610

I'm writing a program that parses 10 websites, locates data files, saves the files, and then parses them to make data that can be readily used in the NumPy library. There are tons of errors this file encounters through bad links, poorly formed XML, missing entries, and other things I've yet to categorize. I initially made this program to handle errors like this:

try:
    do_stuff()
except:
    pass

But now I want to log errors:

try:
    do_stuff()
except Exception, err:
    print Exception, err

Note this is printing to a log file for later review. This usually prints very useless data. What I want is to print the exact same lines printed when the error triggers without the try-except intercepting the exception, but I don't want it to halt my program since it is nested in a series of for loops that I would like to see to completion.

12 Answers 12

433

Some other answer have already pointed out the traceback module.

Please notice that with print_exc, in some corner cases, you will not obtain what you would expect. In Python 2.x:

import traceback

try:
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
except Exception, err:
    try:
        raise TypeError("Again !?!")
    except:
        pass

    traceback.print_exc()

...will display the traceback of the last exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "e.py", line 7, in <module>
    raise TypeError("Again !?!")
TypeError: Again !?!

If you really need to access the original traceback one solution is to cache the exception infos as returned from exc_info in a local variable and display it using print_exception:

import traceback
import sys

try:
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
except Exception, err:
    try:
        exc_info = sys.exc_info()

        # do you usefull stuff here
        # (potentially raising an exception)
        try:
            raise TypeError("Again !?!")
        except:
            pass
        # end of useful stuff


    finally:
        # Display the *original* exception
        traceback.print_exception(*exc_info)
        del exc_info

Producing:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "t.py", line 6, in <module>
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
TypeError: Oups!

Few pitfalls with this though:

  • From the doc of sys_info:

    Assigning the traceback return value to a local variable in a function that is handling an exception will cause a circular reference. This will prevent anything referenced by a local variable in the same function or by the traceback from being garbage collected. [...] If you do need the traceback, make sure to delete it after use (best done with a try ... finally statement)

  • but, from the same doc:

    Beginning with Python 2.2, such cycles are automatically reclaimed when garbage collection is enabled and they become unreachable, but it remains more efficient to avoid creating cycles.


On the other hand, by allowing you to access the traceback associated with an exception, Python 3 produce a less surprising result:

import traceback

try:
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
except Exception as err:
    try:
        raise TypeError("Again !?!")
    except:
        pass

    traceback.print_tb(err.__traceback__)

... will display:

  File "e3.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise TypeError("Oups!")
617

traceback.format_exc() or sys.exc_info() will yield more info if that's what you want.

import traceback
import sys

try:
    do_stuff()
except Exception:
    print(traceback.format_exc())
    # or
    print(sys.exc_info()[0])
200

If you're debugging and just want to see the current stack trace, you can simply call:

traceback.print_stack()

There's no need to manually raise an exception just to catch it again.

  • 8
    The traceback module does exactly that - raise and catch an exception. – pppery Nov 7 '15 at 19:08
  • 1
    Output goes to STDERR by default BTW. Wasn't appearing in my logs because it was being redirected somewhere else. – mpen Dec 11 '18 at 0:18
74

How to print the full traceback without halting the program?

When you don't want to halt your program on an error, you need to handle that error with a try/except:

try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception as error:
    handle_the_error(error)

To extract the full traceback, we'll use the traceback module from the standard library:

import traceback

And to create a decently complicated stacktrace to demonstrate that we get the full stacktrace:

def raise_error():
    raise RuntimeError('something bad happened!')

def do_something_that_might_error():
    raise_error()

Printing

To print the full traceback, use the traceback.print_exc method:

try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception as error:
    traceback.print_exc()

Which prints:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!

Better than printing, logging:

However, a best practice is to have a logger set up for your module. It will know the name of the module and be able to change levels (among other attributes, such as handlers)

import logging
logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG)
logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)

In which case, you'll want the logger.exception function instead:

try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception as error:
    logger.exception(error)

Which logs:

ERROR:__main__:something bad happened!
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!

Or perhaps you just want the string, in which case, you'll want the traceback.format_exc function instead:

try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception as error:
    logger.debug(traceback.format_exc())

Which logs:

DEBUG:__main__:Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!

Conclusion

And for all three options, we see we get the same output as when we have an error:

>>> do_something_that_might_error()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in do_something_that_might_error
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in raise_error
RuntimeError: something bad happened!
  • 2
    as said above and for me too, traceback.print_exc() returns only the last call : how do you succeed to return several level of the stack (and possibly all levele s?) – geekobi Nov 22 '17 at 16:08
  • @geekobi I'm not sure what you're asking here. I demonstrate that we get the traceback up to the entry point of the program/interpreter. What are you not clear on? – Aaron Hall Nov 22 '17 at 16:59
  • 1
    What @geekobi is saying is if you catch and re-raise, traceback.print_exc() will just return the re-raise stack, not the original stack. – fizloki Aug 22 '18 at 1:38
  • @fizloki how are you "reraising"? Are you doing a bare raise or exception chaining, or are you hiding the original traceback? see stackoverflow.com/questions/2052390/… – Aaron Hall Aug 22 '18 at 2:35
11

First, don't use prints for logging, there is astable, proven and well-thought out stdlib module to do that: logging. You definitely should use it instead.

Second, don't be tempted to do a mess with unrelated tools when there is native and simple approach. Here it is:

log = logging.getLogger(__name__)

try:
    call_code_that_fails()
except MyError:
    log.exception('Any extra info you want to see in your logs')

That's it. You are done now.

Explanation for anyone who is interested in how things work under the hood

What log.exception is actually doing is just a call to log.error (that is, log event with level ERROR) and print traceback then.

Why is it better?

Well, here is some considerations:

  • it is just right;
  • it is straightforward;
  • it is simple.

Why should nobody use traceback or call logger with exc_info=True or get their hands dirty with sys.exc_info?

Well, just because! They all exist for different purposes. For example, traceback.print_exc's output is a little bit different from tracebacks produced by the interpreter itself. If you use it, you will confuse anyone who reads your logs, they will be banging their heads against them.

Passing exc_info=True to log calls is just inappropriate. But, it is useful when catching recoverable errors and you want to log them (using, e.g INFO level) with tracebacks as well, because log.exception produces logs of only one level - ERROR.

And you definitely should avoid messing with sys.exc_info as much as you can. It's just not a public interface, it's an internal one - you can use it if you definitely know what you are doing. It is not intended for just printing exceptions.

  • 2
    I recommend this one over others, it is more stable and well structured more than some random prints – A.Raouf Jan 27 at 1:04
  • It also doesn't work as-is. That's not it. I'm not done now: this answer just wastes time. – A. Rager Apr 27 at 16:07
  • I don't know what you mean by "work as-is", though. – tosh May 13 at 15:05
  • I would also add that you can just do logging.exception(). No need to create instance of log unless you have special requirements. – Shital Shah May 18 at 6:35
7

In addition to @Aaron Hall's answer, if you are logging, but don't want to use logging.exception() (since it logs at the ERROR level), you can use a lower level and pass exc_info=True. e.g.

try:
    do_something_that_might_error()
except Exception:
    logger.info('General exception noted.', exc_info=True)
6

You will need to put the try/except inside the most innerloop where the error may occur, i.e.

for i in something:
    for j in somethingelse:
        for k in whatever:
            try:
                something_complex(i, j, k)
            except Exception, e:
                print e
        try:
            something_less_complex(i, j)
        except Exception, e:
            print e

... and so on

In other words, you will need to wrap statements that may fail in try/except as specific as possible, in the most inner-loop as possible.

6

To get the precise stack trace, as a string, that would have been raised if no try/except were there to step over it, simply place this in the except block that catches the offending exception.

desired_trace = traceback.format_exc(sys.exc_info())

Here's how to use it (assuming flaky_func is defined, and log calls your favorite logging system):

import traceback
import sys

try:
    flaky_func()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    raise
except Exception:
    desired_trace = traceback.format_exc(sys.exc_info())
    log(desired_trace)

It's a good idea to catch and re-raise KeyboardInterrupts, so that you can still kill the program using Ctrl-C. Logging is outside the scope of the question, but a good option is logging. Documentation for the sys and traceback modules.

  • 3
    This doesn't work in Python 3 and needs to be changed to desired_trace = traceback.format_exc(). Passing sys.exc_info() as the argument was never the correct thing to do, but gets silently ignored in Python 2—but not in Python 3 (3.6.4 anyway). – martineau Feb 6 '18 at 18:54
  • 1
    KeyboardInterrupt is not derived (directly or indirectly) from Exception. (Both are derived from BaseException.) This means except Exception: will never catch a KeyboardInterrupt, and thus the except KeyboardInterrupt: raise is completely unnecessary. – AJNeufeld Aug 17 '18 at 20:56
5

A remark about this answer's comments: print(traceback.format_exc()) does a better job for me than traceback.print_exc(). With the latter, the hello is sometimes strangely "mixed" with the traceback text, like if both want to write to stdout or stderr at the same time, producing weird output (at least when building from inside a text editor and viewing the output in the "Build results" panel).

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "C:\Users\User\Desktop\test.py", line 7, in
hell do_stuff()
File "C:\Users\User\Desktop\test.py", line 4, in do_stuff
1/0
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero
o
[Finished in 0.1s]

So I use:

import traceback, sys

def do_stuff():
    1/0

try:
    do_stuff()
except Exception:
    print(traceback.format_exc())
    print('hello')
3

You want the traceback module. It will let you print stack dumps like Python normally does. In particular, the print_last function will print the last exception and a stack trace.

1

I don't see this mentioned in any of the other answers. If you're passing around an Exception object for whatever reason...

In Python 3.5+ you can get a trace from an Exception object using traceback.TracebackException.from_exception(). For example:

import traceback


def stack_lvl_3():
    raise Exception('a1', 'b2', 'c3')


def stack_lvl_2():
    try:
        stack_lvl_3()
    except Exception as e:
        # raise
        return e


def stack_lvl_1():
    e = stack_lvl_2()
    return e

e = stack_lvl_1()

tb1 = traceback.TracebackException.from_exception(e)
print(''.join(tb1.format()))

However, the above code results in:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "exc.py", line 10, in stack_lvl_2
    stack_lvl_3()
  File "exc.py", line 5, in stack_lvl_3
    raise Exception('a1', 'b2', 'c3')
Exception: ('a1', 'b2', 'c3')

This is just two levels of the stack, as opposed to what would have been printed on screen had the exception been raised in stack_lvl_2() and not intercepted (uncomment the # raise line).

As I understand it, that's because an exception records only the current level of the stack when it is raised, stack_lvl_3() in this case. As it's passed back up through the stack, more levels are being added to its __traceback__. But we intercepted it in stack_lvl_2(), meaning all it got to record was levels 3 and 2. To get the full trace as printed on stdout we'd have to catch it at the highest (lowest?) level:

import traceback


def stack_lvl_3():
    raise Exception('a1', 'b2', 'c3')


def stack_lvl_2():
    stack_lvl_3()


def stack_lvl_1():
    stack_lvl_2()


try:
    stack_lvl_1()
except Exception as exc:
    tb = traceback.TracebackException.from_exception(exc)

print('Handled at stack lvl 0')
print(''.join(tb.stack.format()))

Which results in:

Handled at stack lvl 0
  File "exc.py", line 17, in <module>
    stack_lvl_1()
  File "exc.py", line 13, in stack_lvl_1
    stack_lvl_2()
  File "exc.py", line 9, in stack_lvl_2
    stack_lvl_3()
  File "exc.py", line 5, in stack_lvl_3
    raise Exception('a1', 'b2', 'c3')

Notice that the stack print is different, the first and last lines are missing. Because it's a different format().

Intercepting the exception as far away from the point where it was raised as possible makes for simpler code while also giving more information.

0

Get the full traceback as a string from the exception object with traceback.format_exception

If you only have the exception object, you can get the traceback as a string from any point of the code in Python 3 with:

import traceback

''.join(traceback.format_exception(None, exc_obj, exc_obj.__traceback__))

Full example:

#!/usr/bin/env python3

import traceback

def f():
    g()

def g():
    raise Exception('asdf')

try:
    g()
except Exception as e:
    exc = e

tb_str = ''.join(traceback.format_exception(None, exc_obj, exc_obj.__traceback__))
print(tb_str)

Output:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./main.py", line 12, in <module>
    g()
  File "./main.py", line 9, in g
    raise Exception('asdf')
Exception: asdf

Documentation: https://docs.python.org/3.7/library/traceback.html#traceback.format_exception

See also: Extract traceback info from an exception object

Tested in Python 3.7.3.

protected by cs95 Sep 21 '17 at 6:15

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