017 at 9:40
  • @ClaudioLudovicoPanetta: Change the $field in validateField to be an array of data to check. Example: protected function validateField(array $data, string $rule_to_check) { return $this->validator->make($data, [$rule_to_check => $this->rules[$rule_to_check]]) ->passes(); } Then: $this->assertTrue($this->validateField(['password' => 'correcthorsebatterystaple', 'password_confirmation' => 'correcthorsebatterystaple'], 'password'));
    – YOMorales
    Commented Jun 14, 2018 at 15:20
  • Thank you for answering your own question. It is very considerate of you. Commented Mar 29, 2019 at 0:49
  • 2
    Please note that by using this approach, array validation does not work. To achieve this, you have to pass the validator a bigger array, including nested fields (like names.*)
    – Giraffe
    Commented Jul 13, 2019 at 12:12
  • 2
    @matiaslauriti But this is not testing the framework at all. This is testing that the FormRequest is using the right rules. There's nothing in this test that tests the implementation. It only says "for the rules applied to first_name, show that 'j' is invalid". Doing feature tests using ->get or ->post is fine, but when reusing the same FormRequests in many routes, you'll simply duplicate validation & authorization tests. Testing the way OP does allows you to test the FormRequest in isolation, and mock it in the controller tests. Commented Apr 7, 2021 at 10:24
13

I see this question has a lot of views and misconceptions, so I will add my grain of sand to help anyone who still has doubts.

First of all, remember to never test the framework, if you end up doing something similar to the other answers (building or binding a framework core's mock (disregard Facades), then you are doing something wrong related to testing).

So, if you want to test a controller, the always way to go is: Feature test it. NEVER unit test it, not only is cumbersome to unit test it (create a request with data, maybe special requirements) but also instantiate the controller (sometimes it is not new HomeController and done...).

They way to solve the author's problem is to feature test like this (remember, is an example, there are plenty of ways):

Let's say we have this rules:

public function rules()
{
    return [
        'name' => ['required', 'min:3'],
        'username' => ['required', 'min:3', 'unique:users'],
    ];
}
namespace Tests\Feature;

use App\Models\User;
use Illuminate\Foundation\Testing\RefreshDatabase;
use Tests\TestCase;

class HomeControllerTest extends TestCase
{
    use RefreshDatabase;

    /*
     * @dataProvider invalid_fields
     */
    public function test_fields_rules($field, $value, $error)
    {
        // Create fake user already existing for 'unique' rule
        User::factory()->create(['username' => 'known_username']);

        $response = $this->post('/test', [$field => $value]);

        $response->assertSessionHasErrors([$field => $error]);
    }

    public function invalid_fields()
    {
        return [
            'Null name' => ['name', null, 'The name field is required.'],
            'Empty name' => ['name', '', 'The name field is required.'],
            'Short name' => ['name', 'ab', 'The name must be at least 3 characters.'],
            'Null username' => ['username', null, 'The username field is required.'],
            'Empty username' => ['username', '', 'The username field is required.'],
            'Short username' => ['username', 'ab', 'The username must be at least 3 characters.'],
            'Unique username' => ['username', 'known_username', 'The username has already been taken.'],
        ];
    }
}

And that's it... that is the way of doing this sort of tests... No need to instantiate/mock and bind any framework (Illuminate namespace) class.

I am taking advantage of PHPUnit too, I am using data providers so I don't need to copy paste a test or create a protected/private method that a test will call to "setup" anything... I reuse the test, I just change the input (field, value and expected error).

If you need to test if a view is being displayed, just do $response->assertViewIs('whatever.your.view');, you can also pass a second attribute (but use assertViewHas) to test if the view has a variable in it (and a desired value). Again, no need to instantiate/mock any core class...

Have in consideration this is just a simple example, it can be done a little better (avoid copy pasting some errors messages).


One last important thing: If you unit test this type of things, then, if you change how this is done in the back, you will have to change your unit test (if you have mocked/instantiated core classes). For example, maybe you are now using a FormRequest, but later you switch to other validation method, like a Validator directly, or an API call to other service, so you are not even validating directly in your code. If you do a Feature Test, you will not have to change your unit test code, as it will still receive the same input and give the same output, but if it is a Unit Test, then you are going to change how it works... That is the NO-NO part I am saying about this...

Always look at test as:

  1. Setup minimum stuff (context) for it to begin with:
    • What is your context to begin with so it has logic ?
    • Should a user with X username already exist ?
    • Should I have 3 models created ?
    • Etc.
  2. Call/execute your desired code:
    • Send data to your URL (POST/PUT/PATCH/DELETE)
    • Access a URL (GET)
    • Execute your Artisan Command
    • If it is a Unit Test, instantiate your class, and call the desired method.
  3. Assert the result:
    • Assert the database for changes if you expected them
    • Assert if the returned value matches what you expected/wanted
    • Assert if a file changed in any desired way (deletion, update, etc)
    • Assert whatever you expected to happen

So, you should see tests as a black box. Input -> Output, no need to replicate the middle of it... You could setup some fakes, but not fake everything or the core of it... You could mock it, but I hope you understood what I meant to say, at this point...

5

Friends, please, make the unit-test properly, after all, it is not only rules you are testing here, the validationData and withValidator functions may be there too.

This is how it should be done:

<?php

namespace Tests\Unit;

use App\Http\Requests\AddressesRequest;
use App\Models\Country;
use Faker\Factory as FakerFactory;
use Illuminate\Routing\Redirector;
use Illuminate\Validation\ValidationException;
use Tests\TestCase;
use function app;
use function str_random;

class AddressesRequestTest extends TestCase
{


    public function test_AddressesRequest_empty()
    {
        try {
            //app(AddressesRequest::class);
            $request = new AddressesRequest([]);
            $request
                ->setContainer(app())
                ->setRedirector(app(Redirector::class))
                ->validateResolved();
        } catch (ValidationException $ex) {

        }
        //\Log::debug(print_r($ex->errors(), true));

        $this->assertTrue(isset($ex));
        $this->assertTrue(array_key_exists('the_address', $ex->errors()));
        $this->assertTrue(array_key_exists('the_address.billing', $ex->errors()));
    }


    public function test_AddressesRequest_success_billing_only()
    {
        $faker = FakerFactory::create();
        $param = [
            'the_address' => [
                'billing' => [
                    'zip'        => $faker->postcode,
                    'phone'      => $faker->phoneNumber,
                    'country_id' => $faker->numberBetween(1, Country::count()),
                    'state'      => $faker->state,
                    'state_code' => str_random(2),
                    'city'       => $faker->city,
                    'address'    => $faker->buildingNumber . ' ' . $faker->streetName,
                    'suite'      => $faker->secondaryAddress,
                ]
            ]
        ];
        try {
            //app(AddressesRequest::class);
            $request = new AddressesRequest($param);
            $request
                ->setContainer(app())
                ->setRedirector(app(Redirector::class))
                ->validateResolved();
        } catch (ValidationException $ex) {

        }

        $this->assertFalse(isset($ex));
    }


}
10
  • If you want to be very specific, then you should be testing the whole data-set as a feature and not as a unit. Commented Mar 28, 2019 at 7:19
  • 1
    @DovBenyominSohacheski, NO. Unit testing is a quicker option and it allows you to get better abstraction and encapsulation. And it is a part of the question too. You can learn from my post instead of practising your revenge down-votes. Think of being better developer, not of your self esteem, we are all learning here. Commented Mar 29, 2019 at 0:46
  • I wouldn't use random data in a test. Other than that, this seems like a good solution. Though I feel like the FormRequest wasn't designed with testability in mind.
    – Luc
    Commented Jul 14, 2019 at 18:15
  • 1
    Now you are trolling, okay, no problem at all. +1 Commented Apr 15, 2021 at 5:19
  • 1
    This a good example for Feature testing. If you have extra logic in the FormRequest class, like prepareForValidation with casting logic or whatever. This will imitate initializing the request for your controller function well so you can test separately. I found this useful. Commented Jul 6, 2023 at 22:04

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