43

I want to make a selector argument of my method refer to a closure property, both of them exist in the same scope. For example,

func backgroundChange() {
    self.view.backgroundColor = UIColor.blackColor()
    self.view.alpha = 0.55

    let backToOriginalBackground = {
        self.view.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor()
        self.view.alpha = 1.0
    }

    NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(0.5, target: self, selector: #selector(backToOriginalBackground), userInfo: nil, repeats: false)
}

However, this shows an error: Argument of #selector cannot refer to a property.

Of course I can define a new, separate method and move the implementation of the closure to it, but I want to keep it frugal for such a small implementation.

Is it possible to set a closure to #selector argument?

12 Answers 12

49

Not directly, but some workarounds are possible. Take a look at the following example.

/// Target-Action helper.
final class Action: NSObject {

    private let _action: () -> ()

    init(action: @escaping () -> ()) {
        _action = action
        super.init()
    }

    @objc func action() {
        _action()
    }

}

let action1 = Action { print("action1 triggered") }

let button = UIButton()
button.addTarget(action1, action: #selector(action1.action), forControlEvents: .TouchUpInside)
2
  • This is slick! Wish they'd add a real way to do it to Cocoa, but this is the least hacky workaround I've seen. May 29, 2019 at 21:18
  • 5
    Note: you have to keep an instance of the action that will be used by a button; the button does not take ownership of it.
    – timeSmith
    Aug 10, 2019 at 7:24
18

I tried this for UIBarButtonItem at least:

private var actionKey: Void?

extension UIBarButtonItem {

    private var _action: () -> () {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &actionKey) as! () -> ()
        }
        set {
            objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &actionKey, newValue, objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
        }
    }

    convenience init(title: String?, style: UIBarButtonItemStyle, action: @escaping () -> ()) {
        self.init(title: title, style: style, target: nil, action: #selector(pressed))
        self.target = self
        self._action = action
    }

    @objc private func pressed(sender: UIBarButtonItem) {
        _action()
    }

}

Then you can do this:

navigationItem.leftBarButtonItem = UIBarButtonItem(title: "Test", style: .plain, action: {
    print("Hello World!")
})
1
  • 3
    This is very handy and nice to keep as a Swift implementation. Thank you Feb 9, 2018 at 14:38
11

As @gnasher729 notes, this is not possible because selectors are just names of methods, not methods themselves. In the general case, I'd use dispatch_after here, but in this particular case, the better tool IMO is UIView.animateWithDuration, because it's exactly what that function is for, and it's very easy to tweak the transition:

UIView.animateWithDuration(0, delay: 0.5, options: [], animations: {
    self.view.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor()
    self.view.alpha = 1.0
}, completion: nil)
2
  • Yeah! That's it. And we were pondering with the syntax rather than the problem OP was facing and it's better solution. May 2, 2016 at 13:46
  • Please see my post below. It is possible w/ some objc-runtime magic :) Nov 2, 2017 at 20:52
7

It is now possible. I've created a gist for block-based selectors in Swift 4.

https://gist.github.com/cprovatas/98ff940140c8744c4d1f3bcce7ba4543

Usage:

UIButton().addTarget(Selector, action: Selector { debugPrint("my code here") }, for: .touchUpInside)`
1
  • 2
    You have to import the obj-c class for this to work Jan 7, 2020 at 17:29
2

You can use ActionClosurable which support UIControl, UIButton, UIRefreshControl, UIGestureRecognizer and UIBarButtonItem. https://github.com/takasek/ActionClosurable

Bellow show example of UIBarButtonItem

// UIBarButtonItem
let barButtonItem = UIBarButtonItem(title: "title", style: .plain) { _ in
    print("barButtonItem title")
}
2

@werediver's answer is excellent. Here's an update that allows you to call it as a function.

import Foundation

public extension Selector {
  /// Wraps a closure in a `Selector`.
  /// - Note: Callable as a function.
  final class Perform: NSObject {
    public init(_ perform: @escaping () -> Void) {
      self.perform = perform
      super.init()
    }

    private let perform: () -> Void
  }
}

//MARK: public
public extension Selector.Perform {
  @objc func callAsFunction() { perform() }
  var selector: Selector { #selector(callAsFunction) }
}

You need to manage strong references to Selector.Performs. One way to do that is to subclass UIKit classes that were designed to work with target-action:

/// A `UITapGestureRecognizer` that wraps a closure.
public final class TapGestureRecognizer: UITapGestureRecognizer {
  public init(_ perform: @escaping () -> Void) {
    self.perform = .init(perform)
    super.init(target: self.perform, action: self.perform.selector)
  }

  public let perform: Selector.Perform
}
let tapRecognizer = TapGestureRecognizer { print("🍔🐈") }
tapRecognizer.perform() // "🍔🐈"
2
  • Cool! But what a hassle. It needs to be integrated into iOS platform natively and cleanly to be practical in most cases IMO. In my case I wanted to move a couple of @objc selector-target functions from class scope to become sub-functions of a function, bringing them closer in file/scope to 1 place they were invoked, but xcode said #selector can't call local functions... so wanted a way to let a selector run a closure... but this is wayyy too awkward a solution for a minor issue like that. As of this writing WWDC 2022 is just 2wks away... who knows? Maybe some sympathetic Apple developer...?
    – clearlight
    May 21, 2022 at 14:26
  • Cat / hamburger. Nice example. u a riot
    – clearlight
    May 21, 2022 at 14:31
1

No, #selector refers to an Objective-C method.

You can do something much better though: Add an extension to NSTimer that lets you create a scheduled timer not with a target and selector, but with a closure.

2
  • I would be interested in seeing what that looks like. That would be useful in so many ways.
    – ryantxr
    May 2, 2016 at 13:33
  • Creating that target is a tiny bit tricky because NSTimer retains its target but definitely possible. Better to use dispatch_after though.
    – Sulthan
    May 2, 2016 at 13:47
0

If you change the scope of block to a class scope rather than function and hold a reference to closure there.

You could invoke that closure with a function. in the class. So that way you can invoke that closure as a selector.

Something like this:

class Test: NSObject {
    let backToOriginalBackground = {

    }
    func backgroundChange() {
        NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(0.5, target: self, selector: #selector(test), userInfo: nil, repeats: false)
    }

    func test() {
        self.backToOriginalBackground()
    }
}
0

My solution was to create a class block variable like:

let completionBlock: () -> () = nil

Create a method which calls this completionBlock:

func completed(){
    self.completionBlock!()
}

And inside where I want to put my selector like a block I did:

func myFunc(){
  self.completionBlock = {//what I want to be done}
  NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval(0.5, target: self, selector: #selector(Myclass.completed), userInfo: nil, repeats: false)
}
0

So my answer to having a selector be assigned to a closure in a swift like manner is similar to some of the answers already, but I thought I would share a real life example of how I did it within a UIViewController extension.

fileprivate class BarButtonItem: UIBarButtonItem {
  var actionCallback: ( () -> Void )?
  func buttonAction() {
    actionCallback?()
  }
}

fileprivate extension Selector {
  static let onBarButtonAction = #selector(BarButtonItem.buttonAction)
}

extension UIViewController {
  func createBarButtonItem(title: String, action: @escaping () -> Void ) -> UIBarButtonItem {
    let button = BarButtonItem(title: title, style: .plain, target nil, action: nil)
    button.actionCallback = action
    button.action = .onBarButtonAction
    return button
  }
}

// Example where button is inside a method of a UIViewController 
// and added to the navigationItem of the UINavigationController

let button = createBarButtonItem(title: "Done"){
  print("Do something when done")
}

navigationItem.setLeftbarButtonItems([button], animated: false)
0

Swift 5.2.x

First of all, you need to declare an "easy to use" typealias for your block:

typealias Completion = () -> ()

Then, you must declare private var to use "as a gate" for your function:

private var action: Completion?

After that, you should create a function that can be called by your Selector (it accept only string format) and to call private completion:

@objc func didAction() {
     self.action?()
}

Finally you can re-write your function (using the new swift syntax) like:

Timer.scheduledTimer(timeInterval: 0.5, target: self, selector: #selector(didAction), userInfo: nil, repeats: false)
self.action = backToOriginalBackground

P.S.: Remember that your variable (or parameter if you embed it to a function) must be of the same of type declared to your typeAlias so, in our case:

var backToOriginalBackground: () -> ()

or also:

var backToOriginalBackground: Completion
0

It has been several years since this question was asked, and it is worth noting that in those years, Apple has added variants of many selector-using methods that take closures instead.

The original question asks about NSTimer.scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval. That method is now spelled Timer.scheduledTimer and has a version that takes a closure. So the function in the original question can be rewritten thus:

extension UIViewController {
    func changeBackground() {
        self.view.backgroundColor = .black
        self.view.alpha = 0.55

        Timer.scheduledTimer(withTimeInterval: 0.5, repeats: false) { _ in
            self.view.backgroundColor = .white
            self.view.alpha = 1.0
        }
    }
}

Here are some other common cases where, as of May 2016, a selector was required, but which can now use a closure:

  • UIControl now has an addAction method that takes a UIAction, and UIAction takes a closure. Subclasses of UIControl include UIButton, UISwitch, and UITextField.

  • UIBarButtonItem has an initializer that takes a UIAction.

  • NotificationCenter now has an addObserver method that takes a closure. It also supports Combine (the publisher method) and async/await (the notifications method).

  • RunLoop now has a perform method that takes a closure.

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