25

Is there any easy way to print the copyleft symbol?

enter image description here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyleft

For example as simple as:
© ©

It might be:
&anticopy; &anticopy;

7
  • The copyleft symbol is not part of unicode, and hence you may find you'll have to use an image/custom font for this.
    – jbutler483
    May 7, 2016 at 12:02
  • yeah, now I'm using a little png as background image. Looking for something simpler
    – Evhz
    May 7, 2016 at 12:03
  • This was probably downvoted for the same parochial reasons unicode refused to encode an anarchy symbol, because it was a "logo for an organization" and a "symbol of hate" (!) despite them coming out with an "anti-piracy symbol" and a series of emojis, a dozen different variations of christian symbols adapted from Windows (one symbol per religion for everyone else), 2 versions of the "om symbol", allowing Mac to encode the Apple logo, and waiting until the mid-2000s to encode African scripts. Institutional bias.
    – Ber
    Jul 3, 2016 at 7:24
  • 1
    I had to encode the copyleft symbol and for the sake of backwards continuity, I had to use the "backwards c with combining circle" method described on the Wikipedia copyleft page. You need to use css specified font control (custom horizontal and vertical offsets for a specific font size!) to get it to work.
    – Ber
    Jul 3, 2016 at 7:26
  • 2
    It's now proposed in Unicode 11.0 draft which will be released on June 5, 2018. Apr 14, 2018 at 16:57

10 Answers 10

37

What about some CSS ?

.copyleft {
  display:inline-block;
  transform: rotate(180deg);
}
<span class="copyleft">&copy;</span>

2
  • 1
    @jbutler483 The copyleft interpretation might be lost but the irony is that copyleft (a license requirement) is dependent on copyright (the ability to have a license). So, reading copyleft as copyright isn't totally wrong. May 7, 2016 at 21:52
  • 7
    rotateY(180deg) is better way. Top padding and bottom padding of the &copy; symbol in many fonts are not equal.
    – 18C
    Sep 5, 2017 at 17:32
24

It was just added as part of Unicode 11.0.

Code point: U+1F12F 🄯 COPYLEFT SYMBOL

html entity: &#127279; or &#x1f12f;

3
  • 4
    It would be nice if the relevant authorities could add a convention like &copy;, for instance &copyleft; as it would help to make code more readable and also be easier to remember. Do you know who is in charge of that and if there's any way to suggest such a change to the relevant people?
    – cazort
    Mar 16, 2021 at 14:33
  • 1
    Unrelated to my first comment, do you know where to look up the support for this symbol? It displays fine in my browser but I'm curious how cross-platform this is, if it's dependent on fonts, etc. Like how safe is this to use on the web as a whole?
    – cazort
    Mar 16, 2021 at 14:35
  • @cazort In case you're still curious, the answer is not very. Jan 8, 2022 at 14:26
9

As smnbbrv said in his answer, it is unavailable. However, with some styling you can achieve the desired result:

span {
  font: 18px Arial, sans-serif;
  display: inline-block;
  transform: rotate(180deg);
}
<span>&copy;</span>

You have an html tag in your post, so I assume it's for webbased ends. This might be something you can use.

0
7

Simpler,

CSS:

.copyleft {
  display: inline-block;
  transform: rotate(180deg);
}

.copyleft::after {
  content: "\00a9";
}

HTML:

<span class="copyleft"/>

Notes:

2
  • Works great, but only after I changed className to class in the HTML code. Is className there for a special reason?
    – rlafuente
    Feb 5, 2018 at 18:29
  • 1
    @rlafuente oops, yeah, it comes from React framework code, where the class is interchanged by className. Thank you for spotting it! Corrected. Feb 6, 2018 at 13:05
6

According to the article,

The copyleft symbol is a backwards C in a circle (copyright symbol © mirrored). It has no legal significance.[49]

Because it is unavailable on Unicode, it can be approximated with character U+2184 ↄ LATIN SMALL LETTER REVERSED C or the more widely available character U+0254 ɔ LATIN SMALL LETTER OPEN O between parenthesis '(ɔ)' or, if supported by the application, by combining it with the character U+20DD ↄ⃝ COMBINING ENCLOSING CIRCLE: 'ↄ⃝'.[50] A discussion on the Unicode mailing list in July 2012, contended that there are other ways to insert the copyleft symbol, so it need not be encoded.[51]

You need to read the articles you give till the end.

What you can always do is using CSS with 3d transformations, use for your letter:

transform: rotateY(180deg);

but of course be aware of vendor prefixes / browsers which do not support it

5

if your are familiar with font awesome you can use:

<i class="fa fa-copyright fa-flip-horizontal"></i>
4

These answers are good, but I found that the copyleft symbol would be very low relative to other characters of text on a given line, due to the nature of the rotation. To fix this, I added relative positioning so that I could slide my copyleft symbol up in order to be in-line with all of the text.

.copyleft {
    position: relative;
    top: -5px;
    display:inline-block;
    transform: rotate(180deg);
}

Tweak top as needed.

3
  • 1
    in my case top: +2px; depends clearly on the font used
    – Evhz
    Jun 28, 2017 at 15:43
  • 1
    Yes, thanks for clarifying. In retrospect I didn't say why you might need to tweak the top. ;D Nov 1, 2018 at 19:02
  • ;) they included this in &#127279;
    – Evhz
    Nov 1, 2018 at 19:15
4

This solution is a little more expressive than the other options provided. By doing it this way, we have much cleaner HTML code.

copyleft:before {                                                                                                                  
  content: "©";                                                                                                                    
}                                                                                                                                  

copyleft {                                                                      
  font-weight:100;                                                                                                                     
  opacity:0.7;                                                                                                                   
  vertical-align:middle;                                                                                                           
  display:inline-block;                                                         
  transform: rotate(180deg);                                                    
}    

The final result in the HTML would be:

<copyleft />
2
  • 1
    Very nice solution. +1 to the custom copyleft tag.
    – Evhz
    Aug 20, 2020 at 7:38
  • Using vertical-align made this the best solution for me. Apr 19, 2022 at 8:24
2

Here is the code I use which just flip horizontally the © symbol.

/* Copyleft
-------------------------------------------------- */
.copyleft {
  display: inline-block;
  -moz-transform: scale(-1, 1);
  -webkit-transform: scale(-1, 1);
  -o-transform: scale(-1, 1);
  -ms-transform: scale(-1, 1);
  transform: scale(-1, 1);
}

<span class="copyleft">&copy;</span>
1
  • This does work but it's important to consider that screenreaders will still see this as a copyright symbol if that concerns you
    – Matt
    Nov 15, 2018 at 13:44
1

As not every font is encoding the Unicode copyleft character, a trick using previous answers:

    normal text <style>.copyleft {
      display: inline-block;
      transform: rotateY(180deg);
    }
    .copyleft::after {
      content: "\00a9";
    }
    </style>

    <span class="copyleft"></span>normal text again

Strangely, on Thunderbird, after <span class="copyleft"/> normal text is mirrored but <span class="copyleft"></span> works smoothly. Inline CSS is not the best but for Thunderbird it does the trick and you can just insert <span class="copyleft"></span> for following occurrences.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.