628

How do I make a function wait until all jQuery Ajax requests are done inside another function?

In short, I need to wait for all Ajax requests to be done before I execute the next. But how?

  • How are you calling your original ajax requests? – NakedBrunch Sep 14 '10 at 14:07
  • 2
    What do you mean by "done" ? I understand it as "all requests have finished either successfully or not" (resolved or rejected). But you may mean "all requests have finished successfully" (resolved). see all the variations in api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object – Adrien Be Sep 11 '14 at 8:50

22 Answers 22

857

jQuery now defines a when function for this purpose.

It accepts any number of Deferred objects as arguments, and executes a function when all of them resolve.

That means, if you want to initiate (for example) four ajax requests, then perform an action when they are done, you could do something like this:

$.when(ajax1(), ajax2(), ajax3(), ajax4()).done(function(a1, a2, a3, a4){
    // the code here will be executed when all four ajax requests resolve.
    // a1, a2, a3 and a4 are lists of length 3 containing the response text,
    // status, and jqXHR object for each of the four ajax calls respectively.
});

function ajax1() {
    // NOTE:  This function must return the value 
    //        from calling the $.ajax() method.
    return $.ajax({
        url: "someUrl",
        dataType: "json",
        data:  yourJsonData,            
        ...
    });
}

In my opinion, it makes for a clean and clear syntax, and avoids involving any global variables such as ajaxStart and ajaxStop, which could have unwanted side effects as your page develops.

If you don't know in advance how many ajax arguments you need to wait for (i.e. you want to use a variable number of arguments), it can still be done but is just a little bit trickier. See Pass in an array of Deferreds to $.when() (and maybe jQuery .when troubleshooting with variable number of arguments).

If you need deeper control over the failure modes of the ajax scripts etc., you can save the object returned by .when() - it's a jQuery Promise object encompassing all of the original ajax queries. You can call .then() or .fail() on it to add detailed success/failure handlers.

  • 42
    This should be marked as a correct answer because it's simple, efficient and works great. Also, it should be noted that $.when returns a Promise object which has more useful methods, not only .done. For example, with .then(onSuccess, onFailure) method you could react when both requests succeed or at least one of them fails. – skalee Jun 8 '12 at 8:24
  • 1
    Is it possible to bunch the requests ajax1..4 into an array and pass that? – andig May 5 '13 at 9:43
  • 29
    Be careful with the fail case. Unlike done, fail fires immediately on the first fail and disregards the remaining deferreds. – Ryan Mohr Jul 2 '13 at 0:08
  • 1
    @skalee thanks for highlighting the fact that an onFailure function could be attached. As I pointed out in a comment to the OP's question: he might want to indicate more precisely what he meant by "done". "Ryan Mohr" did also have a very good point regarding the fact that fail behaves differently as done, some further reading to be done about Promises I guess html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/es6/promises – Adrien Be Sep 11 '14 at 8:57
  • 1
    It is great to give people exposure to the when method, and to promises in general, but I think this isn't the best answer. If any of those ajax functions anywhere down the line create another ajax request, and then don't integrate that new promise into the chain correctly... those requests will escape this technique. For example, I can't use this technique without modifying the Shopify library I'm using for ajax add-to-cart behaviour, because it wasn't written in a 'promisy' way, and never returns the xhr objects it creates. Does this make sense? Still a great answer, though! – Ziggy Dec 22 '14 at 22:46
279

If you want to wait until all ajax requests are finished in your document, no matter how many of them exist, just use $.ajaxStop event this way:

  $(document).ajaxStop(function () {
      // 0 === $.active
  });

In this case, there is no need to guess how many requests can be in an application that might finish in the future. In some cases ajax requests can be part of a function's inner logic, which can be quite complicated (e.g. calling other functions), and in that case, you might not wait until said function is done with its entire logic rather than only waiting for the ajax part to complete.

$.ajaxStop here can also be bound to any HTML node that you think might be modified by ajax.

Again the purpose of this handler is to know when there is no active ajax not to clear or reset something.

P.S. If you don't mind using ES6 syntax, then you can use Promise.all for known ajax methods. Example:

Promise.all([ajax1(), ajax2()]).then(() => {
 // all requests finished successfully
}).catch(() => {
 // all requests finished but one or more failed
})

An interesting point here is that it works both with Promises and $.ajax requests. Here is jsFiddle demonstrating the last one.

  • 14
    +1 Much better than other answers in case you have to deal with 3rd party scripts with anonymous callbacks/closures. – kaiser Sep 30 '13 at 13:50
  • 5
    @kaiser Valid point but it's not what the question was asking. It's not very good if you don't want to wait for all AJAX calls to return. The question is specific about waiting for the AJAX calls you've made on your own (called inside another function, as the OP wrote). Some other code may have made another AJAX call that you don't want to wait for. – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '13 at 23:24
  • 6
    Compared to the when() solution, it has the advantage to work even if the number of ajax calls is not known. – Alexis Dufrenoy Jun 19 '14 at 13:06
  • 5
    Compared to the when() solution, it has the large disadvantage not to work well together with other components, since it shares a document-wide global state. If there is some long polling going on continuously, it might even never fire. – Bergi Jul 27 '14 at 12:20
  • 3
    You're not correct @AdrienBe, ajaxStop handles all ajax requests no matter do they succeed or not, just as proof of my words look at this jsfiddle.net/36votxba/2 – Arsen Khachaturyan Sep 16 '14 at 8:40
31

I found a good answer by gnarf my self which is exactly what I was looking for :)

jQuery ajaxQueue

//This handles the queues    
(function($) {

  var ajaxQueue = $({});

  $.ajaxQueue = function(ajaxOpts) {

    var oldComplete = ajaxOpts.complete;

    ajaxQueue.queue(function(next) {

      ajaxOpts.complete = function() {
        if (oldComplete) oldComplete.apply(this, arguments);

        next();
      };

      $.ajax(ajaxOpts);
    });
  };

})(jQuery);

Then you can add a ajax request to the queue like this:

$.ajaxQueue({
        url: 'page.php',
        data: {id: 1},
        type: 'POST',
        success: function(data) {
            $('#status').html(data);
        }
    });
  • 37
    It looks like you've forgotten to give proper attribution to this answer, I've added it. – Tim Post Feb 9 '11 at 15:15
20

Use the ajaxStop event.

For example, let's say you have a loading ... message while fetching 100 ajax requests and you want to hide that message once loaded.

From the jQuery doc:

$("#loading").ajaxStop(function() {
  $(this).hide();
});

Do note that it will wait for all ajax requests being done on that page.

  • 2
    I think, this is by far, the best solution... cheers – Val Jul 2 '13 at 10:40
  • 5
    This assumes that you know there won't be any other AJAX requests on the page, not a very good assumption – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '13 at 23:27
  • As of jQuery 1.8, the .ajaxStop() method should only be attached to document. – Geomorillo Apr 20 '14 at 4:33
  • 1
    Correct me if I'm wrong but won't this turn your project into an "old school web forms" site? I mean if you your entire page has to wait for a request before it can continue then what's the point of the ajax request in the first place? – BillRuhl Jan 22 '15 at 21:39
  • @BillRuhl in our case, I'm looping through a jquery collection to build new stuff and need to know about the whole collection when it's done, before making some layout adjustments. Doesn't seem like a particularly unusual case. Would be bad if a bunch of other ajax stuff might be in process, but it won't be, here. – eon Jun 13 at 18:24
20

NOTE: The above answers use functionality that didn't exist at the time that this answer was written. I recommend using jQuery.when() instead of these approaches, but I'm leaving the answer for historical purposes.

-

You could probably get by with a simple counting semaphore, although how you implement it would be dependent on your code. A simple example would be something like...

var semaphore  = 0,     // counting semaphore for ajax requests
    all_queued = false; // bool indicator to account for instances where the first request might finish before the second even starts

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test1.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test2.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test3.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test4.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

// now that all ajax requests are queued up, switch the bool to indicate it
all_queued = true;

If you wanted this to operate like {async: false} but you didn't want to lock the browser, you could accomplish the same thing with a jQuery queue.

var $queue = $("<div/>");
$queue.queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test1.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
}).queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test2.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
}).queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test3.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
}).queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test4.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
});
  • 10
    This seems like it would overly complicate a trivial problem. – Chris Sep 14 '10 at 14:29
  • 2
    It's really not all that complicated. Counting semaphores are a common mechanism in CS. If you prefer though, the example using jQuery queues would work as well without having to implement the semaphore yourself. – BBonifield Sep 14 '10 at 15:00
  • 1
    I do not see a problem with the semaphore counter, however, I do see a problem with the idea of having FOUR functions to handle the resulting callback. You should define a function first, then reference that function in each .get(). That way at least you do not duplicate that code. Not only that but declaring a function(){} each time allocates memory each time! Rather bad practice if you could call a statically defined function. – Alexis Wilke Jan 12 '15 at 4:30
  • 1
    @AlexisWilke This is a 4.5 year old answer, and it was meant to be an example of how semaphores and queues work. You're thinking a little too hard about this, and I don't think CAPITALIZATION TO MAKE A POINT is necessary. – BBonifield Jan 22 '15 at 18:00
  • 1
    Well... I'm not the one who gave you a -1... and I understand that answers do tend to age. Yet, people keep finding them and as far as I know it is not forbidden to give info to people who will potentially make use of them still today. – Alexis Wilke Jan 23 '15 at 9:32
7

javascript is event-based, so you should never wait, rather set hooks/callbacks

You can probably just use the success/complete methods of jquery.ajax

Or you could use .ajaxComplete :

$('.log').ajaxComplete(function(e, xhr, settings) {
  if (settings.url == 'ajax/test.html') {
    $(this).text('Triggered ajaxComplete handler.');
    //and you can do whatever other processing here, including calling another function...
  }
});

though youy should post a pseudocode of how your(s) ajax request(s) is(are) called to be more precise...

7

A little workaround is something like this:

// Define how many Ajax calls must be done
var ajaxCalls = 3;
var counter = 0;
var ajaxCallComplete = function() {
    counter++;
    if( counter >= ajaxCalls ) {
            // When all ajax calls has been done
        // Do something like hide waiting images, or any else function call
        $('*').css('cursor', 'auto');
    }
};

var loadPersons = function() {
        // Show waiting image, or something else
    $('*').css('cursor', 'wait');

    var url = global.ctx + '/loadPersons';
    $.getJSON(url, function(data) {
            // Fun things
    })
    .complete(function() { **ajaxCallComplete();** });
};

var loadCountries = function() {
    // Do things
    var url = global.ctx + '/loadCountries';
    $.getJSON(url, function(data) {
            // Travels
    })
    .complete(function() { **ajaxCallComplete();** });
};

var loadCities = function() {
    // Do things
    var url = global.ctx + '/loadCities';
    $.getJSON(url, function(data) {
            // Travels
    })
    .complete(function() { **ajaxCallComplete();** });
};

$(document).ready(function(){
    loadPersons();
    loadCountries();
    loadCities();
});

Hope can be useful...

  • While the other answers are technically better since it's way easier to understand, I really like this one. Nice! – Jay Nov 28 '14 at 19:07
  • Best workaround – garanda Mar 3 '17 at 14:35
2

jQuery allows you to specify if you want the ajax request to be asynchronous or not. You can simply make the ajax requests synchronous and then the rest of the code won't execute until they return.

For example:

jQuery.ajax({ 
    async: false,
    //code
});
  • 42
    One thing to note is that using { async: false } can temporarily lock the browser. api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax – BBonifield Sep 14 '10 at 14:53
  • 29
    This runs contrary to standard jQuery/Javascript practice. AJAX is always supposed to be asynchronous. You should use jQuery.when() instead. – SystemParadox Apr 24 '12 at 14:50
  • 42
    It's terribly bad idea! Never ever do that! Blocking = not responding to user actions at all, even to scrolling or anything! (Also, async: false is going to be deprecated in jQuery 1.8.) – skalee Jun 8 '12 at 7:48
  • 25
    This is a horribly bad idea. DO NOT USE THIS ANSWER. – Tauren Dec 27 '12 at 23:27
  • 18
    HOW DOES THIS HAVE 21 UPVOTE... Sorry, 20 UPVOTES??? – trgraglia Jul 10 '13 at 14:48
2

As other answers mentioned you can use ajaxStop() to wait until all ajax request are completed.

$(document).ajaxStop(function() {
     // This function will be triggered every time any ajax request is requested and completed
});

If you want do it for an specific ajax() request the best you can do is use complete() method inside the certain ajax request:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "someUrl",
    success: function(data) {
        // This function will be triggered when ajax returns a 200 status code (success)
    },
    complete: function() {
        // This function will be triggered always, when ajax request is completed, even it fails/returns other status code
    },
    error: function() {
        // This will be triggered when ajax request fail.
    }
});


But, If you need to wait only for a few and certain ajax request to be done? Use the wonderful javascript promises to wait until the these ajax you want to wait are done. I made a shortly, easy and readable example to show you how does promises works with ajax.
Please take a look to the next example. I used setTimeout to clarify the example.

// Note:
// resolve() is used to mark the promise as resolved
// reject() is used to mark the promise as rejected

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("button").on("click", function() {

        var ajax1 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            $.ajax({
                type: "GET",
                url: "https://miro.medium.com/max/1200/0*UEtwA2ask7vQYW06.png",
                xhrFields: { responseType: 'blob'},
                success: function(data) {
                    setTimeout(function() {
                        $('#image1').attr("src", window.URL.createObjectURL(data));
                        resolve(" Promise ajax1 resolved");
                    }, 1000);
                },
                error: function() {
                    reject(" Promise ajax1 rejected");
                },
            });
        });

        var ajax2 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            $.ajax({
                type: "GET",
                url: "https://cdn1.iconfinder.com/data/icons/social-media-vol-1-1/24/_github-512.png",
                xhrFields: { responseType: 'blob' },
                success: function(data) {
                    setTimeout(function() {
                         $('#image2').attr("src", window.URL.createObjectURL(data));
                         resolve(" Promise ajax2 resolved");
                    }, 1500);
                },
                error: function() {
                    reject(" Promise ajax2 rejected");
                },
            });
        });

        var ajax3 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            $.ajax({
                type: "GET",
                url: "https://miro.medium.com/max/632/1*LUfpOf7teWvPdIPTBmYciA.png",
                xhrFields: { responseType: 'blob' },
                success: function(data) {
                    setTimeout(function() {
                         $('#image3').attr("src", window.URL.createObjectURL(data));
                         resolve(" Promise ajax3 resolved");
                    }, 2000);
                },
                error: function() {
                    reject(" Promise ajax3 rejected");
                },
            });
        });
        
        Promise.all([ajax1, ajax2, ajax3]).then(values => {
            console.log("We waited until ajax ended: " + values);
            console.log("My few ajax ended, lets do some things!!")
        }, reason => {
            console.log("Promises failed: " + reason);
        });
        
        // Or if you want wait for them individually do it like this
        // ajax1.then(values => {
        //    console.log("Promise 1 resolved: " + values)
        // }, reason => {
        //     console.log("Promise 1 failed: " + reason)
        // });
    });

});
img {
  max-width: 200px;
  max-height: 100px;
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<button>Make AJAX request</button>
<div id="newContent">
    <img id="image1" src="">
    <img id="image2" src="">
    <img id="image3" src="">
</div>

  • $.ajax already returns a Promise. – Ben Fortune Aug 7 at 18:02
1

If you need something simple; once and done callback

        //multiple ajax calls above
        var callback = function () {
            if ($.active !== 0) {
                setTimeout(callback, '500');
                return;
            }
            //whatever you need to do here
            //...
        };
        callback();
  • 3
    it can generate an endless loop ! – Diego Favero Feb 28 '15 at 19:45
  • 1
    This is an endless loop? When? When the AJAX never returns? – Jonathan May 12 '16 at 0:35
1

Also you could use async.js.

I think its better than $.when because you can merge all kinds of asynchronous call that does not support promises out of the box like timeouts, SqlLite calls etc. and not just ajax requests.

1

On the basis of @BBonifield answer, I wrote a utility function so that semaphore logic is not spread in all the ajax calls.

untilAjax is the utility function which invokes a callback function when all the ajaxCalls are completed.

ajaxObjs is a array of ajax setting objects [http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/].

fn is callback function

function untilAjax(ajaxObjs, fn) {
  if (!ajaxObjs || !fn) {
    return;
  }
  var ajaxCount = ajaxObjs.length,
    succ = null;

  for (var i = 0; i < ajaxObjs.length; i++) { //append logic to invoke callback function once all the ajax calls are completed, in success handler.
    succ = ajaxObjs[i]['success'];
    ajaxObjs[i]['success'] = function(data) { //modified success handler
      if (succ) {
        succ(data);
      }
      ajaxCount--;
      if (ajaxCount == 0) {
        fn(); //modify statement suitably if you want 'this' keyword to refer to another object
      }
    };
    $.ajax(ajaxObjs[i]); //make ajax call
    succ = null;
  };

Example: doSomething function uses untilAjax.

function doSomething() {
  // variable declarations
  untilAjax([{
    url: 'url2',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function(data) {
      //do something with success data
    }
  }, {
    url: 'url1',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function(data) {
      //do something with success data
    }
  }, {
    url: 'url2',
    dataType: 'json',
    success: function(response) {
      //do something with success data
    }
  }], function() {
    // logic after all the calls are completed.
  });
}
1

I highly recommend using $.when() if you're starting from scratch.

Even though this question has over million answers, I still didn't find anything useful for my case. Let's say you have to deal with an existing codebase, already making some ajax calls and don't want to introduce the complexity of promises and/or redo the whole thing.

We can easily take advantage of jQuery .data, .on and .trigger functions which have been a part of jQuery since forever.

Codepen

The good stuff about my solution is:

  • it's obvious what the callback exactly depends on

  • the function triggerNowOrOnLoaded doesn't care if the data has been already loaded or we're still waiting for it

  • it's super easy to plug it into an existing code

$(function() {

  // wait for posts to be loaded
  triggerNowOrOnLoaded("posts", function() {
    var $body = $("body");
    var posts = $body.data("posts");

    $body.append("<div>Posts: " + posts.length + "</div>");
  });


  // some ajax requests
  $.getJSON("https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts", function(data) {
    $("body").data("posts", data).trigger("posts");
  });

  // doesn't matter if the `triggerNowOrOnLoaded` is called after or before the actual requests 
  $.getJSON("https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/users", function(data) {
    $("body").data("users", data).trigger("users");
  });


  // wait for both types
  triggerNowOrOnLoaded(["posts", "users"], function() {
    var $body = $("body");
    var posts = $body.data("posts");
    var users = $body.data("users");

    $body.append("<div>Posts: " + posts.length + " and Users: " + users.length + "</div>");
  });

  // works even if everything has already loaded!
  setTimeout(function() {

    // triggers immediately since users have been already loaded
    triggerNowOrOnLoaded("users", function() {
      var $body = $("body");
      var users = $body.data("users");

      $body.append("<div>Delayed Users: " + users.length + "</div>");
    });

  }, 2000); // 2 seconds

});

// helper function
function triggerNowOrOnLoaded(types, callback) {
  types = $.isArray(types) ? types : [types];

  var $body = $("body");

  var waitForTypes = [];
  $.each(types, function(i, type) {

    if (typeof $body.data(type) === 'undefined') {
      waitForTypes.push(type);
    }
  });

  var isDataReady = waitForTypes.length === 0;
  if (isDataReady) {
    callback();
    return;
  }

  // wait for the last type and run this function again for the rest of the types
  var waitFor = waitForTypes.pop();
  $body.on(waitFor, function() {
    // remove event handler - we only want the stuff triggered once
    $body.off(waitFor);

    triggerNowOrOnLoaded(waitForTypes, callback);
  });
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<body>Hi!</body>

1

$.when doesn't work for me, callback(x) instead of return x worked as described here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/13455253/10357604

1

I'm using size check when all ajax load completed

function get_ajax(link, data, callback) {
    $.ajax({
        url: link,
        type: "GET",
        data: data,
        dataType: "json",
        success: function (data, status, jqXHR) {
            callback(jqXHR.status, data)
        },
        error: function (jqXHR, status, err) {
            callback(jqXHR.status, jqXHR);
        },
        complete: function (jqXHR, status) {
        }
    })
}

function run_list_ajax(callback){
    var size=0;
    var max= 10;
    for (let index = 0; index < max; index++) {
        var link = 'http://api.jquery.com/ajaxStop/';
        var data={i:index}
        get_ajax(link,data,function(status, data){
            console.log(index)
            if(size>max-2){
                callback('done')
            }
            size++
            
        })
    }
}

run_list_ajax(function(info){
    console.log(info)
})
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

  • thumbs up to your example. – MarwaAhmad Nov 11 '18 at 10:24
1

To expand upon Alex's answer, I have an example with variable arguments and promises. I wanted to load images via ajax and display them on the page after they all loaded.

To do that, I used the following:

let urlCreator = window.URL || window.webkitURL;

// Helper function for making ajax requests
let fetch = function(url) {
    return $.ajax({
        type: "get",
        xhrFields: {
            responseType: "blob"
        },
        url: url,
    });
};

// Map the array of urls to an array of ajax requests
let urls = ["https://placekitten.com/200/250", "https://placekitten.com/300/250"];
let files = urls.map(url => fetch(url));

// Use the spread operator to wait for all requests
$.when(...files).then(function() {
    // If we have multiple urls, then loop through
    if(urls.length > 1) {
        // Create image urls and tags for each result
        Array.from(arguments).forEach(data => {
            let imageUrl = urlCreator.createObjectURL(data[0]);
            let img = `<img src=${imageUrl}>`;
            $("#image_container").append(img);
        });
    }
    else {
        // Create image source and tag for result
        let imageUrl = urlCreator.createObjectURL(arguments[0]);
        let img = `<img src=${imageUrl}>`;
        $("#image_container").append(img);
    }
});

Updated to work for either single or multiple urls: https://jsfiddle.net/euypj5w9/

0

I have met this problem and created a generic plugin jquery_counter to solve it: https://bitbucket.org/stxnext/jquery_counter/

  • The link is down. – A1rPun Dec 13 '13 at 14:30
  • Corrected the link – zefciu Dec 15 '13 at 16:10
0

I found simple way, it using shift()

function waitReq(id)
{
  jQuery.ajax(
  {
    type: 'POST',
    url: ajaxurl,
    data:
    {
      "page": id
    },
    success: function(resp)
    {
      ...........
      // check array length if not "0" continue to use next array value
      if(ids.length)
      {
        waitReq(ids.shift()); // 2
      )
    },
    error: function(resp)
    {
      ....................
      if(ids.length)
      {
        waitReq(ids.shift());
      )
    }
  });
}

var ids = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];    
// shift() = delete first array value (then print)
waitReq(ids.shift()); // print 1
0

My solution is as follows

var request;
...
'services': {
  'GetAddressBookData': function() {
    //This is the primary service that loads all addressbook records 
    request = $.ajax({
      type: "POST",
      url: "Default.aspx/GetAddressBook",
      contentType: "application/json;",
      dataType: "json"
    });
  },

  ...

  'apps': {
    'AddressBook': {
      'data': "",
      'Start': function() {
          ...services.GetAddressBookData();
          request.done(function(response) {
            trace("ajax successful");
            ..apps.AddressBook.data = response['d'];
            ...apps.AddressBook.Filter();
          });
          request.fail(function(xhr, textStatus, errorThrown) {
            trace("ajax failed - " + errorThrown);
          });

Worked quite nicely. I've tried a lot of different ways of doing this, but I found this to be the simplest and most reusable. Hope it helps

0

Look at my solution:

1.Insert this function (and variable) into your javascript file:

var runFunctionQueue_callback;

function runFunctionQueue(f, index, callback) {

  var next_index = index + 1

  if (callback !== undefined) runFunctionQueue_callback = callback;

  if (f[next_index] !== undefined) {
    console.log(index + ' Next function avalaible -> ' + next_index);
    $.ajax({
      type: 'GET',
      url: f[index].file,
      data: (f[index].data),
      complete: function() {
        runFunctionQueue(f, next_index);
      }
    });
  } else {
    console.log(index + ' Last function');
    $.ajax({
      type: 'GET',
      url: f[index].file,
      data: (f[index].data),
      async: false,
      complete: runFunctionQueue_callback
    });
  }
}

2.Buil an array with your requests, like this:

var f = [
           {file: 'file_path', data: {action: 'action', data: 'any_data}},
           {file: 'file_path', data: {action: 'action', data: 'any_data}},
           {file: 'file_path', data: {action: 'action', data: 'any_data}},
           {file: 'file_path', data: {action: 'action', data: 'any_data}}
        ];

3.Create callback function:

function Function_callback() {
  alert('done');
}

4.Call the runFunctionQueue function with parameters:

runFunctionQueue(f, 0, QuestionInsert_callback);
// first parameter: array with requests data
// second parameter: start from first request
// third parameter: the callback function
-1

Solution given by Alex works fine. Same concept but using it a little different way (when number of calls is not known in advance)

http://garbageoverflow.blogspot.com/2014/02/wait-for-n-or-multiple-or-unknown.html

-4

Try this way. make a loop inside java script function to wait until the ajax call finished.

function getLabelById(id)
{
    var label = '';
    var done = false;
    $.ajax({
       cache: false,
       url: "YourMvcActionUrl",
       type: "GET",
       dataType: "json",
       async: false,
       error: function (result) {
         label='undefined';
         done = true;
        },
       success: function (result) {
            label = result.Message;
            done = true;
        }
     });

   //A loop to check done if ajax call is done.
   while (!done)
   {
      setTimeout(function(){ },500); // take a sleep.
   }

    return label;
}
  • 1
    Your setTimeout() does NOT take a sleep. In this case, you just block all tabs until done becomes true. – Alexis Wilke Jan 12 '15 at 4:24
  • 1
    I think that is this topic asking for: "Wait until all jQuery Ajax requests are done". – ChinaHelloWorld Jun 8 '15 at 0:52
  • 1
    Have you tested this code? my expectation is that done will never be true while the while loop is still running. If the while loop is running, the event loop can't continue and therefore will never run the callback to the ajax success. – Kevin B Jun 8 '15 at 21:22

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