0

I have a hash, that I select all the data for a dashboard to display performance, since displaying the latest value isn't always helpful, I'm trying to select the last 4 values from a hash.

I have attempted the thing.last(4), but to no avail.

Code is below, essentially trying to display the last 4 from top_points, or average points.

Note: Ruby 1.9

metric.sort.each do |key, value|
  top_point = { x: Time.parse(key).to_time.to_i, y: value['top_10'] }
  top_points << top_point

  average_point = { x: Time.parse(key).to_time.to_i, y: value['average'] }
  average_points << average_point
end
1

in order to get the last four elements of your hash, you should first map it as an array, get the indexes desired and then transform again the array into an hash.

For example:

2.2.1 :001 > hash = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4, e: 5}
 => {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3, :d=>4, :e=>5} 
2.2.1 :002 > hash.map{|h| h}[-4..-1].to_h
 => {:b=>2, :c=>3, :d=>4, :e=>5} 

In your specific case, the code might look like this:

metric.sort.map{|h| h}[-4..-1].to_h.each do |key, value|
    top_point = { x: Time.parse(key).to_time.to_i, y: value['top_10'] }
    top_points << top_point

    average_point = { x: Time.parse(key).to_time.to_i, y: value['average'] }
    average_points << average_point
  end

Another way to write it could be:

last_four_metrics = metric.sort.map{|h| h}[-4..-1].to_h
top_points = last_four_metrics.map{|k, v| { x: Time.parse(k).to_time.to_i, y: v['top_10'] }}
average_points = last_four_metrics.map{|k, v| { x: Time.parse(k).to_time.to_i, y: v['average'] }}

Update: compatibility with Ruby 1.9

last_four_metrics = Hash[ metric.sort.map{|h| h}[-4..-1] ]

top_points = last_four_metrics.map{|k, v| { x: Time.parse(k).to_time.to_i, y: v['top_10'] }}
average_points = last_four_metrics.map{|k, v| { x: Time.parse(k).to_time.to_i, y: v['average'] }}
  • I sort of like this best. I would although have it sepereated since what I'm doing is the graph will display as is, but the "key" or "legend" would say the averages. Ran into this when trying to implement to_h NoMethodError 70214561670280 undefined method `to_h' for #<Array:0x007fb834034a28> I am using 1.9 – Spartacus38 May 2 '16 at 15:30
  • actually the method .to_h is supported from Ruby 2.1. An alternative way is Hash[your_array] – mabe02 May 2 '16 at 15:36
  • This worked like a charm! Now to integrate this as a seperate just for my legend. Thanks! And to average the last 4? – Spartacus38 May 2 '16 at 16:00
  • Try to have a look at this question – mabe02 May 3 '16 at 9:44
  • You could write hash.to_a.last(4).to_h instead of ` hash.map{|h| h}[-4..-1].to_h`. – Cary Swoveland May 3 '16 at 13:50
3

The following uses Hash#select to avoid the need to convert the hash to an array, manipulate the array and then convert it back to a hash.

h = { "b"=>1, "d"=>6, "f"=>3, "e"=>1, "c"=>3, "a"=>7 }

sz = h.size
  #=> 6
h.select { (sz -= 1) < 4 }
  #=> {"f"=>3, "e"=>1, "c"=>3, "a"=>7} 

Another hash->array->hash way, if you are using Ruby 2.2+, would be to use the form of Enumerable#max that accepts an argument. That would be more efficient than sorting the array if the array is large relative to the number of the largest values desired.

h.max(4).to_h
  #=> {"f"=>3, "e"=>1, "d"=>6, "c"=>3} 
0

You can convert the hash to a 2-element array, select the last for elements and convert back to hash:

top_points = {}
(1..10).each { |i| top_points[i] = i*2 }
# => top_points == {1=>2, 2=>4, 3=>6, 4=>8, 5=>10, 6=>12, 7=>14, 8=>16, 9=>18, 10=>20}

Hash[top_points.to_a[-4..-1]]
# => {7=>14, 8=>16, 9=>18, 10=>20}

You need to use ruby 1.9+ for this to work (since this version it keeps hash keys in the given order).

0
metrics.sort.last(4).to_h

Will give you a hash with the last four elements.


Assuming you didn't originally want to sort, use the same idea:

metrics.to_a.last(4).to_h

Update: Given you added the 1.9 restriction and Array#to_h comes from 2.1 onward, you can replace x.to_h with Hash[x].

Or if you don't need the hash and want to iterate over the key/value pairs, omitting the .to_h part and continuing with .each do |key, value| will pretty much do the same.

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