213

I'm having problems executing a function.

Here's what I did:

  1. Create a function using SQL Server Management Studio. It was successfully created.
  2. I then tried executing the newly created function and here's what I get:

The EXECUTE permission was denied on the object 'xxxxxxx', database 'zzzzzzz', schema 'dbo'.

2
  • If having db_owner role, the user can execute also (not equals to grant exec...)
    – hazjack
    Nov 8 '17 at 4:54
  • I got this error when there was a syntax error in my SQL Statement. Essentially i had merged GO and Create into GOCreate. Other syntax errors also seem to give this error. Jan 22 '18 at 9:03

15 Answers 15

179

Sounds like you need to grant the execute permission to the user (or a group that they a part of) for the stored procedure in question.

For example, you could grant access thus:

USE zzzzzzz;
GRANT EXEC ON dbo.xxxxxxx TO PUBLIC
8
  • 2
    Hi, I know it was a bit time ago, but I have a question. Might such action have some security problems? Does it opens sp to be used for everyone? Aug 4 '14 at 10:39
  • 12
    Yes, it does allow anyone with a connection to the DB to run the stored procedure. I would expect people worried about security to grant access to the relevant group in their database. Aug 4 '14 at 11:13
  • 8
    You can also use GRANT EXEC TO PUBLIC to grant access to all the objects in the database
    – sohaiby
    Dec 20 '15 at 12:45
  • 4
    I would never grant execute permissions to the public role. Any way in our environment it was mandated that public role be disabled. I always grant execute permissions to a specific user or a role created explicitly for this purpose. Nov 27 '17 at 17:04
  • 7
    why is everyone upvoting comments suggesting giving PUBLIC rights to execute anything at all in a database? That's a special case not the defacto.
    – Sat Thiru
    Dec 8 '18 at 2:35
128

Best solution that i found is create a new database role i.e.

CREATE ROLE db_executor;

and then grant that role exec permission.

GRANT EXECUTE TO db_executor;

Now when you go to the properties of the user and go to User Mapping and select the database where you have added new role,now new role will be visible in the Database role membership for: section

For more detail read full article

3
  • 8
    This answer is best if you need to grant EXECUTE for all SPs to a particular user login -- without using public or db_owner. Seems like the most prudent and useful answer here.
    – jcollum
    Oct 26 '15 at 21:10
  • 1
    For some reason this is the only answer that works for me on SQL Server 2012. Giving my user explicit EXECUTE permission does not work. It only works if it inherits the permission through a role.
    – Keith
    Jan 22 '16 at 14:45
  • Then add it to the account such as EXEC sp_addrolemember @rolename = N'db_executor', @membername = N'processAPI'
    – ΩmegaMan
    Mar 26 '20 at 21:39
86

In SQL Server Management Studio, go to security->schema->dbo:

enter image description here

Double-click dbo, select the Permissions page, then click the "View database permissions" link in blue:

enter image description here

Select the user for whom you want to change permissions, and look for the "Execute" permission under the "explicit" tab:

enter image description here

Choose the appropriate permission by checking the appropriate box.

0
56

you need to run something like this

GRANT Execute ON [dbo].fnc_whatEver TO [domain\user]
1
  • 4
    This was what I needed, but I had to do [domain\user] rather than 'domain\user' May 17 '17 at 10:20
50

This will work if you are trying to Grant permission to Users or roles.

Using Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio:

  1. Go to: Databases
  2. Right click on dbo.my_database
  3. Choose: Properties
  4. On the left side panel, click on: Permissions
  5. Select the User or Role and in the Name Panel
  6. Find Execute in in permissions and checkmark: Grant,With Grant, or Deny
2
  • Unfortunately, the user has execute permissions already! Which is why this is so confusing.... Nov 7 '18 at 23:42
  • Thanks Keim this is working perfectly when i checkmark Grant
    – Rosh
    Nov 14 '19 at 8:13
17

Giving such permission can be dangerous, especially if your web application uses that same username.

Now the web user (and the whole world wide web) also has the permission to create and drop objects within your database. Think SQL Injection!

I recommend granting Execute privileges only to the specific user on the given object as follows:

grant execute on storedProcedureNameNoquotes to myusernameNoquotes

Now the user myusernameNoquotes can execute procedure storedProcedureNameNoquotes without other unnecessary permissions to your valuable data.

8

You don't have the right to execute it, although you have enough permissions to create it.

For more information, see GRANT Object Permissions (Transact-SQL)

3

If you have issues like the question ask above regarding the exception thrown when the solution is executed, the problem is permission, not properly granted to the users of that group to access the database/stored procedure. All you need do is to do something like what i have below, replacing mine with your database name, stored procedures (function)and the type of permission or role or who you are granting the access to.

USE [StableEmployee]
GO
GRANT EXEC ON dbo.GetAllEmployees TO PUBLIC

/****** Object: StoredProcedure [dbo].[GetAllEmployees] Script Date: 01/27/2016 16:27:27 ******/

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
ALTER procedure [dbo].[GetAllEmployees]
as
Begin
Select EmployeeId, Name, Gender, City, DepartmentId
From tblEmployee

End
2

You can give everybody execute permission:

GRANT Execute on [dbo].your_object to [public]

"Public" is the default database role that all users are a member of.

1

If you make this user especial for a specific database, then maybe you do not set it as db_owner in "user mapping" of properties

0

I have faced the same problem and I solved as give db_owner permission too to the Database user.

2
  • 13
    i don't think this is a good solution... because i can't give my web application this permission .. i don't know who up vote this May 14 '14 at 13:31
  • 9
    Not recommended, as this is very insecure. You should create appropriate roles instead of using db_owner which has full control over the entire database
    – Yetiish
    May 19 '15 at 13:10
0

here is how to give permission for one user not public,

Direct Query:

Use MyDatabase Grant execute on [dbo].[My-procedures-name] to [IIS APPPOOL\my-iis-pool] Go

0

The general answer is to grant execute permission as explained above. But that doesn't work if the schema owner of SP is different to underlying objects.

Check schema owners by:

select name, USER_NAME(s.principal_id) AS Schema_Owner from sys.schemas s

To change the owner of an schema you can:

ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON SCHEMA::YOUR_SCHEMA TO YOUR_USER;

Examples:

ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON SCHEMA::Claim TO dbo
ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON SCHEMA::datix TO user1;

Finally if within your SP you are truncating a table or changing structure you may want to add WITH EXECUTE AS OWNER in your SP:

ALTER procedure [myProcedure] 
WITH EXECUTE AS OWNER

as

truncate table etl.temp
0

If you only need to grant a single function then (only db admin can do it):

  1. Open Management studio
  2. Find function/procedure you want to grant in Object Eplorer (dbname-Programmability-[Functions/Stored Procedures]-...)
  3. Right click on function or procedure name and open Properties
  4. In Properties select Permissions, add user (or schema) you want and Grant him Execute permission.

I believe this is most secure way how to do it because you only grant to user execution of this function. Nothing else!

-1

you'd better off modifying server roles, which was designed for security privileges. add sysadmin server role to your user. for better security you may have your custom server roles. but this approach will give you what you want for now.

  1. Object Explorer -> Server -> Security -> Logins
  2. Right click on your desired user
  3. Go to Server Roles on left hand side
  4. Make sure sysadmin is checked
  5. Hit OK and restart your SQL server

Good luck

enter image description here

1
  • 5
    sysadmin is total overkill (and dangerous)
    – Trubs
    Mar 10 '20 at 1:31

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