140

Given a jenkins build pipeline, jenkins injects a variable env into the node{}. Variable env holds environment variables and values.

I want to print all env properties within the jenkins pipeline. However, I do no not know all env properties ahead of time.

For example, environment variable BRANCH_NAME can be printed with code

node {
    echo ${env.BRANCH_NAME}
    ...

But again, I don't know all variables ahead of time. I want code that handles that, something like

node {
    for(e in env){
        echo e + " is " + ${e}
    }
    ...

which would echo something like

 BRANCH_NAME is myBranch2
 CHANGE_ID is 44
 ...

I used Jenkins 2.1 for this example.

6
  • 1
    env is a map. Did you try normal iteration? like -- env.each{ println it }
    – Jayan
    May 7, 2016 at 2:20
  • 3
    Looks like a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/36836806/… May 7, 2016 at 8:54
  • 3
    Afaik env just encapsulates the environment variables. I dont think you can loop through it. Try 'sh env' on linux/ 'bat set' on windows. May 7, 2016 at 16:41
  • 1
    @Renato @Jayan per my comment below, env.each { name, value -> println "Name: $name -> Value $value" } prints Name: org.jenkinsci.plugins.workflow.cps.EnvActionImpl@45c2d1ee -> Value null. May 9, 2016 at 20:49
  • 1
    @JamesThomasMoon1979 That's because Pipeline breaks Groovy closures. If you right it old-Java style (that is, new ClassName() { ... }), it should work. Or you run it on a method tagged @NonCPS, then closures will work inside that too. Jul 31, 2016 at 8:51

19 Answers 19

139

According to Jenkins documentation for declarative pipeline:

sh 'printenv'

For Jenkins scripted pipeline:

echo sh(script: 'env|sort', returnStdout: true)

The above also sorts your env vars for convenience.

3
  • 4
    printenv is just a shell command that prints the environment, nothing specific to Jenkins. Without arguments it is equivalent to env without arguments. I'm pretty sure sh 'printenv | sort' will work in DCL or scripted pipeline. May 21, 2018 at 13:23
  • 1
    Tested and sh 'printenv | sort' does in fact work for a Jenkins declarative pipeline; fwiw sh 'env | sort' also works (Both tested on Jenkins ver. 2.46.1). I originally mentioned sh 'printenv' because it was referenced in official Jenkins documentation.
    – Wimateeka
    May 21, 2018 at 14:35
  • 1
    If you lose the returnStdout:true then you don't need the echo; It's just printing what the shell script printed already.
    – Ed Randall
    Nov 15, 2018 at 14:41
91

Another, more concise way:

node {
    echo sh(returnStdout: true, script: 'env')
    // ...
}

cf. https://jenkins.io/doc/pipeline/steps/workflow-durable-task-step/#code-sh-code-shell-script

3
  • 25
    Replace sh with bat and env with set under Windows.
    – jmkgreen
    Apr 11, 2017 at 15:02
  • 1
    For the "sh" case I use 'env | sort' because it drives me crazy that the it isn't ordered by key. Jul 15, 2018 at 0:42
  • under windows: echo bat(returnStdout: true, script: 'set') Feb 4 at 14:34
38

The following works:

@NonCPS
def printParams() {
  env.getEnvironment().each { name, value -> println "Name: $name -> Value $value" }
}
printParams()

Note that it will most probably fail on first execution and require you approve various groovy methods to run in jenkins sandbox. This is done in "manage jenkins/in-process script approval"

The list I got included:

  • BUILD_DISPLAY_NAME
  • BUILD_ID
  • BUILD_NUMBER
  • BUILD_TAG
  • BUILD_URL
  • CLASSPATH
  • HUDSON_HOME
  • HUDSON_SERVER_COOKIE
  • HUDSON_URL
  • JENKINS_HOME
  • JENKINS_SERVER_COOKIE
  • JENKINS_URL
  • JOB_BASE_NAME
  • JOB_NAME
  • JOB_URL
6
  • 1
    This doesn't work: java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: each on a CPS-transformed closure is not yet supported
    – bsky
    Feb 9, 2017 at 15:11
  • 5
    Did you make sure to include the @NonCPS?
    – Joe C.
    Mar 10, 2017 at 20:28
  • 1
    This is the best answer because it will work outside of a node block. Thanks so much for this.
    – Gi0rgi0s
    Sep 6, 2019 at 15:17
  • 2
    Not a good solution, env.getEnvironment() is not whitelisted to be used in pipeline scripts: org.jenkinsci.plugins.scriptsecurity.sandbox.RejectedAccessException: Scripts not permitted to use method org.jenkinsci.plugins.workflow.support.actions.EnvironmentAction getEnvironment.
    – haridsv
    Jul 9, 2021 at 6:38
  • 1
    As written in the answer: Note that it will most probably fail on first execution and require you approve various groovy methods to run in jenkins sandbox. This is done in "manage jenkins/in-process script approval" Jul 11, 2021 at 5:35
15

You can accomplish the result using sh/bat step and readFile:

node {
    sh 'env > env.txt'
    readFile('env.txt').split("\r?\n").each {
        println it
    }
}

Unfortunately env.getEnvironment() returns very limited map of environment variables.

6
  • 2
    sh 'env > env.txt' works well and includes environment variables created by the shell process. env.getEnvironment() shows only the Jenkins set environment variables which are a subset of that seen in sh 'env' technique. Also, it needs script security approval method org.jenkinsci.plugins.workflow.support.actions.EnvironmentAction getEnvironment. The env.each { name, value -> println "Name: $name -> Value $value" } recommended by @Renato @Jayan only prints Name: org.jenkinsci.plugins.workflow.cps.EnvActionImpl@45c2d1ee -> Value null. May 9, 2016 at 21:49
  • Nice!!! Being able to print all env vars helped me discover that Jenkins 2 sets a JOB_BASE_NAME var contains the job name sans the folder it lives in.
    – Bill Agee
    Jun 12, 2016 at 6:36
  • a version that works on windows would be awesome as well :)
    – Bas Hamer
    Jun 29, 2016 at 19:54
  • @Bas Hamer for a windows version try to replace "sh" by "bat"
    – Sebastien
    Jul 20, 2016 at 15:52
  • 2
    Gives me an error java.lang.UnsupportedOperationException: Calling public static java.lang.Object org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.DefaultGroovyMethods.each(java.lang.Object,groovy.lang.Closure) on a CPS-transformed closure is not yet supported (JENKINS-26481); encapsulate in a @NonCPS method, or use Java-style loops Dec 21, 2016 at 18:56
15

Why all this complicatedness?

sh 'env'

does what you need (under *nix)

1
  • 2
    This requires a node block to execute. For my use-case I need to process what environment the node will have then spin a node up based on certain criteria. Sep 23, 2019 at 17:15
13

Cross-platform way of listing all environment variables:

if (isUnix()) {
    sh env
}
else {
    bat set
}
11

Here's a quick script you can add as a pipeline job to list all environment variables:

node {
    echo(env.getEnvironment().collect({environmentVariable ->  "${environmentVariable.key} = ${environmentVariable.value}"}).join("\n"))
    echo(System.getenv().collect({environmentVariable ->  "${environmentVariable.key} = ${environmentVariable.value}"}).join("\n"))
}

This will list both system and Jenkins variables.

8

I use Blue Ocean plugin and did not like each environment entry getting its own block. I want one block with all the lines.

Prints poorly:

sh 'echo `env`'

Prints poorly:

sh 'env > env.txt'
for (String i : readFile('env.txt').split("\r?\n")) {
    println i
}

Prints well:

sh 'env > env.txt'
sh 'cat env.txt'

Prints well: (as mentioned by @mjfroehlich)

echo sh(script: 'env', returnStdout: true)
8

The pure Groovy solutions that read the global env variable don't print all environment variables (e. g. they are missing variables from the environment block, from withEnv context and most of the machine-specific variables from the OS). Using shell steps it is possible to get a more complete set, but that requires a node context, which is not always wanted.

Here is a solution that uses the getContext step to retrieve and print the complete set of environment variables, including pipeline parameters, for the current context.

Caveat: Doesn't work in Groovy sandbox. You can use it from a trusted shared library though.

def envAll = getContext( hudson.EnvVars )
echo envAll.collect{ k, v -> "$k = $v" }.join('\n')
5

Show all variable in Windows system and Unix system is different, you can define a function to call it every time.

def showSystemVariables(){    
   if(isUnix()){
     sh 'env'
   } else {
     bat 'set'
   }
}

I will call this function first to show all variables in all pipline script

stage('1. Show all variables'){
     steps {
         script{            
              showSystemVariables()
         }
     }
} 
4

The easiest and quickest way is to use following url to print all environment variables

http://localhost:8080/env-vars.html/

3

The answers above, are now antiquated due to new pipeline syntax. Below prints out the environment variables.

script {
        sh 'env > env.txt'
        String[] envs = readFile('env.txt').split("\r?\n")

        for(String vars: envs){
            println(vars)
        }
    }
2
  • 1
    1. You need to have it in a script block. 2. They are depreciating the 'groovy style' loop.
    – Eddie
    Mar 29, 2017 at 21:28
  • The for with a closure will also cause problems without a @NonCPS annotation.
    – drewish
    May 9, 2017 at 21:35
2

if you really want to loop over the env list just do:

def envs = sh(returnStdout: true, script: 'env').split('\n')
envs.each { name  ->
    println "Name: $name"
}
2

I found this is the most easiest way:

pipeline {
    agent {
        node {
            label 'master'
        }
    }   
    stages {
        stage('hello world') {
            steps {
                sh 'env'
            }
        }
    }
}
2

You can get all variables from your jenkins instance. Just visit:

  • ${jenkins_host}/env-vars.html
  • ${jenkins_host}/pipeline-syntax/globals
1

ref: https://www.jenkins.io/doc/pipeline/tour/environment/

node {
    sh 'printenv'
}
1

Includes both system and build environment vars:

sh script: "printenv", label: 'print environment variables'
0

another way to get exactly the output mentioned in the question:

envtext= "printenv".execute().text
envtext.split('\n').each
{   envvar=it.split("=")
    println envvar[0]+" is "+envvar[1]
}

This can easily be extended to build a map with a subset of env vars matching a criteria:

envdict=[:]
envtext= "printenv".execute().text
envtext.split('\n').each
{   envvar=it.split("=")
    if (envvar[0].startsWith("GERRIT_"))
        envdict.put(envvar[0],envvar[1])
}    
envdict.each{println it.key+" is "+it.value}
0

I suppose that you needed that in form of a script, but if someone else just want to have a look through the Jenkins GUI, that list can be found by selecting the "Environment Variables" section in contextual left menu of every build Select project => Select build => Environment Variables

enter image description here

2
  • 2
    This is not always available.
    – shuckc
    Jan 15, 2019 at 13:58
  • 2
    I don't think it's available for Jenkinsfiles at all. Screenshot looks like a freestyle build. Jan 24, 2020 at 14:54

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