26

I write a function that should convert a string to a number. I see two possible variants to write it:

int convert(const std::string input) {
    if (input == "one") {
        return 1;
    } else if (input == "two") {
        return 2;
    }
    // etc.
    return 0;
}

Or

int convert(const std::string input) {
    static const map<string, int> table = {
        {"one", 1},
        {"two", 2}
        // etc.
    }

    const auto result = table.find(input);

    if (result == table.end())
    {
        return 0;
    }

    return result->second;
}

What way is more effective/acceptable/readable?

8
  • 4
    You should clarify cardinality and hit frequency. If you have couple strings, or most hits are to small subset of strings, then the first. But generally, starting from dozen strings - the later. Don't forget to count the overhead of first call to the later variant. Generally, IME, the later is better, since it is easier to maintain.
    – Dummy00001
    May 3, 2016 at 15:19
  • @ChrisDrew You are correct. I came up searching the other way and I didn;t look at the code closely enough. May 3, 2016 at 15:23
  • 2
    I'd use std::unordered_map - O(1) amortized lookup is nice!
    – erip
    May 3, 2016 at 20:56
  • 1
    I think the input argument should be passed as reference to const
    – Tien
    May 3, 2016 at 21:26
  • 1
    @erip: Asymptotic complexity guarantees are rather irrelevant in such cases. Also, std::map is notoriously slow and std::unordered_map is relatively slow as containers go.
    – einpoklum
    May 3, 2016 at 23:04

9 Answers 9

22

The answer greatly depends on how many different strings you are going to support by this.

A few strings: go with if-else. The effort needed to understand the code later is little.

A lot of strings: Create a map. The effort understanding the code is small compared to the effort reading a huge if-else construct. Probably, you will have to extend this list often. Adding data requires less typing.

I am not sure how smart C++'s map is using strings as keys. In the worst case, both have the same performance. If the list gets really huge, you might think of creating a hash value of the strings and use this as a key. This might improve performance greatly. You will have to make sure that collisions don't happen though. (A good hash algorithm and 64 bit hash size should be sufficient.) It might be that modern map implementations do this already.

2
  • 10
    most C++ std::map implementation use binary search, while std::unordered_map uses hash table (which the hash function can be customized). May 3, 2016 at 15:52
  • 3
    @Calvin To be pedantic maps are normally implemented as red-black trees (which is a kind of self-balancing binary search tree.) The time complexity to access an element is logarithmic in the size of the map. On average a hash table is O(1) worst case it might be O(n) (If you'd use the same key, which wouldn't be the case for this problem)
    – A.Fagrell
    May 3, 2016 at 16:08
8

For small set of text, I'd use a simple lookup table:

struct LookupTable {
    const char* text;
    int value;
};
const LookupTable table[] = {
    { "one", 1 },
    { "two", 2 }
};
int convert(const char* text) {
    if (!text) return 0;
    for (int i=0; i<sizeof(table)/sizeof(LookupTable); i++) {
        if (strcasecmp(text, table[i].text) == 0 ) {
            return table[i].value;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

For large set of text, I would consider using std::unordered_map<std::string,int>, and perhaps custom hash function (bkdr hash or elf hash is good on words).


EDIT: As David pointed out in comment, if you don't want the ugly sizeof, use the modern for-loop:

int convert(const char* text) {
    if (!text) return 0;
    for (auto& entry: table) {
        if (strcasecmp(text, entry.text) == 0 ) {
            return entry.value;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
6
  • 10
    std::array or std::vector is almost certainly better than a C array and using sizeof which there is little need for in modern C++
    – johnbakers
    May 3, 2016 at 15:28
  • 4
    Why go through the trouble of creating LookupTable when std::map would suffice?
    – R Sahu
    May 3, 2016 at 15:28
  • 1
    @R Sahu - std::map is a pig data structure when it's small; std::array, vector, or even unordered map are more size-efficient for small collections. This answer is basically correct - for small tables linear search will likely be fast just because of good cache/prefetch behavior, while for large tables unordered map is quite good (and asymptotically better than std::map); For a fixed table, a sorted vector and binary search will also be very good. May 3, 2016 at 15:31
  • 2
    for (auto& i : table) { if (!strcmp(text, i.text)) return i.value; }
    – David
    May 3, 2016 at 16:39
  • 1
    If you want to guarantee the table is ordered, you could use std::binary_search and basically be as good as a map without all the allocations.
    – David
    May 3, 2016 at 16:43
6

An if-else (or a switch, if available to you) are good for small cases, and you can also control the order of the tests in case the most common tests can cut out the search quickly, you can test them first.

In many cases, a switch is far better than a list of if-elses. Both easier to read and very possibly faster. Though switch is not the best choice with string.

You could however switch on an enum rather than using strings; this is certainly the better approach, except for a map.

A map or std::unordered_map is far better for large numbers of possibilities or when you need these possibilities updated at runtime.

3
  • 3
    You can't use switch with a string, so I would argue that it's not better in their particular case.
    – eerorika
    May 3, 2016 at 15:27
  • @Nim there's nothing wrong with mentioning it in context, since the OP might use any technique discussed here with other data types than string some day, not realizing there are good alternatives to if-else.
    – johnbakers
    May 3, 2016 at 15:38
  • for someone who is not versed with c++ development, I would agree (i.e. learner) however it doesn't appear that the OP falls into that category.. ;) - hence there is no point in mentioning it as anyone who stumbles into this will most likely be confused..
    – Nim
    May 3, 2016 at 15:42
3

For a small number of possible input values, I would prefer solution 1 which is straightforward and probably has the best performance.

If the list of values becomes too big, then what you really need is a converter between integers and written numbers, and that really is a different story (see the "Humanizer" library referenced in the comment by NathanOliver

3

What way is more effective/acceptable/readable?

The if/else solution is the most efficient if you only have a couple values, and is certainly quite straightforward especially for people not used to the Standard Library, however it quickly devolves into a mess.

Thus, as soon as you reach a 5 or more items, switch to using a container.

Caveat: unfortunately, std::string_view, which would avoid a memory allocation, is still not standard; for simplicity I will thus use std::string, though if memory allocation is an issue, std::string_view or a custom CStr class would be better.

There are 3 valid choices:

  • std::map<std::string, int> and std::unordered_map<std::string, int> are the most intuitive choices, it's unclear which would be faster
  • std::vector<std::pair<std::string, int>> (sorted) will always be more efficient than std::map<std::string, int>

Thus, if efficiency is a concern:

int convert(std::string const& name) {
    static std::vector<std::pair<std::string, int>> const Table = []() {
        std::vector<std::pair<std::string, int>> result = {
            { "one", 1 },
            { "two", 2 },
            { "three", 3 },
            { "four", 4 }
        };
        std::sort(result.begin(), result.end());
        return result;
    }();

    auto const it =
        std::lower_bound(Table.begin(), Table.end(), std::make_pair(name, 0));

    if (it != Table.end() and it->first == name) {
        return it->second;
    }
    return 0;
}

A sorted array is, after all, the most efficient way to perform a binary search, because of a better cache behavior. It should also outperform std::unordered_map on smallish inputs for the same reasons.

Of course, it is slightly less readable.

2

I suggest map. The primary reason is that it scales better, in both possible meanings of the word.

Should you need to add more conditions in the future, which is probably likely, it is more maintainable and manageable to use the map. Additionally, it allows runtime modification of the lookup table, which can be very useful in some contexts.

I had to deal with a similar question in something I am developing, where a lookup like this had to be modifiable by child classes. I decided that maps offered more flexibility. Maps allow me to define a virtual function, like getLookup(), which returns a lookup table. In that function I can keep a static map (which I set up in the way I need on the first call) specific to that class type. If you are considering this sort of application, then I highly suggest maps over if chains. If chains are entirely unmanageable in inheritance. You'll start asking "how do I change what X resolves to?" sooner or later, and there will be very little practical answer other than spaghetti.

One other comment: consider unordered_map. Range iteration seems highly unlikely for this use case.

2

The if-else search has a complexity of O(n) while the map search O(log n). Also, when the list getting longer, the if-else statements will become unreadable. Therefore, map is better.

On the other hand regarding the argument in function declaration:

int convert(const std::string input)

I would change it to pass-by-constant-reference instead of pass-by-constant-copy to be more efficient:

int convert(const std::string& input)
2

I made some crude measurements of many of the different answers here plus a couple of my own ideas and for the case of the numbers "one" to "nine" on GCC found that this was the fastest:

int convert(const std::string& input) {
    static const std::array<std::string, 9> numbers 
        = {"one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", "nine"};
    auto find_result = std::find(numbers.begin(), numbers.end(), input);
    if (find_result == numbers.end())
        return 0;
    return std::distance(numbers.begin(), find_result) + 1;
}

I happen to think that it is also reasonably "acceptable" and "readable".

There is not a great deal of difference in performance between any of the suggestions.

Results were similar with Clang. Interestingly, quite different for Visual Studio 2015.

1
1

This is one of the things X macros are great for:

This is similar to @Calvin's lookup table method without having to keep track of multiple sets of data in multiple places.

//alphabetically sorted by string X macro

#define MAP_AS_ENUM(e,v,s) MYENUM_##e,
#define MAP_AS_STRING(e,v,s) s,
#define MAP_AS_VALUE(e,v,s) v,
#define MYMAP(OP) \
  OP(NONE,  -1,"") \
  OP(FIVE,  5, "five") \
  OP(FOUR,  4, "four") \
  OP(ONE,   1, "one") \
  OP(THREE, 3, "three") \
  OP(TWO,   2, "two") \
  OP(ZERO,  0, "zero")

enum myenums{ MYMAP(MAP_AS_ENUM) };
char *mystrings[] = { MYMAP(MAP_AS_STRING) };
char myvalues[]={ MYMAP(MAP_AS_VALUE) };

//now you can use a binary search on mystrings to get the index
//which will correspond to the associated enum

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