1

I am trying to create a generalised class in Swift, Xcode 7.3 (so Swift 2.2), but I can not seem to get it past the compiler:

protocol Struct1Protocol {
}

struct Struct1 {
    var name1: String
}

protocol Struct2Protocol {
}

struct Struct2: Struct2Protocol {
    var name2: String
}

class StructDependent<T> {
    func setupFrom<T:Struct1Protocol>(value: T) {
        print("we want to setup StructDependent with struct 1")
    }

    func setupFrom<T:Struct2Protocol>(value: T) {
        print("we want to setup StructDependent with struct 2")
    }
}

class A<T> {
    func test(value: T) {
        let structInstance = StructDependent<T>()
        // this gives a compiler error:
        // Cannot invoke 'setupFrom' with an argument list of type '(T)'
        structInstance.setupFrom(value)
    }
}

The idea is to have a StructDependent that can be set up from different structs. Class A should be able to call setupFrom if the class has been instantiated with a compatible struct. Like so:

let a = A<Struct1>()
let v = Struct1(name1: "")
a.test(v)

How would I go about this? I am a bit blocked here, so all ideas are welcome.

  • I don't know how that got in there, must have been in my copy paste buffer by accident. I corrected the sample code to what I have in Xcode. – Kristof Van Landschoot May 3 '16 at 18:27
  • Okay but it's still the same issue. There is nothing about value:T to tell the compiler that T adopts Struct1Protocol or Struct2Protocol. So how can it possibly be used where a Struct1Protocol or Struct2Protocol is required? – matt May 3 '16 at 18:29
  • Why do you not have Struct1 and Struct2 adopt the same protocol? That way you can type value:T as adopting that protocol too. – matt May 3 '16 at 18:31
  • I might be missing something here... the point is to have StructDependent execute different code when instantiated with a Struct1 than when it is instantiated with a Struct2. – Kristof Van Landschoot May 3 '16 at 18:33
  • But if Struct1 and Struct2 both adopt StructProtocol (the same protocol), then you can type value as constrained to a StructProtocol adopter and have setupFrom do different things depending on what it adopter it is. No need for generic here. – matt May 3 '16 at 18:41
3

It seems to me that you're way over-thinking this. I would take a much more simple-minded view of the case and do it entirely without generics; instead, we just use a protocol as a kind of supertype of the two structs (just as we would use a superclass if the structs were classes):

protocol StructProtocol {
    var name : String {get set}
    func setup()
}

struct Struct1 : StructProtocol{
    var name: String
    func setup() {}
}

struct Struct2 : StructProtocol {
    var name: String
    func setup() {}
}

class StructDependent {
    func setup(s:StructProtocol) {
        s.setup() // or not, I don't care...
        // or you could just switch on the type, e.g.:
        switch s {
        case is Struct1: // ...
        case is Struct2: // ...
        default: break
        }
    }
}

class A {
    func test(value: StructProtocol) {
        let structInstance = StructDependent()
        structInstance.setup(value)
    }
}

If StructDependent itself really needs to do different things depending on what setup is called with, it can switch on the actual type. But it would be better the first way, where we just call something that both Struct1 and Struct2 know how to do, each in its own way.

  • Looks like I was overthinking this indeed. Thanks!! – Kristof Van Landschoot May 3 '16 at 18:59
  • I revised so that Struct1 and Struct2 both have the name property, in case you were thinking of using that. Again, if this is imposed by the protocol, the compiler will happily let you fetch it from either of them under the protocol rubric. – matt May 3 '16 at 19:04
1

You need to put a type constraint on your generic type. You can use an all encompassing protocol for this constraint.

protocol StructProtocol {
}

protocol Struct1Protocol: StructProtocol {
}

struct Struct1: Struct1Protocol {
var name1: String
}

 protocol Struct2Protocol: StructProtocol {
}

struct Struct2: Struct2Protocol {
var name2: String
}



class StructDependent<T> {
func setupFrom<T:Struct1Protocol>(value: T) {
    print("we want to setup StructDependent with struct 1")
}

func setupFrom<T:Struct2Protocol>(value: T) {
    print("we want to setup StructDependent with struct 2")
}
}

class A<T: Struct1Protocol> {
func test(value: T) {
    let structInstance = StructDependent<T>()
    // this gives a compiler error:
    // Cannot invoke 'setupFrom' with an argument list of type '(T)'
    structInstance.setupFrom(value)
}
}

let a = A<Struct1>()
  • Yes, that was my first suggestion too (in my comments on the original question). But then applying Occam's razor to your answer, we get exactly my answer; they are effectively the same! Cool. – matt May 3 '16 at 19:06
  • Your answer helped me a bunch as well, R.P. !! It's a pity I can only accept one as correct on StackOverflow. – Kristof Van Landschoot May 3 '16 at 21:11
  • I am still not there yet. I managed to get things to compile, and I thought I was pretty well under way, but then it didn't work at runtime. I separated my code in a mini project. It all has to do with trying to build a bunch of general TableView code classes. So in the example, that you can download here dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/165243/tableviewgeneralization.zip there is a more concrete example of what I want to do. Any help still appreciated. – Kristof Van Landschoot May 4 '16 at 13:46
  • The output looks like this: buildConstraints should not happen setupFrom should not happen buildConstraints should not happen setupFrom should not happen and I was expecting more "building constraints on cell type a", and "building constraints on cell type b" and "setupFrom a" and "setupFrom b" – Kristof Van Landschoot May 4 '16 at 13:50
  • Made me a working solution with good old polymorphism instead of trying to use Protocol Oriented Programming. It works and is more or less the solution I envisioned!! :) If you're interested, a git-repo here: dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/165243/… with an initial commit of my initial attempt where polymorphism fails, then a commit where it works with polymorphism. It's not as nice in that you need to give a type as a parameter, but apart from that it's perfect IMO. Feedback still appreciated. – Kristof Van Landschoot May 4 '16 at 19:48

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