30
class Base{  
    public:  
        void counter();   
    ....   
}

class Dervied: public Base{  
    public:  
        ....  
}

void main()  
{  
     Base *ptr=new Derived;  
     ptr->counter();  
}

To identify that the base class pointer is pointing to derived class and using a derived member function, we make use of "virtual".

Similarly, can we make derived data members "virtual"? (the data member is public)

9
  • 2
    the obvious question is why? what is the need for it? may be there are alternate ways to solve that problem.
    – Naveen
    Sep 13, 2010 at 8:36
  • 1
    You (usually) shouldn't use public data members anyway and go for accessors instead - thus you shouldn't even have a need for this. Sep 13, 2010 at 8:39
  • 2
    Please add the word virtual somewhere in your pseudocode. Sep 13, 2010 at 9:10
  • 4
    @Georg: Nonsense, public data members have their place. Sep 13, 2010 at 16:26
  • 2
    @andre: Just an idea: Virtual data members could be used for mixins or duck typing. When 2 classes A and B both define a virtual int count, then a derived class which inherits A and B could carry only a single (as it is virtual) count member. For this the base-classes either need to have a compatible layout or the compiler could automatically create getter/setters which synchronize the value for both base classes.
    – Tino
    Jan 25, 2014 at 20:24

9 Answers 9

35

virtual is a Function specifier...

From standard docs,

7.1.2 Function specifiers Function-specifiers can be used only in function declarations. function-specifier: inline virtual explicit

So there is nothing called Virtual data member.

Hope it helps...

2
16

No, but you can create a virtual function to return a pointer to what you call virtual data member

2
  • You probably can't do that, since it may lead to access violation.
    – C--
    Sep 28, 2019 at 5:23
  • 2
    It would require extra care
    – mmonem
    Sep 28, 2019 at 9:54
5

No, in C++ there are no virtual data members.

1
2

I think not, but you might simulate it using virtual getters and setter perhaps?

2

To identify that the base class pointer is pointing to derived class and using a derived member function, we make use of "virtual".

That is not correct. We make virtual functions to allow derived classes to provide different implementation from what the base provides. It is not used to identify that the base class pointer is pointing to derived class.

Similarly, can we make derived data members "virtual"? (the data member is public)

Only non static member functions can be virtual. Data members can not be.

Here's a link with some more info on that

1
  • 2
    "We make virtual functions to allow derived classes to provide different implementation from what the base provides." Not quite, you already get that when you create a derived class and write a function with the same name as one in a superclass. What virtual does is allow you to cast an object to one of its superclasses but still use the derived class's implementation for virtual functions. (In other words, C++ uses static dispatch for normal functions and dynamic dispatch for virtual ones.)
    – JAB
    Nov 20, 2013 at 16:30
2

No, because that would break encapsulation in a myriad of unexpected ways. Whatever you want to achieve can be done with protected attributes and/or virtual functions.

Besides, virtual functions are a method of dispatch (i.e. selecting which function is going to be called), rather than selecting a memory location corresponding to the member attribute.

1
  • Could you please provide an example or two where this would be a problem (and that is not a problem of diamond inheritance already)? I've been wondering about the reasons of this decision.
    – The Vee
    Mar 9, 2018 at 8:34
0

Maybe you can see the problem in a equivalent way:

class VirtualDataMember{  
    public:  
    ...
}

class DerviedDataMember: public VirtualDataMember{  
    public:  
    ... 
}

class Base{  
    public:  
        VirtualDataMember* dataMember;
        void counter();     
        ...  
}
0

A class cannot have a virtual member, see for instance this answer. However, you can have something similar using pointers, inheritance and runtime polymorphism.

In the following snippet I define the prototype for a geometrical shape, that has an area method. The picture class has a member shape* s; and the methods of that shape pointed by s are used by picture::show(). In this setup it is undesirable to have an instance of picture before an actual implementation of a shape has been given, hence we force picture to be abstract by adding a dummy virtual function picture::make_real().

// prototypes
class shape
{
    public:
    virtual double area() = 0; // to be defined later
};
class picture
{
    protected:
    shape* s;
    
    virtual void make_real() = 0; // force picture to be abstract
    
    public:
    picture(shape* ptr):
        s{ptr}
    {}
    
    void show()
    {
        std::cout << s->area() << '\n';
    }
};

Next, we actually implement a shape called square and a picture type square_picture that (literally) has a square shape.

// actual implementation

class square : public shape
{
    double len;
    
    public:
    square(double l):
        len{l}
    {}
     
     double area() override
    {
        return len*len;
    }
};



class square_picture : public picture
{
    void make_real() override {} // square_picture is not abstract
    
    public:
    square_picture(double l):
        picture{new square{l}}
    {}
    
    ~square_picture()
    {
        delete s;
    }
};

The class square_picture can be tested with the following snippet

int main()
{
    square_picture A{2.0};
    A.show();
    
    //picture B{nullptr}; // error: picture is abstract
    return 0;
}

which outputs:

4
0

I have a base class which uses an array of objects. From that class I derived a new class that uses an array of a different type of object. Both variables have exactly the same name. Virtual member functions were added to both classes to process the arrays. These member functions have no trouble finding the correct variable. The member functions and the variables they use are in a common scope.

The virtual member functions are nearly identical in both classes. Only the type of array changed.

C++ templates could have accomplished the same result.

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