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I have been reading about Iterators in the python 2.7.x Documentation The given sample program in the link defines a __iter__ method to make the class "iterable".

However, i cannot find any use of __iter__ method defined in the class, i.e. to say- Even if i don't define __iter__ , i can still iterate upon the object of the class.

Code 1 # From the documentation

class Reverse:
    """Iterator for looping over a sequence backwards."""
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.data = data
        self.index = len(data)
    def __iter__(self):
        return self
    def next(self):
        if self.index == 0:
            raise StopIteration
        self.index = self.index - 1
        return self.data[self.index]

Code 2 # Except for defining the iter method it's the same.

class ReverseMod:
    """Iterator for looping over a sequence backwards."""
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.data = data
        self.index = len(data)
    # Missing __iter__()
    def next(self):
        if self.index == 0:
            raise StopIteration
        self.index = self.index - 1
        return self.data[self.index]

Output:

rev = Reverse('spam')
revMod = ReverseMod('spam')

rev.next() #m
rev.next() #a
rev.next() #p
...

revMod.next() #m
revMod.next() #a
revMod.next() #p
...

Objects from class Reverse and ReverseMod behave the same way. Only thing is when i do a iter(revMod) it says

TypeError: iteration over non-sequence

Why do i even need to concern myself about doing iter(revMod)? Why do i need to care defining __iter__ at all. Seems like i can get the functionalities of doing a .next() without defining __iter__ at all.

marked as duplicate by jonrsharpe python May 4 '16 at 17:17

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  • 1
    Have you tried for x in rev: and for x in revMod:? What happened? What can you conclude about __iter__? – Vincent Savard May 4 '16 at 17:18
  • Reverse is both an iterator and an iterable, ReverseMod is only the former – jonrsharpe May 4 '16 at 17:18
  • 2
    "Seems like i can get the functionalities of doing a .next() without defining __iter__ at all." - yes, but that's not the point. Nobody wants to call next themselves; they want to perform for loops, or pass objects to list, or do other things that won't work with ReverseMod. – user2357112 May 4 '16 at 17:19
  • 1
    @jonrsharpe: Strictly speaking, an object that provides next but not __iter__ doesn't meet Python's definition of an iterator, even though it provides similar functionality. For example, isinstance(obj, collections.Iterator) will report that such an object is not an iterator. – user2357112 May 4 '16 at 17:23
  • 1
    @PM2Ring: Bad move. If you want something to support iterating over it repeatedly like that, it's much better to make __iter__ create a separate object. Making an iterator's __iter__ implicitly reset the iterator breaks a few corner cases with next-ing an iterator before you loop over it or continuing an iteration in a new loop, and it doesn't handle the common case of wanting to perform nested loops over a single object. – user2357112 May 4 '16 at 18:38

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