2

This question already has an answer here:

I have a simple class which will be useful for me with generating random numbers using default_random_engine.

Random.h:

#include <random>

using namespace std;

class Random
{
    public:
        Random();
        ~Random() {}
    private:
        static default_random_engine _engine;
};

Random.cpp:

#include "Random.h"

Random::Random()
{
    _engine = default_random_engine{}; //Will this be initialized every time I create an object of type Random?
}

Will _engine be initialized every time I create an object of type Random? I just want it to stay like it is after the first initialization because I was told I can use the same engine multiple times.

marked as duplicate by Baum mit Augen c++ May 5 '16 at 15:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • @NathanOliver Thanks, you helped me understand. – AnDrOiD May 5 '16 at 15:02
  • 2
    If that using namespace std; is there for reasons other than making the code in this very question shorter: Please don't. Putting it in a .cpp is already bad enough, but in headers, it's rather unacceptable. – Baum mit Augen May 5 '16 at 15:04
  • 1
    @BaummitAugen Thanks for letting me know! – AnDrOiD May 5 '16 at 15:08
3

Will _engine be initialized every time I create an object of type Random?

Yes.

I just want it to stay like it is after the first initialization

In which case, you should define it like so:

#include "Random.h"

std::default_random_engine Random::_engine;

Without this, even your original version won't compile (as you've not defined the static member).

  • He needs to define it like that regardless. In order to get his desired result, he simply needs to not reassign it in his constructor (or anywhere else). – Benjamin Lindley May 5 '16 at 15:02
  • @BenjaminLindley true, I'll add this to my answer, thanks! :) – OMGtechy May 5 '16 at 15:04
0

The link @NathanOliver provided in my question helped me understand, which is to make a global variable of that type in the source file:

#include "random.h"

default_random_engine Question::_engine = default_random_engine{};

Random::Random() {  }

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