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I'm solving some task from java at hackerrank.com. The task is to give the number of negative subarrays. On the input: The first line consists an integer n. The next line will contain n space separated integers. On the output: print number of negative subarrays.

A sub-array is "Negative" if sum of all the integers in that sub-array is negative.

(link for the task: https://www.hackerrank.com/challenges/java-1d-array-easy)

I'm trying to solve this task using Java 8 feats. I've written the code that passes all tests and solves this task. However, I'm wondering if it's possible to refactor this code to use only one stream operation. In other words, I'm wondering how to write sth like:

long result = Arrays.asList(....)
    ...
    .filter(sum -> sum < 0)
    .count();

My solution:

public class Solution01 {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        int n = Integer.parseInt(sc.nextLine());
        String s = sc.nextLine();
        sc.close();

        List<Integer> nums = Arrays.asList(s.split(" ")).stream()
                .map(Integer::parseInt)
                .collect(Collectors.toList());

        long result = getAllSubarrays(nums)
            .map(num -> mySum(num))
            .filter(sum -> sum < 0)
            .count();

        System.out.println(result);
    }

    public static Stream<List<Integer>> getAllSubarrays(List<Integer> array){
        List<List<Integer>> nums = new ArrayList<>();
        List<Integer> num;

        for(int i = 0; i < array.size(); i++){
            for(int j = i; j < array.size(); j++){
                num = new ArrayList<>();
                for(int k = i; k <= j; k++){
                    num.add(array.get(k));
                }
                nums.add(num);
            }
        }

        return nums.stream();
    }

    public static Integer mySum(List<Integer> nums){
        int sum = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < nums.size(); i++)
            sum += nums.get(i);

        return sum;
    }
} 

PS. I make no use of first line of input :)

  • 2
    Quoting the challenge: This problem will test your knowledge on java array. – Andreas May 2 '16 at 18:10
  • Must you use streams? This problem does not seem to warrant that. The List<List<Integer>> appears quite unnecessary. – Kedar Mhaswade May 2 '16 at 19:45
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Try this.

long result = IntStream.range(0, nums.size())
    .flatMap(from -> IntStream.range(from + 1, nums.size() + 1)
        .map(to -> nums.subList(from, to).stream()
            .mapToInt(i -> i)
            .sum()))
    .filter(sum -> sum < 0)
    .count();
|improve this answer|||||
1

I am going to claim that the following straightforward quadratic algorithm (faster than that, anyone?) is actually a Java 8 solution. In my opinion, it is more expressive than this solution. It's also much faster (with rudimentary testing). Of course, to compare the speeds, I should do some JMH benchmarking. With a 10_000-int array, it usually runs two orders of magnitude faster than the alternative referred to on my computer.

public class NumNegSubarrays {
    public static long get(int[] a) {
        long global = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
            long sum = 0, negs = 0;
            for (int j = i; j < a.length; j++) {
                sum += a[j];
                if (sum < 0)
                    negs += 1;
//                System.out.println("num of negative subarrays start-end: [" + i + ", " + j +"] = " + negs);
            }
            global += negs;
        }
        return global;
    }
    public static long finallyGet(int[] a) {
        List<Integer> nums = IntStream.of(a).boxed().collect(Collectors.toList());
        return IntStream.range(0, nums.size())
                .flatMap(from -> IntStream.range(from + 1, nums.size() + 1)
                        .map(to -> nums.subList(from, to).stream()
                                .mapToInt(i -> i)
                                .sum()))
                .filter(sum -> sum < 0)
                .count();
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] a = getSomeArray(10_00);
        long t1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Java: " + get(a));
        System.out.println("time: " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - t1) + " ms");
        t1 = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Java 8?: " + finallyGet(a));
        System.out.println("time: " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - t1) + " ms");
    }

    private static int[] getSomeArray(int n) {
        Random r = new Random();
        int[] a = new int[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i ++)
            a[i] = r.nextInt(20) * (r.nextBoolean() ? 1 : -1);
        return a;
    }
}

Sample run:

Java: 118824
time: 6 ms
Java 8?: 118824
time: 362 ms

(the answers match!)

|improve this answer|||||
0

Stream solution proposed by @saka1029 could be improved to avoid unnecessary boxing (assuming that a is the input array of numbers):

return IntStream.range(0, a.length)
        .flatMap(from -> IntStream.rangeClosed(from + 1, a.length)
                .map(to -> Arrays.stream(a, from, to).sum()))
        .filter(sum -> sum < 0)
        .count();

But in general @KedarMhaswade is correct (even though his benchmark is absolutely wrong): Stream version will be slower as it's O(n^3) while there's quite straightforward O(n^2) solution. Some third-party libraries including my free StreamEx library offer missing scanLeft operation which could solve this problem much faster:

return IntStreamEx.range(a.length)
        .mapToObj(from -> IntStreamEx.of(a, from, a.length).scanLeft(Integer::sum))
        .flatMapToInt(IntStreamEx::of)
        .less(0)
        .count();

This is still slower than for-loop (mostly due to intermediate array creation), but much faster than Stream version. Here's simple JMH benchmark and the results on my machine are the following:

Benchmark                  (n)  Mode  Cnt        Score         Error  Units
SumNegSubarrays.plain       20  avgt   30        0.204 ±       0.018  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.plain      200  avgt   30       17.954 ±       2.377  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.plain     2000  avgt   30     1771.498 ±     261.350  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.stream      20  avgt   30       32.968 ±       1.452  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.stream     200  avgt   30     4155.032 ±     979.567  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.stream    2000  avgt   30  2861219.766 ± 1102650.895  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.streamEx    20  avgt   30        2.394 ±       0.319  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.streamEx   200  avgt   30      106.171 ±      25.345  us/op
SumNegSubarrays.streamEx  2000  avgt   30     9379.915 ±    2289.908  us/op
|improve this answer|||||
  • @Holger, scanLeft is a terminal op in my library which returns an array. It's possible to implement it as an intermediate, but it's quite difficult to parallelize it. Probably I will implement it sooner or later... – Tagir Valeev May 3 '16 at 9:51
  • To me, it looks very much like a prefix operation. – Holger May 3 '16 at 10:25
  • @Holger, yep it is. The question is how to implement it efficiently and (at least partially) lazy without the necessity to store the whole stream in the memory using only Spliterator interface. – Tagir Valeev May 3 '16 at 10:45
  • Since you are returning the whole array anyway, trying to do it lazily has no point… – Holger May 3 '16 at 10:51

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