66

I have a timestamp coming in, I wonder if there's a way to round it down to the start of a day in PST. For example, ts: 1305861602 corresponds to 2016-04-14, 21:10:27 -0700, but I want to round it to a timestamp that maps to 2016-04-14 00:00:00 -0700. I read through the time.Time doc but didn't find a way to do it.

4
  • 2
    Does Time.Truncate not do what you want?
    – JimB
    May 2, 2016 at 18:15
  • Truncate is another option, I think it's more of a pain to implement however because you have to create a Duration to represent the hours, minutes, seconds and nanoseconds. May 2, 2016 at 18:20
  • 3
    Time.Truncate only works if you want UTC, AFAICT
    – schimmy
    Aug 8, 2017 at 21:58
  • May be Time.Round will do the trick?
    – Mihail
    Nov 29, 2022 at 9:37

6 Answers 6

101

The simple way to do this is to create new Time using the previous one and only assigning the year month and day. It would look like this;

func truncateToDay(t time.Time) time.Time {
    return time.Date(t.Year(), t.Month(), t.Day(), 0, 0, 0, 0, t.Location())
}

here's a play example; https://play.golang.org/p/jnFuZxruKm

43

You can simply use duration 24 * time.Hour to truncate time.

t := time.Date(2015, 4, 2, 0, 15, 30, 918273645, time.UTC)
d := 24 * time.Hour
t.Truncate(d)

https://play.golang.org/p/BTz7wjLTWX

4
  • 78
    Note that truncate always truncates against UTC, so if your timezone is not UTC, the resulting time will not be 00:00 in that timezone.
    – Guy
    Nov 7, 2016 at 7:32
  • t.Zone() will return the difference to calculate play.golang.org/p/UIhTnurbayW Sep 7, 2020 at 23:18
  • 2
    Do not use this one! The first comment is right - From Truncate() documentation - // Truncate operates on the time as an absolute duration since the zero time; it does not operate on the presentation form of the time. Thus, Truncate(Hour) may return a time with a non-zero minute, depending on the time's Location.
    – homiak
    Oct 30, 2020 at 9:24
  • It also states that: The rounding behavior for halfway values is to round up. So you might get next day when time is afternoon.
    – Arkemlar
    Nov 23, 2023 at 12:32
8

I believe the simplest is to create a new date as shown in this answer. However, if you wanna use time.Truncate, there is two distinct cases.

If you are working in UTC:

var testUtcTime = time.Date(2016, 4, 14, 21, 10, 27, 0, time.UTC)
// outputs 2016-04-14T00:00:00Z
fmt.Println(testUtcTime.Truncate(time.Hour * 24).Format(time.RFC3339)) 

If you are not, you need to convert back and forth to UTC

var testTime = time.Date(2016, 4, 14, 21, 10, 27, 0, time.FixedZone("my zone", -7*3600))
// this is wrong (outputs 2016-04-14T17:00:00-07:00)
fmt.Println(testTime.Truncate(time.Hour * 24).Format(time.RFC3339)) 
// this is correct (outputs 2016-04-14T00:00:00-07:00)
fmt.Println(testTime.Add(-7 * 3600 * time.Second).Truncate(time.Hour * 24).Add(7 * 3600 * time.Second).Format(time.RFC3339)) 
3

I using theses functions on all my projects:

package time_utils

import "time"

func TruncateToStartOfDay(t time.Time) time.Time {
    return time.Date(t.Year(), t.Month(), t.Day(), 0, 0, 0, 0, t.Location())
}

func TruncateToEndOfDay(t time.Time) time.Time {
    return time.Date(t.Year(), t.Month(), t.Day(), 23, 59, 59, 0, t.Location())
}

1

in addition to sticky's answer to get the local Truncate do like this

t := time.Date(2015, 4, 2, 0, 15, 30, 918273645, time.Local)

d := 24 * time.Hour

fmt.Println("in UTC", t.Truncate(d))

_, dif := t.Zone()

fmt.Println("in Local", t.Truncate(24 * time.Hour).Add(time.Second * time.Duration(-dif)))
1
func truncateToDay(t time.Time) {
    nt, _ := time.Parse("2006-01-02", t.Format("2006-01-02"))
    fmt.Println(nt)
}

This is not elegant but works.

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