6

So that:

template <bool Mode>
void doIt()
{
   //many lines
   template_if(Mode)
   {
      doSomething(); // and not waste resources on if
   }
   //many other lines
}

I know there is enable_if command that can be used for enabling the function conditionally, but I do not think I can use it such option here. Essentially what I need is template construct that acts as #ifdef macro.

7
  • they arent meant to work like that – Netwave May 5 '16 at 10:51
  • 1
    In C++17, you can say if constexpr (Mode) { /* ... */ }. – Kerrek SB May 5 '16 at 10:52
  • 1
    you can use policy based design for this, have another class (which actually calls doSomething() and only call doSomething() in specialized version of whatever Mode is – Nim May 5 '16 at 10:52
  • 1
    why not? functions can be enabled and disabled depending on template parameters - how is that different? – Draif Kroneg May 5 '16 at 10:52
  • 2
    Any decent compiler will optimize out if(Mode) in release builds. The question is if you need doSomething to be compilable when Mode is false. – sbabbi May 5 '16 at 11:06
4

Before trying something complex it's often worth checking if the simple solution already achieves what you want.

The simplest thing I can think of is to just use an if:

#include <iostream>

void doSomething()
{
  std::cout << "doing it!" << std::endl;
}

template <bool Mode>
void doIt()
{
   //many lines
   if(Mode)
   {
      doSomething(); // and not waste resources on if
   }
   //many other lines
}

void dont()
{
  doIt<false>();
}

void actuallyDoIt()
{
  doIt<true>();
}

So what does that give:

gcc 5.3 with no optimizations enabled gives:

void doIt<false>():
    pushq   %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    nop
    popq    %rbp
    ret
void doIt<true>():
    pushq   %rbp
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
    call    doSomething()
    nop
    popq    %rbp
    ret

Note no doSomething() call in the false case just the bare work of the doIt function call. Turning optimizations on would eliminate even that. So we already get what we want and are not wasting anything in the if. It's probably good to leave it at that rather than adding any unneeded complexity.

1

It can sort of be done.

If the code inside your "if" is syntactically and semantically valid for the full set of template arguments that you intend to provide, then you can basically just write an if statement. Thanks to basic optimisations, if (someConstant) { .. } is not going to survive compilation when someConstant is false. And that's that.

However, if the conditional code is actually not valid when the condition isn't met, then you can't do this. That's because class templates and function templates are instantiated ... in full. Your entire function body is instantiated so it all has to be valid. There's no such thing as instantiating an arbitrary block of code.

So, in that case, you'd have to go back to messy old function specialisation with enable_if or whatever.


C++17 is likely to have if constexpr which essentially gives you exactly this. But that's future talk.

3
  • "There's no such thing as instantiating an arbitrary block of code.†" -- what about polymorphic lambdas in C++14? – melak47 May 5 '16 at 11:26
  • It does, but requires some boilerplate to make the expressions dependent. – melak47 May 5 '16 at 11:28
  • @melak47: Ahahaha "some boilerplate" :P – Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '16 at 11:35
1

You could specialize your template so that your code is only used when the template parameter is true:

template < typename _Cond > struct condition {};

template <> struct condition<false> {
    static /* constexpr */ void do_something() {};
}

template <> struct condition<true> {
    static void do_something() {
      // Actual code
    }
}

// Usage:
condition<true>::do_something();
condition<compiletime_constant>::do_something();
7
  • Why? This will even prevent the code from being compiled – tobspr May 5 '16 at 11:09
  • Recommending macros... and I don't think you really grokked the purpose of the question. Mode is a template argument, not a macro definition. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '16 at 11:09
  • 1
    Removed the last paragraph :P I don't see whats wrong with the template based solution though – tobspr May 5 '16 at 11:10
  • That part's fine :) (or as fine as it can be in C++ anyway!) – Lightness Races in Orbit May 5 '16 at 11:12
  • 1
    @tobspr: 'This will even prevent the code from being compiled' - not quite. The code must parse as valid template code, even if it's never instantiated. – Jeremy May 5 '16 at 12:03

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