5

I know I can read range of cells using that code:

worksheet.cell(range="A1:J1").value

but I prefer to use numbers instead of letters to select columns, something like that:

worksheet.cell(row=1,column=1:10).value

Is this possible?

5

ws.cell() can only return individual cells so ranges for it make no sense. To access a range of cells you can use ws.iter_rows() or ws.rows or ws.columns. Upto and including version 2.3 ws.iter_rows() only accepts Excel-style range notation but you can use row and column offsets to create a range. Starting with version 2.4 you will be able to provide fully numerical (1-based indexing) values for min_row, min_col, max_row and max_col.

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  • Single cell access example for A1: ws.cell(row=1, column=1).value = 'test' – Aralox Aug 30 '17 at 3:28
  • Aside from iter_rows, it seems like there should be a single method (ws.cells) that can provides range comprehension by truth tests args to determine if someone wants a row, col, cell, or range. ie if row=None, col=7: return ws.columns[7]. Perhaps once I become competent at unit testing I could help with this... – virtualxtc Aug 25 '18 at 23:12
9

Are you sure worksheet.cell(range="A1:J1").value is possible?

The above may be possible using range function as given in the official documentation:

http://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/default/api/openpyxl.worksheet.worksheet.html

There are 2 ways to use worksheet.cell:

Usage: cell(coodinate=’A15’) or cell(row=15, column=1)

If coordinates are not given, then row and column must be given.

So, you can use a list comprehension:

data = [worksheet.cell(row=1,column=i).value for i in range(1,11)]
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0

It seems you want to break a range into rows and store the cell values of each row in a tuple or list. There are 2 methods that are clean and easy for this:

Assumptions:

ws: worksheet e.g. ws=wb['Sheet1']

rng: any range in ws e.g. rng=ws['A1':'D10'] or rng=ws['A1':'D' + str(ws.max_column)]

Method 1:

t=tuple(rng)

this will return a tuple that contains tuples of each row. So in this example, t will have 10 tuples and each inner tuple will have 4 elements/values.

Method 2:

final_list=[]
for row in rng:
    mylist=list(row)
    final_list.append(mylist)

this will be pretty much the same thing except instead of tuples you would have lists.

NOTE:

list of lists or tuple of tuples will store cells and not their values, so to access their value do this:

first_cell_value=t[0][0].value
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0

Depending on how you want to read this data! For example

type(sheet['A7':'B8'])

will give you <class 'tuple'>, by typing

type(sheet['A7':'B8'][i])

where i=1,2, you will get the same type. Therefore it is a tuple of tuples. It has as many tuple as the number of rows in the range.

I define a function with the start-end indeices of the row-column range as its arguments and returning a similar tuple of tuples but having values of the cells inside. You can similarly define your own function with a different type of output and any information that you want to extract.

def RangeValue(a, b, c, d):
    return(tuple(tuple(sheet.cell(row=a+i, column=c+j).value for j in range(d-c+1)) for i in range(b-a+1)))

Now for the range A7:B8, you just need to ask RangeValue(7,8,1,2).

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