6

I have a class Filter which has the method process overloaded for various inputs.

template< typename T >
class Filter
{ 
public:
    void process(T arr[], size_t len);
    T process(T one_value);
    void process(std::array &arr);
    void process(std::vector &v);
    //... many other variants

    using operator() = process;  // How to write proper?
}

I want to simplify the user code omitting process: filter.process(values) will become filter(values). I don't think that writing an overloaded operator() for every variant is good idea. There must exist a more convenient solution?

7

Since you already have templates in the mix; why not try a variadic template as well;

template <typename... Args>
auto operator()(Args&&... args)
// assuming non-reference returns
{
  return process(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

Alternatively; if references are returned form some of the overloads (not shown in the OP);

template <typename... Args>
decltype(auto) operator()(Args&&... args)
// caters for reference returns
{
  return process(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

For further completeness and broader use cases; if desired, the following offers SFINAE-friendly behaviour and depending on the compiler, shorter/easier error messages;

template <typename... Args>
auto operator()(Args&&... args) -> decltype(process(std::forward<Args>(args)...))
// SFINAE support using a trailing decltype
{
  return process(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}
  • If you want to completely bypass type-checking by the compiler and potentially introduce a lot of subtle bugs, then sure, go ahead. – Dan Korn May 2 '16 at 19:54
  • 2
    There is no bypassing any type checks, there are no conversions either. process will receive the arguments as provided to the operator(). – Niall May 2 '16 at 19:58
  • 4
    @DanKorn I think it's pretty common to answer the c++ tag with C++ code that adheres to the current standard. That is, I don't think the c++ tag implies C++03 or any other specific standard. – James Adkison May 2 '16 at 20:03
  • 2
    @DanKorn Right now current is C++14. As far as the type safety if arguments are passed that cannot be resolved with overload resolution then a compiler error will be generated on the call to process in operator(). As long as the OP has all of the process they want defined calling () with bad parameters is just like calling process with bad parameters. – NathanOliver May 2 '16 at 20:11
  • 1
    And the OP does. Process has all of the overloads. If you call it for an invalid overload then you get an error just like you would calling process with an invalid overload. – NathanOliver May 2 '16 at 20:17
8

Sure, Just template the operator(), use Universal Reference, and perfect-forward the arguments to process. of cause, you need to add the appropriate header.

template< typename T >
class Filter
{ 
public:
    void process(T arr[], size_t len);
    T process(T one_value);
    void process(std::array &arr);
    void process(std::vector &v);
    //... many other variants

    template<typename... Y>
    auto operator () (Y&&... y)
        -> decltype(process(std::declval<Y>()...))
    {
         return process(std::forward<Y>(y)...);
    }
}

However, note that every overload of process must be declared before operator ()(...) - Thanks T.C

  • I think, I'll just leave my answer for other people to see the simplicity of C++14's enhanced auto return type deduction as shown in Nail's answer. – WhiZTiM May 2 '16 at 20:08
  • 1
    @T.C. Do we need the declvals at all? Maybe just decltype(process(std::forward<Y>(y)...)) ? – Barry May 2 '16 at 20:41
-4

Okay, you edited the question, so this answers what you're asking now, specifically, "I want to simplify the user code omitting process: filter.process(values) will become filter(values)."

Just make all those overloads into constructors instead, like so:

template< typename T >
class Filter
{ 
public:
    void Filter(T arr[], size_t len);
    T Filter(T one_value);
    void Filter(std::array &arr);
    void Filter(std::vector &v);
    //... many other variants
};
  • 1
    This does not match how the OP wants to call the filter. – NathanOliver May 2 '16 at 20:16

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