9

Consider this code:

struct A{ 
  volatile int x;
  A() : x(12){
  }
};

A foo(){
  A ret;
  //Do stuff
  return ret;
}

int main()
{
  A a;
  a.x = 13;
  a = foo();
}

Using g++ -std=c++14 -pedantic -O3 I get this assembly:

foo():
        movl    $12, %eax
        ret
main:
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        ret

According to my estimation the variable x should be written to at least three times (possibly four), yet it not even written once (the function foo isn't even called!)

Even worse when you add the inline keyword to foo this is the result:

main:
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        ret

I thought that volatile means that every single read or write must happen even if the compiler can not see the point of the read/write.

What is going on here?

Update:

Putting the declaration of A a; outside main like this:

A a;
int main()
{  
  a.x = 13;
  a = foo();
}

Generates this code:

foo():
        movl    $12, %eax
        ret
main:
        movl    $13, a(%rip)
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        movl    $12, a(%rip)
        ret
        movl    $12, a(%rip)
        ret
a:
        .zero   4

Which is closer to what you would expect....I am even more confused then ever

7
  • Have you tried making more things volatile, e.g. your declarations of A a and A ret, your constructor A::A and your function foo() ? – Isaac May 7 '16 at 1:58
  • @Isaac I shouldn't need to (do I?) – DarthRubik May 7 '16 at 2:00
  • 1
    I'm not certain, I was just suggesting to try different volatile modifications and use the one that works for you. I believe the issue may have something to do with the compiler optimizing away 'instances of A' which it may be allowed to do, if you declare all instances of A that you care about as volatile it may fix the problem. – Isaac May 7 '16 at 2:04
  • Fwiw, clang does what you expect. volatile is weird. vOv – Baum mit Augen May 7 '16 at 2:05
  • @Isaac I am actually not trying to accomplish anything....I was just experimenting and ran into this like a brick wall...and want to know why the brick wall is there in the first place – DarthRubik May 7 '16 at 2:14
2

Visual C++ 2015 does not optimize away the assignments:

A a;
mov         dword ptr [rsp+8],0Ch  <-- write 1
a.x = 13;
mov         dword ptr [a],0Dh      <-- write2
a = foo();
mov         dword ptr [a],0Ch      <-- write3
mov         eax,dword ptr [rsp+8]  
mov         dword ptr [rsp+8],eax  
mov         eax,dword ptr [rsp+8]  
mov         dword ptr [rsp+8],eax  
}
xor         eax,eax  
ret  

The same happens both with /O2 (Maximize speed) and /Ox (Full optimization).

The volatile writes are kept also by gcc 3.4.4 using both -O2 and -O3

_main:
pushl   %ebp
movl    $16, %eax
movl    %esp, %ebp
subl    $8, %esp
andl    $-16, %esp
call    __alloca
call    ___main
movl    $12, -4(%ebp)  <-- write1
xorl    %eax, %eax
movl    $13, -4(%ebp)  <-- write2
movl    $12, -8(%ebp)  <-- write3
leave
ret

Using both of these compilers, if I remove the volatile keyword, main() becomes essentially empty.

I'd say you have a case where the compiler over-agressively (and incorrectly IMHO) decides that since 'a' is not used, operations on it arent' necessary and overlooks the volatile member. Making 'a' itself volatile could get you what you want, but as I don't have a compiler that reproduces this, I can't say for sure.

Last (while this is admittedly Microsoft specific), https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/12a04hfd.aspx says:

If a struct member is marked as volatile, then volatile is propagated to the whole structure.

Which also points towards the behavior you are seeing being a compiler problem.

Last, if you make 'a' a global variable, it is somewhat understandable that the compiler is less eager to deem it unused and drop it. Global variables are extern by default, so it is not possible to say that a global 'a' is unused just by looking at the main function. Some other compilation unit (.cpp file) might be using it.

2
  • If you want to know how to get this to fail like I did I am using godbolt – DarthRubik May 7 '16 at 13:38
  • gcc seems to optimize away the code beginning from version 4.7.3. Both clang (as noted by Baum mit augen) and icc keep the writes. Interestingly gcc removes the writes already with -O1. I added a note on why a global variable A may be less eagerly optimized away. – Sami Sallinen May 7 '16 at 16:39
0

GCC's page on Volatile access gives some insight into how it works:

The standard encourages compilers to refrain from optimizations concerning accesses to volatile objects, but leaves it implementation defined as to what constitutes a volatile access. The minimum requirement is that at a sequence point all previous accesses to volatile objects have stabilized and no subsequent accesses have occurred. Thus an implementation is free to reorder and combine volatile accesses that occur between sequence points, but cannot do so for accesses across a sequence point. The use of volatile does not allow you to violate the restriction on updating objects multiple times between two sequence points.

In C standardese:

§5.1.2.3

2 Accessing a volatile object, modifying an object, modifying a file, or calling a function that does any of those operations are all side effects, 11) which are changes in the state of the execution environment. Evaluation of an expression may produce side effects. At certain specified points in the execution sequence called sequence points, all side effects of previous evaluations shall be complete and no side effects of subsequent evaluations shall have taken place. (A summary of the sequence points is given in annex C.)

3 In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced (including any caused by calling a function or accessing a volatile object).

[...]

5 The least requirements on a conforming implementation are:

  • At sequence points, volatile objects are stable in the sense that previous accesses are complete and subsequent accesses have not yet occurred. [...]

I chose the C standard because the language is simpler but the rules are essentially the same in C++. See the "as-if" rule.

Now on my machine, -O1 doesn't optimize away the call to foo(), so let's use -fdump-tree-optimized to see the difference:

-O1

*[definition to foo() omitted]*

;; Function int main() (main, funcdef_no=4, decl_uid=2131, cgraph_uid=4, symbol_order=4) (executed once)

int main() ()
{
  struct A a;

  <bb 2>:
  a.x ={v} 12;
  a.x ={v} 13;
  a = foo ();
  a ={v} {CLOBBER};
  return 0;
} 

And -O3:

*[definition to foo() omitted]*

;; Function int main() (main, funcdef_no=4, decl_uid=2131, cgraph_uid=4, symbol_order=4) (executed once)

int main() ()
{
  struct A ret;
  struct A a;

  <bb 2>:
  a.x ={v} 12;
  a.x ={v} 13;
  ret.x ={v} 12;
  ret ={v} {CLOBBER};
  a ={v} {CLOBBER};
  return 0;
}

gdb reveals in both cases that a is ultimately optimized out, but we're worried about foo(). The dumps show us that GCC reordered the accesses so that foo() is not even necessary and subsequently all of the code in main() is optimized out. Is this really true? Let's see the assembly output for -O1:

foo():
        mov     eax, 12
        ret
main:
        call    foo()
        mov     eax, 0
        ret

This essentially confirms what I said above. Everything is optimized out: the only difference is whether or not the call to foo() is as well.

1
  • In other words, because the authors of the Standard left things a little loose to allow for the possibility that some implementations might need to be able to implement unusual semantics for "volatile", the authors of GCC feel that they should be under no obligation to behave in a fashion consistent with how the vast majority of microcomputer and microcontroller compilers behave. – supercat May 12 '16 at 21:54

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