4

My immediate question is why don't the query resolve functions get called?

My suspicion is that there is a problem with the return value from the mutation resolve function (which works). So, what should the return values look like?

A higher level question is: is there a standard way in GraphQL to register a new user and handle the case of the user already existing?

The approach below is to have all the data about the user in the session data and pass back only the data the front end needs.

/**
 * graphQL.js
 *
 * Created by jrootham on 18/04/16.
 *
 * Copyright © 2016 Jim Rootham
 */

import graphqlHTTP from "express-graphql";
import {
    graphql,
    GraphQLSchema,
    GraphQLObjectType,
    GraphQLString,
    GraphQLNonNull,
    GraphQLBoolean
} from 'graphql';
import {hash} from "bcrypt"
import {connect, User} from "../database/defineDB";

const GraphUser = new GraphQLObjectType({
    name: "GraphUser",
    description: "A user object",
    fields: () => {
        return {
            name: {
                type: GraphQLString,
                resolve: (_, __, session) => {
                    console.log("resolve name", session);
                    let name = "";
                    if (session.signedOn) {
                        return User.findById(session.userId).then (user => {
                            return user.name;
                        });
                    }

                    console.log("name", name);
                    return name;
                }
            },
            signedOn: {
                type: GraphQLBoolean,
                resolve: (_, __, session) => {
                    return session.signedOn;
                }
            },
            existed: {
                type: GraphQLBoolean,
                resolve: (_, __, session) => {
                    return session.existed;
                }
            }
        }
    }
});

const query = new GraphQLObjectType({
    name: 'Queries',
    fields: () => {
        return {
            graphUser: {
                type: GraphUser
            }
        }
    }
});

const mutation = new GraphQLObjectType({
    name: 'Mutations',
    description: "Modification actions",
    fields() {
        return {
            registerUser: {
                type: GraphUser,
                args: {
                    name: {
                        type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
                    },
                    password: {
                        type: new GraphQLNonNull(GraphQLString)
                    }
                },
                resolve(_, args, session) {
                    console.log("resolve", args);
                    User.findOne({where:{name:args.name}}).then(user => {
                        console.log("After find", user);
                        if (user === null) {
                            const getHash = new Promise(
                                resolve => {
                                    hash(args.password, 10, (err, hash) => {
                                        resolve(hash);
                                    });
                                }
                            );

                            const result = getHash.then(hash => {
                                connect.models.user.create({
                                    name: args.name,
                                    password: hash
                                }).then(user => {
                                    session.userId = user.id;
                                    session.signedOn = true;
                                    session.existed = false;

                                    console.log("session user", session.userId);
                                    return user;
                                });

                                console.log(result);
                                return result;
                            });
                        }
                        else {
                            session.userId = 0;
                            session.signedOn = false;
                            session.existed = true;
                            console.log("existed");
                            return GraphUser;
                        }
                    });
                }
            }
        }
    }
});

const schema = new GraphQLSchema({
    query: query,
    mutation: mutation
});

export const useGraphQL = app => {
    app.use('/graphql', graphqlHTTP(request =>({
        schema: schema,
        context: request.session,
        formatError: error => ({
            message: error.message,
            locations: error.locations,
            stack: error.stack
        }),
        graphiql:true
    })));
};
  • @ OP, you shouldn't change the question to the extent that it changes the context. Mutation code has been changed? – Ahmad Ferdous Jun 13 '16 at 18:24
2

why don't the query resolve functions get called?

Your root query field graphUser doesn't get resolved.

const query = new GraphQLObjectType({
    name: 'Queries',
    fields: () => {
        return {
            graphUser: {
                type: GraphUser
                // TODO Add a resolve function here
            }
        }
    }
});

My suspicion is that there is a problem with the return value from the mutation resolve function (which works). So, what should the return values look like?

If you use Promise, Your mutation's resolve function should return a Promise (it doesn't return now) and should use resolve(result) instead of return result. If user already exists, just return the existing user object instead of type GraphUser.

A higher level question is: is there a standard way in GraphQL to register a new user and handle the case of the user already existing?

GraphQL itself does not have a standard way of handling user registration. You just need a mutation for user registration. In the mutation's resolve function, whether the user already exists is checked. If exists, the mutation can return error. Otherwise, the user is registered and the newly created user object is returned.

  • The root query was just a place holder. Resolving it has no effect. – Jim Rootham Jun 13 '16 at 17:13
  • The Promise part of the answer was a clue, but not complete, see below. – Jim Rootham Jun 13 '16 at 17:14
  • Re: root query, it's not a mere placeholder. Unless you resolve it, you can't make query on it. – Ahmad Ferdous Jun 13 '16 at 18:27
  • Re: promise part, only you can know the complete implementation depending on your business logic. I tried to point you in the right direction. You had 3 questions in total :-) – Ahmad Ferdous Jun 13 '16 at 18:29
1

The created Promise needs to be returned, and each .then function also needs to return its argument. This turned out to be an issue handling Promises not a GraphQL issue.

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