My original goal was to be able to use classpath dependencies defined in buildscript in build.gradle, inside a script that was imported into build.gradle using apply from:. However, the external script didn't compile since the classes could not be resolved. After researching the issue, I found out that the logic needs to be duplicated and so I thought I would extract buildscript into a separate file. Then I would be able to apply that inside build.gradle and also inside the external script.

I didn't even get past successfully applying the external buildscript file from build.gradle, let alone applying it from the external script. I've tried multiple things, but it seems like I always end up with one of two problems no matter what I try: either properties from gradle.properties cannot be used, or the plugin cannot be found (even though the classpath dependency has been defined).

Currently my gradle/buildscript.gradle file looks like this:

buildscript {
    repositories {
        maven { url "http://some.url.com" }
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath "my.gradle.plugin:gradle-plugin:1.0.0"
        classpath "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
    }
}

libraryVersion has been defined in gradle.properties. My build.gradle is as follows:

buildscript {
    apply from: "gradle/buildscript.gradle"
}

apply plugin: 'my.gradle.plugin.PluginClass'

When I do this, gradle complains that it cannot find a plugin with id my.gradle.plugin.PluginClass. I tried removing the quotes, and I also trying project.plugin.apply(...) using the plugin's FQN with and without quotes; both of these caused gradle to error out with a message saying that it could not find the property my on the root project.

I also tried:

buildscript {
    apply from: "gradle/buildscript.gradle", to: buildscript
}

apply plugin: 'my.gradle.PluginClass'

But this causes another error where gradle complains that it cannot resolve libraryVersion in gradle/buildscript.gradle. So I then tried this:

buildscript {
    ext.libraryVersion = "1.0.1"

    repositories {
        maven { url "http://some.url.com" }
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath "my.gradle.plugin:gradle-plugin:1.0.0"
        classpath "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
    }
}

Which causes another error, where gradle says that there is no such property ext on buildscript. I understand that this is because there really is no "project" to speak of yet, since buildscript is compiled separately. Then I changed my buildscript block in build.gradle back to:

buildscript {
    apply from: "gradle/buildscript.gradle"
}

Now I don't get the ext error, but I still get an error saying that it cannot find the plugin with the specified id.

I cannot hardcode libraryVersion inside buildscript, because I need it as a compile-time dependency in build.gradle and I'd rather not have to maintain it in two places.

This is extremely confusing and frustrating, because the following buildscript block works fine by itself in build.gradle:

buildscript {
    ext.libraryVersion = "1.0.1"

    repositories {
        maven { url "http://some.url.com" }
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath "my.gradle.plugin:gradle-plugin:1.0.0"
        classpath "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
    }
}

apply plugin: 'my-plugin-id' //No need to use FQN

dependencies {
    compile "my.library:library-version:$libraryVersion"
}

The reason I tried to split out the buildscript block is because I have a file other.gradle that has some custom tasks that use classes from my.library:

import my.library.SomeThing

task customTask(type: DefaultTask) {
    //does something with SomeThing
}

But when I leave the buildscript block in build.gradle and apply the other file like so:

buildscript {
    ext.libraryVersion = "1.0.1"

    repositories {
        maven { url "http://some.url.com" }
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath "my.gradle.plugin:gradle-plugin:1.0.0"
        classpath "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
    }
}

apply plugin: 'my-plugin-id' //No need to use FQN

dependencies {
    compile "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
}

apply from: 'gradle/other.gradle'

I get an error from gradle saying that it cannot resolve the class my.library.SomeThing. I figured I could solve this and avoid duplication by having a common buildscript file that I could then apply in both build.gradle and other.gradle.

I created a custom plugin inside buildSrc to configure the project the way I wanted it, only to end up with a more complicated way to fail with the same result. The root cause was the same: there was no way to expose classpath dependencies to external scripts.

Is there comprehensive documentation regarding this sorts of behavior? Everything about this violates the principle of least-surprise. I would expect a buildscript block that is being used in build.gradle to "just work" when I move it to another file.

The semantics of apply with respect to buildscript blocks is not clear. In addition, the semantics of buildscript itself when it appears in an external file are not clear either - there is a marked variation in behavior, especially with respect to plugins and external properties.

What is the best way to deal with this?

  • Controlling buildscript from an external script is inexplicably complicated/issue-prone in Gradle. See: issues.gradle.org/browse/GRADLE-2801 – RaGe May 5 '16 at 20:08
  • Yeah, I did run into that. The core issue for me is exposing classpath dependencies from the buildscript block, to multiple gradle files. Even when doing this in a buildscript block in build.gradle, it doesn't seem to work. The external files cannot resolve classes that come from the buildscript's classpath. – Vivin Paliath May 5 '16 at 20:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a bit of a rant, but there is also a solution. I was able to solve this without using a separate buildscript file, but the workaround is unbelievably hackish. I think it's a major downside that you cannot share buildscript dependencies across external scripts.

The problem is that there is no semantic consistency because behavior seems to be dependent on how you decide to organize/modularize your build-logic. If this is a known problem, it needs to be specifically called out in the documentation somewhere - the only way I've been able to find mentions of this sort of surprising behavior is from gradle's own forums or from StackOverflow. I don't think it is unreasonable to expect a build which works with discrete units of build-logic in a single file, to also work when those discrete units are split across multiple files. Build logic shouldn't vary based on how you have decided to organize your files, as long as the semantics are consistent.

I understand that there may be technical limitations, but having builds break just because you moved logic from one file into another file is abstraction leakage because now I am required to know details and intricacies of doing so, beyond what one should be reasonably expected to know. I wouldn't even mind if this was explicitly and specifically called out, along with solutions/workarounds to bridge the disparity in semantics. However, current documentation regarding organizing build-logic mentions none of these caveats; it only documents the happy path.

/rant

So here's the solution. I saved a reference to the class itself by using extensions:

import my.library.SomeThing
import my.library.SomeOtherThing

buildscript {
    ext.libraryVersion = "1.0.1"

    repositories {
        maven { url "http://some.url.com" }
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath "my.gradle.plugin:gradle-plugin:1.0.0"
        classpath "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
    }
}

apply plugin: 'my-plugin-id' //No need to use FQN

ext.SomeThing = SomeThing
ext.SomeOtherThing = SomeOtherThing

dependencies {
    compile "my.library:my-library:$libraryVersion"
}

apply from: 'gradle/other.gradle'

Then in other.gradle:

// Necessary; you can't just use ext.SomeThing in the task later because 
// it is available at compile-time, but apparently not at runtime. Although
// it does work if you use project.ext.SomeThing. However, I just found this
// to be more convenient.
def SomeThing = ext.SomeThing
def SomeOtherThing = ext.SomeOtherThing

task someTask(type: DefaultTask) {
    // You have to use def; you cannot use the actual type because
    // it is not available at compile-time. Also, since you only
    // have a class object, you cannot use "new" directly; you have to
    // create a new instance by calling newInstance() on the class object
    def someThing = SomeThing.newInstance(...)

    // If you are calling static methods you can invoke them directly
    // on the class object. Again, you have to use def if the return
    // type is something defined within my-library.
    def foo = SomeOtherThing.staticMethod(...)
}
  • 1
    +1 For your effort, and agreed on your rant, however things are constantly improving in this aspect of Gradle. Right now it even says in the docs, that buildscript dependencies would be inherited, but I have yet to confirm that ;) – Thomas Hirsch Jun 13 '17 at 13:29

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