1

I have trouble understanding why I do not get any output here. I've tested without a function and added it to the main function with luck.

I want to iterate the text file line by line and display it. I want to use the function printlines() to take a string/char parameter so that I can open it by the fopen() function.

Here's my code:

#include <stdio.h>

void printlines(const char *fname)
{
    FILE *fp = fopen(fname, "r");

    int c;
    while ((c == fgetc(fp)) != EOF) {
        putchar(c);
    }   

    fclose(fp);
}

int main()
{
    printlines("urls.txt"); 
    return 0;
}

I don't get any error messages in GCC. I compile like this:

gcc main.c -o main -g
  • 1
    Mybe the urls.txt file does not exist. Also check if fopen returns NULL. – Jabberwocky May 3 '16 at 16:41
  • 1
    As you compile with -g already: How does this look like when tracing the code using the GDB debugger? – alk May 3 '16 at 16:42
  • 3
    .... and it's while ((c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF) not while ((c == fgetc(fp)) != EOF) – Jabberwocky May 3 '16 at 16:43
  • Where is your check of the return from fopen?? – David C. Rankin May 3 '16 at 16:46
  • 1
    Good point @DavidC.Rankin, I will add that! – Doelal May 3 '16 at 16:52
4

while ((c == fgetc(fp)) != EOF) does no assignment. == should be replaced by = there.

  • Embarrassing that I missed that. Thanks! – Doelal May 3 '16 at 16:54
2

In addition to the conditional/assignment issue, when you are learning C (or any language) validate each required step. When you call printlines you have absolutely no way to know whether it succeeded or failed. (yes, you either get output or your don't, but that is well after the failure should have been caught and handled) Further, within printlines you start reading from the stream before you know if it is a valid open stream. You can protect against both with simple validations. For example:

#include <stdio.h>

int printlines(const char *fname)
{
    int c;
    FILE *fp = fopen(fname, "r");
    if (!fp)  /* validate file open, or return fail */
        return 0;

    while ((c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF) {
        putchar(c);
    }   

    fclose(fp);
    return 1;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    /* valdate successful return, or throw error */
    if (!printlines(argc > 1 ? argv[1] : "urls.txt")) {
        fprintf (stderr, "error: file open failed '%s'.\n",
                argc > 1 ? argv[1] : "urls.txt");
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

Now, by providing a simple integer return from printlines after validating fopen, you give yourself the ability to handle an open failure (back in the calling function) in the event a bad filename is passed. [1]

Example Use/Output

$ ./bin/validatefopen
error: file open failed 'urls.txt'.

$ ./bin/validatefopen ../dat/captnjack.txt
This is a tale
Of Captain Jack Sparrow
A Pirate So Brave
On the Seven Seas.

You should get in the habit of validating each step in your code where subsequent operation depends on successful completion of that step, or where any user input is involved.

footnotes:

[1.] that is also why a FILE * pointer is generally passed as a parameter to output routines rather than the filename. e.g. void printlines (FILE *fp) -- so the stream can be validated in the caller before the print routine is called.

Passing FILE* to printlines

As mentioned above, a more traditional approach (on several levels) would be to validate the open stream in the calling function (main here) before calling printlines. Additionally, rather than utilizing the ternary operator as the parameter for printlines, it allows assignment of the filename (either provided as the first argument to the program or urls.txt by default) outside the parameter list.

The ternary operator being similar to shorthand for if... else... in the form test ? if true code : if false code allows for using the first parameter as the filename while defaulting to urls.txt if none is given with const char *fn = argc > 1 ? argv[1] : "urls.txt";. Where argc > 1 is the test, argv[1] the if true code and "urls.txt" the string-literal used as the if false code. Compare both, and let me know if you have further questions.

#include <stdio.h>

void printlines (FILE *fp)
{
    int c;
    while ((c = fgetc(fp)) != EOF)
        putchar(c);
}

int main (int argc, char **argv) {

    const char *fn = argc > 1 ? argv[1] : "urls.txt";
    FILE *fp = fopen (fn, "r");
    if (!fp) {
        fprintf (stderr, "error: file open failed '%s'.\n", fn);
        return 1;
    }

    printlines (fp);

    fclose (fp);

    return 0;
}
  • Great info David. Shouldn't be returning 1 instead of 0 if the validation of the file opening is failing? – Doelal May 3 '16 at 19:27
  • It's up to you. I wanted the criteria in main to be if (!printlines... in that case it must return a 0 on fail. The only general 0/1 rule is you return 0 to the shell on success. The rest of the internal returns are up to you :) – David C. Rankin May 3 '16 at 20:35
  • Alright :) Really appreciated this answer. Thanks David! – Doelal May 3 '16 at 20:57
  • if (!printlines(argc > 1 ? argv[1] : "urls.txt")) { legit code and does the job. Yet a more classic coding is suggested. – chux May 3 '16 at 21:52
  • Grumble... Agreed, will add a more traditional example :) – David C. Rankin May 3 '16 at 22:43
0

You should also check to see if the file has been opened for reading

if ((fp = fopen(filename, "r")) == NULL)
{
    return;
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.