I'm implementing a simple smart pointer, which basically keeps track of the number of references to a pointer that it handles.

I know I could implement move semantics, but I don't think it makes sense as copying a smart pointer is very cheap. Especially considering that it introduces opportunities to produce nasty bugs.

Here's my C++11 code (I omitted some inessential code). General comments are welcome as well.

#ifndef SMART_PTR_H_
#define SMART_PTR_H_

#include <cstdint>

template<typename T>
class SmartPtr {
private:
    struct Ptr {
        T* p_;
        uint64_t count_;
        Ptr(T* p) : p_{p}, count_{1} {}
        ~Ptr() { delete p_; }
    };
public:
    SmartPtr(T* p) : ptr_{new Ptr{p}} {}
    ~SmartPtr();

    SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<T>& rhs);
    SmartPtr(SmartPtr<T>&& rhs) =delete;

    SmartPtr<T>& operator=(const SmartPtr<T>& rhs);
    SmartPtr<T>& operator=(SmartPtr<T>&& rhs) =delete;

    T& operator*() { return *ptr_->p_; }
    T* operator->() { return ptr_->p_; }

    uint64_t Count() const { return ptr_->count_; }

    const T* Raw() const { return ptr_->p_; }
private:
    Ptr* ptr_;
};

template<typename T>
SmartPtr<T>::~SmartPtr() {
    if (!--ptr_->count_) {
        delete ptr_;
    }
    ptr_ = nullptr;
}

template<typename T>
SmartPtr<T>::SmartPtr(const SmartPtr<T>& rhs) : ptr_{rhs.ptr_} {
    ++ptr_->count_;
}

template<typename T>
SmartPtr<T>& SmartPtr<T>::operator=(const SmartPtr<T>& rhs) {
    if (this != &rhs) {
        if (!--ptr_->count_) {
            delete ptr_;
        }
        ptr_ = rhs.ptr_;
        ++ptr_->count_;
    }
    return *this;
}

#endif // SMART_PTR_H_
  • 3
    No. If you want everything to be a copy, then don't declare the move members; don't define them as deleted. stackoverflow.com/questions/26489837/… – T.C. May 7 '16 at 19:39
  • You are exactly right about the operator*! Yikes! Corrected. – blazs May 7 '16 at 19:40
  • 3
    std::shared_ptr has custom move operations because the underlying reference counting mechanism is concurrency-safe. The custom move operations can therefore avoid the atomic increment. – dyp May 7 '16 at 22:26
  • Well, if you want to know some good way, then lock std::shared_ptr code. – Phil1970 Feb 3 '17 at 1:18
up vote 47 down vote accepted

Guideline

Never delete the special move members.

In typical code (such as in your question), there are two motivations to delete the move members. One of those motivations produces incorrect code (as in your example), and for the other motivation the deletion of the move members is redundant (does no harm nor good).

  1. If you have a copyable class and you don't want move members, simply don't declare them (which includes not deleting them). Deleted members are still declared. Deleted members participate in overload resolution. Members not present don't. When you create a class with a valid copy constructor and a deleted move member, you can't return it by value from a function because overload resolution will bind to the deleted move member.

  2. Sometimes people want to say: this class is neither movable nor copyable. It is correct to delete both the copy and the move members. However just deleting the copy members is sufficient (as long as the move members are not declared). Declared (even deleted) copy members inhibit the compiler from declaring move members. So in this case the deleted move members are simply redundant.

If you declare deleted move members, even if you happen to pick the case where it is redundant and not incorrect, every time someone reads your code, they need to re-discover if your case is redundant or incorrect. Make it easier on readers of your code and never delete the move members.

The incorrect case:

struct CopyableButNotMovble
{
    // ...
    CopyableButNotMovble(const CopyableButNotMovble&);
    CopyableButNotMovble& operator=(const CopyableButNotMovble&);
    CopyableButNotMovble(CopyableButNotMovble&&) = delete;
    CopyableButNotMovble& operator=(CopyableButNotMovble&&) = delete;
    // ...
};

Here is example code you probably expected to work with CopyableButNotMovble but will fail at compile time:

CopyableButNotMovble
get()
{
    CopyableButNotMovble x;
    return x;
}

int
main()
{
    CopyableButNotMovble x = get();
}

test.cpp:22:26: error: call to deleted constructor of 'CopyableButNotMovble'
    CopyableButNotMovble x = get();
                         ^   ~~~~~
test.cpp:7:5: note: 'CopyableButNotMovble' has been explicitly marked deleted here
    CopyableButNotMovble(CopyableButNotMovble&&) = delete;
    ^
1 error generated.

The correct way to do this is:

struct CopyableButNotMovble
{
    // ...
    CopyableButNotMovble(const CopyableButNotMovble&);
    CopyableButNotMovble& operator=(const CopyableButNotMovble&);
    // ...
};

The redundant case:

struct NeitherCopyableNorMovble
{
    // ...
    NeitherCopyableNorMovble(const NeitherCopyableNorMovble&) = delete;
    NeitherCopyableNorMovble& operator=(const NeitherCopyableNorMovble&) = delete;
    NeitherCopyableNorMovble(NeitherCopyableNorMovble&&) = delete;
    NeitherCopyableNorMovble& operator=(NeitherCopyableNorMovble&&) = delete;
    // ...
};

The more readable way to do this is:

struct NeitherCopyableNorMovble
{
    // ...
    NeitherCopyableNorMovble(const NeitherCopyableNorMovble&) = delete;
    NeitherCopyableNorMovble& operator=(const NeitherCopyableNorMovble&) = delete;
    // ...
};

It helps if you make a practice of always grouping all 6 of your special members near the top of your class declaration, in the same order, skipping those you don't want to declare. This practice makes it easier for readers of your code to quickly determine that you have intentionally not declared any particular special member.

For example, here is the pattern I follow:

class X
{
    // data members:

public:
    // special members
    ~X();
    X();
    X(const X&);
    X& operator=(const X&);
    X(X&&);
    X& operator=(X&&);

    // Constructors
    // ...
};
  • I don't see the "produces incorrect code (as in your example)". What is incorrect in the code? Do I overlook that specific explanation here? Are you referring to "=delete does not mean "don't use me, instead use next best one". It rather means, "don't use me when you need me — instead be alone in the wild."" from stackoverflow.com/a/19266022/472245 or something else? – towi Sep 1 '16 at 14:53
  • @towi: I've added an example to clarify. Thanks for pointing this out. – Howard Hinnant Sep 1 '16 at 15:23
  • @HowardHinnant "When you create a class with a valid copy constructor and a deleted move member, you can't return it by value from a function because overload resolution will bind to the deleted move member." I had no idea about this. Thanks! – Patryk Sep 4 '16 at 15:33
  • 1
    @HowardHinnant I just wanted to say Thank You! – Innocent Bystander Sep 3 at 16:07

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