14

I've 2 array of objects that I'd deeply compare with lodash

However, I've a prob with it:

> var x = [{a:1, b:2}, {c:3, d:4}];
> var y = [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}];
> _.difference(x,y, _.isEqual);
[ { a: 1, b: 2 }, { c: 3, d: 4 } ]

How should I compare to see that both are equal?

  • Array of arrays is possible to sort. Array of objects is not. – Archer May 6 '16 at 6:46
32

You can make use of differenceWith() with an isEqual() comparator, and invoke isEmpty to check if they are equal or not.

var isArrayEqual = function(x, y) {
  return _(x).differenceWith(y, _.isEqual).isEmpty();
};

var result1 = isArrayEqual(
  [{a:1, b:2}, {c:3, d:4}],
  [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}]
);

var result2 = isArrayEqual(
  [{a:1, b:2, c: 1}, {c:3, d:4}],
  [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}]
);

document.write([
  '<div><label>result1: ', result1, '</label></div>',
  '<div><label>result2: ', result2, '</label></div>',
].join(''));
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.11.2/lodash.js"></script>

UPDATE June 22, 2018

This update is in response to the comment below:

@ryeballar if any of the array is undefined it returns true. How would you solve this. Thanks in advance buddy

As stated in the differenceWith documentation:

The order and references of result values are determined by the first array.

This means that as long as all the items in the first array will match everything else in the second array, then the resulting array from the differenceWith invocation will be empty.

An alternative solution that truly solves the problem is to use xorWith() with the same chain of functions from the solution above.

var isArrayEqual = function(x, y) {
  return _(x).xorWith(y, _.isEqual).isEmpty();
};

var result1 = isArrayEqual(
  [{a:1, b:2}, {c:3, d:4}],
  [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}]
);

var result2 = isArrayEqual(
  [{a:1, b:2, c: 1}, {c:3, d:4}],
  [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}]
);

var result3 = isArrayEqual(
  [{a:1, b:2, c: 1}, {c:3, d:4}],
  [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}, undefined]
);

console.log('result1:', result1);
console.log('result2:', result2);
console.log('result3:', result3);
.as-console-wrapper{min-height:100%;top:0}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.10/lodash.min.js"></script>

  • Thanks @ryeballar . Basically I really need to find diff between them, so _.difference should be just replaced with _.differenceWith with _.isEqual comparator. – Archer May 6 '16 at 6:54
  • 3
    I've never seen syntax for _(foo) mentioned anywhere in lodash. Where is this in the docs? – Don P May 19 '17 at 19:28
  • 2
    @DonP You may refer to this part of the lodash documentation. – ryeballar May 20 '17 at 0:48
  • 1
    @ryeballar if any of the array is undefined it returns true. How would you solve this. Thanks in advance buddy – Uzumaki Naruto Jun 22 '18 at 12:10
  • @UzumakiNaruto I added an update, this answer is already quite outdated. – ryeballar Jun 22 '18 at 13:27
3

I prefer pure JS since i haven't got the patience to learn underscore or lodash. So i invent something i have been long dreaming of. The Object.prototype.compare(). The v0.0.2 is doing only shallow comparison though but adequate for this question.

Object.prototype.compare = function(o){
  var ok = Object.keys(this);
  return typeof o === "object" && ok.length === Object.keys(o).length ? ok.every(k => this[k] === o[k]) : false;
};
var obj1 = {a:1,b:2,c:3},
    obj2 = {c:3,a:1,b:2},
    obj3 = {b:2,c:3,a:7};

document.write ("<pre>" + obj1.compare(obj2) + "</pre>\n");
document.write ("<pre>" + obj2.compare(obj3) + "</pre>\n");
document.write ("<pre>" + new Object({a:1, b:2, c:3}).compare({c:3,b:2,a:1,d:0}) + "</pre>\n");

Cool... So then lets continue with the question... I guess... since we already have an Object.prototype.compare() there should be absolutely no harm in the invention of Array.prototype.compare(). Lets make it more clever this time. It shall tell primitives from objects. One other thing is, arrays are ordered; so in my book [1,2] is not equal to [2,1]. Also this makes the job simpler.

Object.prototype.compare = function(o){
  var ok = Object.keys(this);
  return typeof o === "object" && ok.length === Object.keys(o).length ? ok.every(k => this[k] === o[k]) : false;
};
Array.prototype.compare = function(a){
  return this.every((e,i) => typeof a[i] === "object" ? a[i].compare(e) : a[i] === e);
}
var x = [{a:1, b:2}, {c:3, d:4}],
    y = [{b:2, a:1}, {d:4, c:3}],
    a = [1,2,3,4,5],
    b = [1,2,3,4,5],
    p = "fourtytwo",
    r = "thirtyseven",
    n = 42,
    m = 37;
document.writeln(x.compare(y)); // the question is answered here
document.writeln(a.compare(b));
document.writeln(p.compare(r)); // these primitives end up at Object prototype
document.writeln(n.compare(m)); // so modify Object.prototype.compare () accordingly

  • 1
    Your solution looks cool, thanks. However: new Object({a:1, b:2, c:3}).compare({c:3,b:2,a:1,d:0}); returns true, but should be false Same problems with deep object comparison. I'd prefer existing lodash solution. – Archer May 12 '16 at 7:51
  • @Archer: hmm cool.. that's why it's v0.0.1. Seems we have to add a check for Object.keys().length stage too. – Redu May 12 '16 at 7:55
  • @Archer: did a quick fix. I guess next stage could be to make it dive deeper recursively, hand to hand with it's twin Array.prototype.compare() – Redu May 12 '16 at 8:17
  • 2
    @Archer Well may be... But I am a very library agnostic person. Think it this way, if you need a banana you wouldn't like a gorilla knocking at your door holding a banana with the whole jungle behind... – Redu May 12 '16 at 17:27
  • 2
    Nice effort but there's a god-like term for these cases: 'Don't reinvent the wheel'. Anyway, javascript es6 should natively include array and object comparisons with shallow and deep flags in my humble opinion. – tommyalvarez May 10 '18 at 0:11
2

Following @ryeballar answer, if you only want to import specific lodash methods you can use this notation:

import { isEmpty, isEqual, xorWith } from 'lodash';


export const isArrayEqual = (x, y) => isEmpty(xorWith(x, y, isEqual));

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