11

I've been reading through the code for QScopedPointer and came across something that I haven't been able to make sense of.

Here's the pertinent code from QScopedPointer on code.qt.io:

template <typename T, typename Cleanup = QScopedPointerDeleter<T> >
class QScopedPointer
{
    typedef T *QScopedPointer:: *RestrictedBool;
public:
...
#if defined(Q_QDOC)
    inline operator bool() const
    {
        return isNull() ? Q_NULLPTR : &QScopedPointer::d;
    }
#else
    inline operator RestrictedBool() const
    {
        return isNull() ? Q_NULLPTR : &QScopedPointer::d;
    }
#endif
...
inline bool isNull() const
{
    return !d;
}
...
protected:
    T *d;

I understand the preprocessor definition that makes QDoc think QScopedPointer has an operator bool instead of operator RestrictedBool. What I don't understand it what purpose RestrictedBool serves and how it does it. For example, a simpler implementation is:

inline operator bool() const
{
    return !isNull();
}

In short: What's happening here? Why is operator RestrictedBool underhandedly returning the address of d and why does it exist in the first place instead of operator bool?

  • 5
    I would say it is the Qt way of explicit operator bool (pre c++11). – Jarod42 May 3 '16 at 19:26
  • 2
    it is restricted to explicit conversions – formerlyknownas_463035818 May 3 '16 at 19:28
  • 2
    this made me find this which seems to explain the idea behind it – formerlyknownas_463035818 May 3 '16 at 19:31
  • @tobi303: that does explain it, thank you. I'll accept if you or someone else wishes to write it up as an answer. – Jon Harper May 3 '16 at 19:46
  • I should summarize if I have it correctly: operator bool returns an rvalue of bool that can be used for other operations. RestrictedBool is a private typedef of a pointer to d. Using it as the type for an operator means it can be used in an if statement, but not with other comparison operators. – Jon Harper May 3 '16 at 19:54
9

This is an implementation of the Safe Bool Idiom, explained here.

The naive implementation:

inline operator bool() const
{
    return !isNull();
}

returns an rvalue of bool that can be implicitly used for other operations, e.g.

QScopedPointer<Foo> foo(nullptr);
int i = 1;
if (foo < i)
    ...

is valid code.

Summary: RestrictedBool is a private typedef of a pointer to the type of d. Using it as the return type for an operator means it can be used in an if statement (if (foo)), but cannot be used with other operators.

Note: C++11 allows the use of explicit operator bool, which eliminates the need for the Safe Bool Idiom in C++11 or later code. An implementation for QScopedPointer in C++11 might look like this:

explicit operator bool() const
{
    return !isNull();
}

Thank you to tobi303 and Jarod42 for providing the basis for this answer.

Further reading regarding C++11 and the Safe Bool Idiom:

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