68

Consider this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

int xx = 7;

template<class T>
void f1(T arg)
{
    arg += xx;
}

template<class T>
void f2(T arg)
{
    arg = xx;
}

int main()
{
    int j;

    j=100;
    f1(std::ref(j));
    std::cout << j << std::endl;

    j=100;
    f2(std::ref(j));
    std::cout << j << std::endl;
}

When executed, this code outputs

107
100

I would have expected the second value to be 7 rather than 100.

What am I missing?

  • 17
    The reference wrapper is reseatable, so assigning changes what's referenced, not the referred object. – Kerrek SB May 8 '16 at 15:15
57

A small modification to f2 provides the clue:

template<class T>
void f2(T arg)
{
    arg.get() = xx;
}

This now does what you expect.

This has happened because std::ref returns a std::reference_wrapper<> object. The assignment operator of which rebinds the wrapper. (see http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/functional/reference_wrapper/operator%3D)

It does not make an assignment to the wrapped reference.

In the f1 case, all is working as you expected because a std::reference_wrapper<T> provides a conversion operator to T&, which will bind to the implicit right hand side of ints implicit operator+.

  • 1
    Do you need a job ? – Ramy Sep 26 '16 at 1:20
12

reference_wrapper has operator = and a non explicit constructor, see documentation.

So, even if it is surprising, it is the normal behaviour:

f2 rebinds the local reference_wrapper to xx.

10

arg = xx;

Local arg now refers to (read as binds with) xx. (And no more refers to j)

arg += xx;

Implicit operator T& () is applied to match the argument of operator += and hence addition is performed on referred object i.e. j.

So the observed behaviour is correct.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.