573

Something like:

var jsonString = '{ "Id": 1, "Name": "Coke" }';

//should be true
IsJsonString(jsonString);

//should be false
IsJsonString("foo");
IsJsonString("<div>foo</div>")

The solution should not contain try/catch. Some of us turn on "break on all errors" and they don't like the debugger breaking on those invalid JSON strings.

  • 28
    Is there a valid reason to not use try? – Nick T Aug 13 '13 at 6:12
  • 7
    @NickT Because if you turn on "break on all errors" in the debugger, it will. Chrome now has the option of breaking on uncaught errors tho. – Chi Chan Aug 13 '13 at 14:00
  • 6
    Use just 2 lines to check it with try catch. var isValidJSON = true; try { JSON.parse(jsonString) } catch { isValidJSON = false; } – efkan Aug 30 '16 at 18:29
  • 18
    While that works, it's terribly kludgy and bad practice. Try/catch is meant for exceptional behavior and error handling, not general program flow. – Tasgall Jun 26 '17 at 19:31
  • 11
    @Tasgall As a general rule, yes. But what do you do if the try/catch approach is more performant than any validator-based approach? Go with the (sometimes significantly) slower option just because the alternative is "bad practice"? There's nothing functionally wrong with the try/catch method, so there's no reason not to use it. It's important to have new programmers develop good coding standards, but it's equally important to not reinforce blind adherence to conventional guidelines, especially in cases where the guidelines make things more difficult than they need to be. – Abion47 Aug 15 '18 at 17:53

24 Answers 24

177

A comment first. The question was about not using try/catch.
If you do not mind to use it, read the answer below. Here we just check a JSON string using a regexp, and it will work in most cases, not all cases.

Have a look around the line 450 in https://github.com/douglascrockford/JSON-js/blob/master/json2.js

There is a regexp that check for a valid JSON, something like:

if (/^[\],:{}\s]*$/.test(text.replace(/\\["\\\/bfnrtu]/g, '@').
replace(/"[^"\\\n\r]*"|true|false|null|-?\d+(?:\.\d*)?(?:[eE][+\-]?\d+)?/g, ']').
replace(/(?:^|:|,)(?:\s*\[)+/g, ''))) {

  //the json is ok

}else{

  //the json is not ok

}

EDIT: The new version of json2.js makes a more advanced parsing than above, but still based on a regexp replace ( from the comment of @Mrchief )

| improve this answer | |
  • 63
    This is only checking if the code is safe for eval to use. For example the following string '2011-6-27' would pass that test. – SystemicPlural Jul 27 '11 at 16:22
  • 4
    @SystemicPlural, yes but the question was about not using try/catch – Mic Jul 25 '13 at 10:33
  • 8
    You cannot test whether a string is valid JSON with a regex in JavaScript, since JS regexes don't support the necessary extensions (recursive regexes) that let you do so. Your above code fails on "{". – Venge Jun 1 '14 at 22:12
  • 2
    @Mic json2.js no longer uses that simple check (instead uses a 4 stage parsing to determine valid JSON). Would suggest to revise or remove your answer. Note that I don't think there's anythign wrong with "not having a try/catch as the sole mechanism to check for JSON" as an approach. – Mrchief Jun 20 '16 at 18:21
  • 8
    Just because it helps him, doesn't mean it helps the rest of us, who, years later, have the same question. – McKay Aug 11 '16 at 17:36
970

Use a JSON parser like JSON.parse:

function IsJsonString(str) {
    try {
        JSON.parse(str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    Thank you, but I just ran this with the team and they want something that doesn't use try/catch. The question is edited along with a new title. Sorry about that. – Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:26
  • 4
    @trejder: it does that because 1 is not a string, try it with "1" – Purefan Mar 4 '14 at 23:47
  • 34
    @Gumbo My comment is 1,5 year old! :] I don't remember, what I was doing two weeks ago and you asking me to recall that project? :] No, way... :] – trejder Mar 5 '14 at 9:25
  • 9
    The problem with this answer is, if the string does check out, and you parse it, you'll have parsed it twice. Couldn't you instead return false on a bad parse, but return the object on success? – Carcigenicate Feb 29 '16 at 0:05
  • 5
    @Carcigenicate You could do that. However, JSON.parse("false") evaluates to false as well. – Gumbo Mar 1 '16 at 19:54
455

I know i'm 3 years late to this question, but I felt like chiming in.

While Gumbo's solution works great, it doesn't handle a few cases where no exception is raised for JSON.parse({something that isn't JSON})

I also prefer to return the parsed JSON at the same time, so the calling code doesn't have to call JSON.parse(jsonString) a second time.

This seems to work well for my needs:

function tryParseJSON (jsonString){
    try {
        var o = JSON.parse(jsonString);

        // Handle non-exception-throwing cases:
        // Neither JSON.parse(false) or JSON.parse(1234) throw errors, hence the type-checking,
        // but... JSON.parse(null) returns null, and typeof null === "object", 
        // so we must check for that, too. Thankfully, null is falsey, so this suffices:
        if (o && typeof o === "object") {
            return o;
        }
    }
    catch (e) { }

    return false;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Of the answers on the page, this is the most robust and reliable. – Jonline May 30 '14 at 17:07
  • 30
    o && o !== null is superfluous. – Aleksei Matiushkin Oct 21 '14 at 15:21
  • 4
    So is using triple-equals with typeof, which always returns a string. :) – Hein Haraldson Berg Dec 3 '14 at 16:09
  • 6
    Despite being an old post, I thought it worthwhile to put a fiddle up demonstrating your answer @matth, please note that objects won't be valid.. you must pass a JSON string. Might come in handy for anyone starting out I guess. – MindVox May 25 '16 at 14:18
  • 2
    The function should return undefined, not false because false is a valid json string and there is no way to differentiate between tryParseJSON("false") and tryParseJSON("garbage") – sparebytes Feb 22 '18 at 17:32
58
// vanillaJS
function isJSON(str) {
    try {
        return (JSON.parse(str) && !!str);
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
}

Usage: isJSON({}) will be false, isJSON('{}') will be true.

To check if something is an Array or Object (parsed JSON):

// vanillaJS
function isAO(val) {
    return val instanceof Array || val instanceof Object ? true : false;
}

// ES2015
var isAO = (val) => val instanceof Array || val instanceof Object ? true : false;

Usage: isAO({}) will be true, isAO('{}') will be false.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Be careful since null passes this validation. – Farzad YZ May 30 '17 at 7:33
  • 2
    return !!(JSON.parse(str) && str); should block null values. I will update the answer with this code. – Machado Aug 23 '17 at 20:08
  • 1
    This is the best answer, since it also allow you to also check if the JSON has been objectified, and thus not passing the parse() test, causing WTF's. – not2qubit Feb 22 '18 at 13:33
32

Here my working code:

function IsJsonString(str) {
  try {
    var json = JSON.parse(str);
    return (typeof json === 'object');
  } catch (e) {
    return false;
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    IsJsonString(null); //returns true. It can be fixed by comparing typeof str === 'string' – gramcha Nov 26 '19 at 8:54
25

I used a really simple method to check a string how it's a valid JSON or not.

function testJSON(text){
    if (typeof text!=="string"){
        return false;
    }
    try{
        JSON.parse(text);
        return true;
    }
    catch (error){
        return false;
    }
}

Result with a valid JSON string:

var input='["foo","bar",{"foo":"bar"}]';
testJSON(input); // returns true;

Result with a simple string;

var input='This is not a JSON string.';
testJSON(input); // returns false;

Result with an object:

var input={};
testJSON(input); // returns false;

Result with null input:

var input=null;
testJSON(input); // returns false;

The last one returns false because the type of null variables is object.

This works everytime. :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    JSON.parse(null), JSON.parse("false") doesn't throw errors, probably there are more examples – klodoma Mar 15 '18 at 10:18
  • Yeah, you are right, I forgot to check how the input is a string or not, If I do that, this method with null input it gives back false. But the "false" input is a valid JSON string. This will be parsed to boolean (false). Now I modify the code to be more accurate. – kukko Mar 16 '18 at 8:36
16

In prototypeJS, we have method isJSON. You can try that. Even json might help.

"something".isJSON();
// -> false
"\"something\"".isJSON();
// -> true
"{ foo: 42 }".isJSON();
// -> false
"{ \"foo\": 42 }".isJSON();
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    Thanks, but I think using the prototype library to do this is a little overkilled. – Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:29
  • 4
    You gave FOUR examples but only THREE results. What is the result for "{ foo: 42 }".isJSON()? If false, as I assume (result should follow function it document), then good question is, why it is false? { foo: 42 } seems to be perfectly valid JSON. – trejder Sep 29 '12 at 9:58
  • 4
    @trejder Unfortunately, the JSON spec requires quoted keys. – mikermcneil Oct 8 '12 at 1:27
  • 4
    And "2002-12-15".isJSON returns true, while JSON.parse("2002-12-15") throws an error. – ychaouche Nov 13 '12 at 17:14
  • 4
    I think the better answer here would be to pull that function out of the prototype library and place it here. Especially since api.prototypejs.org/language/string/prototype/isjson is 404. – jcollum May 28 '13 at 17:53
5

From Prototype framework String.isJSON definition here

/**
   *  String#isJSON() -> Boolean
   *
   *  Check if the string is valid JSON by the use of regular expressions.
   *  This security method is called internally.
   *
   *  ##### Examples
   *
   *      "something".isJSON();
   *      // -> false
   *      "\"something\"".isJSON();
   *      // -> true
   *      "{ foo: 42 }".isJSON();
   *      // -> false
   *      "{ \"foo\": 42 }".isJSON();
   *      // -> true
  **/
  function isJSON() {
    var str = this;
    if (str.blank()) return false;
    str = str.replace(/\\(?:["\\\/bfnrt]|u[0-9a-fA-F]{4})/g, '@');
    str = str.replace(/"[^"\\\n\r]*"|true|false|null|-?\d+(?:\.\d*)?(?:[eE][+\-]?\d+)?/g, ']');
    str = str.replace(/(?:^|:|,)(?:\s*\[)+/g, '');
    return (/^[\],:{}\s]*$/).test(str);
  }

so this is the version that can be used passing a string object

function isJSON(str) {
    if ( /^\s*$/.test(str) ) return false;
    str = str.replace(/\\(?:["\\\/bfnrt]|u[0-9a-fA-F]{4})/g, '@');
    str = str.replace(/"[^"\\\n\r]*"|true|false|null|-?\d+(?:\.\d*)?(?:[eE][+\-]?\d+)?/g, ']');
    str = str.replace(/(?:^|:|,)(?:\s*\[)+/g, '');
    return (/^[\],:{}\s]*$/).test(str);
  }

function isJSON(str) {
    if ( /^\s*$/.test(str) ) return false;
    str = str.replace(/\\(?:["\\\/bfnrt]|u[0-9a-fA-F]{4})/g, '@');
    str = str.replace(/"[^"\\\n\r]*"|true|false|null|-?\d+(?:\.\d*)?(?:[eE][+\-]?\d+)?/g, ']');
    str = str.replace(/(?:^|:|,)(?:\s*\[)+/g, '');
    return (/^[\],:{}\s]*$/).test(str);
  }

console.log ("this is a json",  isJSON( "{ \"key\" : 1, \"key2@e\" : \"val\"}" ) )

console.log("this is not a json", isJSON( "{ \"key\" : 1, \"key2@e\" : pippo }" ) )

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Anyone have test suite for comparing all these answers? I'd like to see if this one is correct. – Lonnie Best Nov 21 '19 at 18:58
  • 1
    @LonnieBest good point. My 2 cents. I have used for years in production and it has always worked fine and with a reasonable execution time. – loretoparisi Nov 21 '19 at 22:18
4

This answer to reduce the cost of trycatch statement.

I used JQuery to parse JSON strings and I used trycatch statement to handle exceptions, but throwing exceptions for un-parsable strings slowed down my code, so I used simple Regex to check the string if it is a possible JSON string or not without going feather by checking it's syntax, then I used the regular way by parsing the string using JQuery :

if (typeof jsonData == 'string') {
    if (! /^[\[|\{](\s|.*|\w)*[\]|\}]$/.test(jsonData)) {
        return jsonData;
    }
}

try {
    jsonData = $.parseJSON(jsonData);
} catch (e) {

}

I wrapped the previous code in a recursive function to parse nested JSON responses.

| improve this answer | |
  • What does jQuery do that JSON.parse() doesn't do? – ADJenks Apr 18 '19 at 20:26
4

I think I know why you want to avoid that. But maybe try & catch !== try & catch. ;o) This came into my mind:

var json_verify = function(s){ try { JSON.parse(s); return true; } catch (e) { return false; }};

So you may also dirty clip to the JSON object, like:

JSON.verify = function(s){ try { JSON.parse(s); return true; } catch (e) { return false; }};

As this as encapsuled as possible, it may not break on error.

| improve this answer | |
3

Maybe it will useful:

    function parseJson(code)
{
    try {
        return JSON.parse(code);
    } catch (e) {
        return code;
    }
}
function parseJsonJQ(code)
{
    try {
        return $.parseJSON(code);
    } catch (e) {
        return code;
    }
}

var str =  "{\"a\":1,\"b\":2,\"c\":3,\"d\":4,\"e\":5}";
alert(typeof parseJson(str));
alert(typeof parseJsonJQ(str));
var str_b  = "c";
alert(typeof parseJson(str_b));
alert(typeof parseJsonJQ(str_b));

output:

IE7: string,object,string,string

CHROME: object,object,string,string

| improve this answer | |
3

Here is the typescript version too:

JSONTryParse(input: any) {
    try {
        //check if the string exists
        if (input) {
            var o = JSON.parse(input);

            //validate the result too
            if (o && o.constructor === Object) {
                return o;
            }
        }
    }
    catch (e: any) {
    }

    return false;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • Typescript is not javascript, but your answer seems to be. – Lonnie Best Nov 21 '19 at 19:02
1

You can use the javascript eval() function to verify if it's valid.

e.g.

var jsonString = '{ "Id": 1, "Name": "Coke" }';
var json;

try {
  json = eval(jsonString);
} catch (exception) {
  //It's advisable to always catch an exception since eval() is a javascript executor...
  json = null;
}

if (json) {
  //this is json
}

Alternatively, you can use JSON.parse function from json.org:

try {
  json = JSON.parse(jsonString);
} catch (exception) {
  json = null;
}

if (json) {
  //this is json
}

Hope this helps.

WARNING: eval() is dangerous if someone adds malicious JS code, since it will execute it. Make sure the JSON String is trustworthy, i.e. you got it from a trusted source.

Edit For my 1st solution, it's recommended to do this.

 try {
      json = eval("{" + jsonString + "}");
    } catch (exception) {
      //It's advisable to always catch an exception since eval() is a javascript executor...
      json = null;
    }

To guarantee json-ness. If the jsonString isn't pure JSON, the eval will throw an exception.

| improve this answer | |
  • First example using eval says that "<div>foo</div>" is valid JSON. It may work differently in different browsers, but it appears that in FireFox, eval() accepts XML. – Mark Lutton Sep 14 '10 at 15:26
  • Thank you, but I just ran this with the team and they want something that doesn't use try/catch. The question is edited along with a new title. Sorry about that. – Chi Chan Sep 14 '10 at 15:26
  • @Mark Lutton, the object type won't be of JSON but of XML Dom Document (I forgot what the exact type in firefox is). – Buhake Sindi Sep 14 '10 at 15:30
  • 1
    eval also accepts valid JavaScript, like "alert(5);" and strings in single quotes, which are not valid JSON. – Mark Lutton Sep 14 '10 at 15:48
  • 12
    This is pure eval. – Chris Baker Nov 19 '13 at 20:45
1

var jsonstring='[{"ConnectionString":"aaaaaa","Server":"ssssss"}]';

if(((x)=>{try{JSON.parse(x);return true;}catch(e){return false}})(jsonstring)){

document.write("valide json")

}else{
document.write("invalide json")
}

| improve this answer | |
1

I infer from the opening comment that the use case is delineating whether a response is HTML or JSON. In which case, when you do receive JSON, you probably ought to be parsing it and handling invalid JSON at some point in your code anyway. Aside from anything, I imagine you would like to be informed by your browser should JSON be expected but invalid JSON received (as will users by proxy of some meaningful error message)!

Doing a full regex for JSON is unnecessary therefore (as it would be - in my experience - for most use-cases). You would probably be better off using something like the below:

function (someString) {
  // test string is opened with curly brace or machine bracket
  if (someString.trim().search(/^(\[|\{){1}/) > -1) {
    try { // it is, so now let's see if its valid JSON
      var myJson = JSON.parse(someString);
      // yep, we're working with valid JSON
    } catch (e) {
      // nope, we got what we thought was JSON, it isn't; let's handle it.
    }
  } else {
    // nope, we're working with non-json, no need to parse it fully
  }
}

that should save you having to exception handle valid non-JSON code and take care of duff json at the same time.

| improve this answer | |
  • This hybrid solution seems like it would be an efficient way to avoid having to do a try catch in most non-JSON cases. I like that aspect of your approach. – Lonnie Best Nov 21 '19 at 19:14
1
if(resp) {
    try {
        resp = $.parseJSON(resp);
        console.log(resp);
    } catch(e) {
        alert(e);
    }
}

hope this works for you too

| improve this answer | |
0
function get_json(txt)
{  var data

   try     {  data = eval('('+txt+')'); }
   catch(e){  data = false;             }

   return data;
}

If there are errors, return false.

If there are no errors, return json data

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    In the question: "The solution should not contain try/catch". – ddmps Mar 6 '13 at 3:58
  • 1
    Why? This is guaranteed way... Would be foolish to disuse! I'm sorry for not know English. I used Google Translate – Emrah Tuncel Mar 6 '13 at 23:32
  • Interesting. I'd like to see a performance comparison of JSON.parse versus this eval based solution. Yet this look scary from a security/injection perspective. – Lonnie Best Nov 21 '19 at 19:41
0

Oh you can definitely use try catch to check whether its or not a valid JSON

Tested on Firfox Quantom 60.0.1

use function inside a function to get the JSON tested and use that output to validate the string. hears an example.

    function myfunction(text){

       //function for validating json string
        function testJSON(text){
            try{
                if (typeof text!=="string"){
                    return false;
                }else{
                    JSON.parse(text);
                    return true;                            
                }
            }
            catch (error){
                return false;
            }
        }

  //content of your real function   
        if(testJSON(text)){
            console.log("json");
        }else{
            console.log("not json");
        }
    }

//use it as a normal function
        myfunction('{"name":"kasun","age":10}')
| improve this answer | |
0

The function IsJsonString(str), that is using JSON.parse(str), doesn't work in my case.
I tried to validate json output from GraphiQL it always return false. Lucky me, isJSON works better:

var test = false;

$('body').on('DOMSubtreeModified', '.resultWrap', function() {

    if (!test) {   
        var resultWrap = "{" + $('#graphiql .resultWrap').text().split("{").pop();
        if isJSON(resultWrap) {test = !test;}
        console.log(resultWrap); 
        console.log(resultWrap.isJSON());
    }

});

Sample output:

THREE.WebGLRenderer 79
draw.js:170 {xxxxxxxxxx​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {xxxxxxxxxx ​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {xxxxxxxxxx ​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {xxxxxxxxxx ​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,  "tickr": 1.56,​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,  "tickr": 1.56,  "fps": 41.666666666666664,​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,  "tickr": 1.56,  "fps": 41.666666666666664,  "width": 396.984,​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,  "tickr": 1.56,  "fps": 41.666666666666664,  "width": 396.984,  "height": 327​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,  "tickr": 1.56,  "fps": 41.666666666666664,  "width": 396.984,  "height": 327}​
draw.js:170 false
draw.js:170 {  "PI": 3.141592653589793,  "time": 1570751209006,  "tick": 156,  "tickr": 1.56,  "fps": 41.666666666666664,  "width": 396.984,  "height": 327}
draw.js:170 true

| improve this answer | |
0

For people who like the .Net convention of "try" functions that return a boolean and handle a byref param containing the result. If you don't need the out parameter you can omit it and just use the return value.

StringTests.js

  var obj1 = {};
  var bool1 = '{"h":"happy"}'.tryParse(obj1); // false
  var obj2 = {};
  var bool2 = '2114509 GOODLUCKBUDDY 315852'.tryParse(obj2);  // false

  var obj3 = {};
  if('{"house_number":"1","road":"Mauchly","city":"Irvine","county":"Orange County","state":"California","postcode":"92618","country":"United States of America","country_code":"us"}'.tryParse(obj3))
    console.log(obj3);

StringUtils.js

String.prototype.tryParse = function(jsonObject) {
  jsonObject = jsonObject || {};
  try {
    if(!/^[\[{]/.test(this) || !/[}\]]$/.test(this)) // begin / end with [] or {}
      return false; // avoid error handling for strings that obviously aren't json
    var json = JSON.parse(this);
    if(typeof json === 'object'){
      jsonObject.merge(json);
      return true;
    }
  } catch (e) {
    return false;
  }
}

ObjectUtils.js

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, 'merge', {
  value: function(mergeObj){
    for (var propertyName in mergeObj) {
      if (mergeObj.hasOwnProperty(propertyName)) {
        this[propertyName] = mergeObj[propertyName];
      }      
    }
    return this;
  },
  enumerable: false, // this is actually the default
});
| improve this answer | |
0

If you're dealing with a response from an AJAX (or XMLHttpRequest) call, what worked for me is to check the response content type and parse or not the content accordingly.

| improve this answer | |
0
  • isValidJsonString - check for valid json string

  • JSON data types - string, number, object (JSON object), array, boolean, null (https://www.json.org/json-en.html)

  • falsy values in javascript - false, 0, -0, 0n, ", null, undefined, NaN - (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Glossary/Falsy)

  • JSON.parse

    • works well for number , boolean, null and valid json String won't raise any error. please refer example below

      • JSON.parse(2) // 2
      • JSON.parse(null) // null
      • JSON.parse(true) // true
      • JSON.parse('{"name":"jhamman"}') // {name: "jhamman"}
      • JSON.parse('[1,2,3]') // [1, 2, 3]
    • break when you parse undefined , object, array etc

      • it gave Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected end of JSON input . please refer example below
      • JSON.parse({})
      • JSON.parse([])
      • JSON.parse(undefined)
      • JSON.parse("jack")
function isValidJsonString(jsonString){
    
    if(!(jsonString && typeof jsonString === "string")){
        return false;
    }

    try{
       JSON.parse(jsonString);
       return true;
    }catch(error){
        return false;
    }

}

| improve this answer | |
0

I thought I'd add my approach, in the context of a practical example. I use a similar check when dealing with values going in and coming out of Memjs, so even though the value saved may be string, array or object, Memjs expects a string. The function first checks if a key/value pair already exists, if it does then a precheck is done to determine if value needs to be parsed before being returned:

  function checkMem(memStr) {
    let first = memStr.slice(0, 1)
    if (first === '[' || first === '{') return JSON.parse(memStr)
    else return memStr
  }

Otherwise, the callback function is invoked to create the value, then a check is done on the result to see if the value needs to be stringified before going into Memjs, then the result from the callback is returned.

  async function getVal() {
    let result = await o.cb(o.params)
    setMem(result)
    return result

    function setMem(result) {
      if (typeof result !== 'string') {
        let value = JSON.stringify(result)
        setValue(key, value)
      }
      else setValue(key, result)
    }
  }

The complete code is below. Of course this approach assumes that the arrays/objects going in and coming out are properly formatted (i.e. something like "{ key: 'testkey']" would never happen, because all the proper validations are done before the key/value pairs ever reach this function). And also that you are only inputting strings into memjs and not integers or other non object/arrays-types.

async function getMem(o) {
  let resp
  let key = JSON.stringify(o.key)
  let memStr = await getValue(key)
  if (!memStr) resp = await getVal()
  else resp = checkMem(memStr)
  return resp

  function checkMem(memStr) {
    let first = memStr.slice(0, 1)
    if (first === '[' || first === '{') return JSON.parse(memStr)
    else return memStr
  }

  async function getVal() {
    let result = await o.cb(o.params)
    setMem(result)
    return result

    function setMem(result) {
      if (typeof result !== 'string') {
        let value = JSON.stringify(result)
        setValue(key, value)
      }
      else setValue(key, result)
    }
  }
}
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-8

Very Simple one-liner code ( But Hacky approach )

if (expected_json.id === undefined){
   // not a json
}
else{
   // json
}

NOTE: This only works if you are expecting something is JSON string like id. I am using it for an API and expecting the result either in JSON or some error string.

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