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I am developing a game for android, and I am wondering how multiplayer networking would work. I don't need the specifics (eg... how to send data back and forth). I'm curious, for instance, in my game I have a sun in the background (sprite) that I move programmaticly across the sky. In a multiplayer game, would I calculate that on both machines? Or just 1, then send the sun location to the other? Also, would it be a bunch of if statements in my code to see if the current game if multiplayer, if so do this, if not do this? Or would I have separate classes, 1 for single player, and a different one for multiplayer? Thanks in advance!

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  • Generally speaking, you do not send the actual state of the screen to the other screen. The engine exists on both and therefore all updates and so on are handled there. The only thing you should be sending between devices is coordinates, if they've changed, and variable data like scores, and such... – durbnpoisn May 9 '16 at 15:34
  • @durbnpoisn But, if for instance, the players started playing at different times and joined the same game, wouldn't the position of the sun be different on both devices? As with all the other dynamics I have going on? – Wyatt May 9 '16 at 15:39
  • Perhaps. But why would you need to tell the OTHER player that? It only matters what one player sees on their screen. That's why local views remain local. – durbnpoisn May 9 '16 at 15:53
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This is way to broad to be discussed here. Most games nowadays abstract the server from the clients, the server validates all the input of the clients and calculates the logic. Then sends it to everyone listening on the server and the clients get use the updated information to draw to the screen. The main rule is Never trust the client so you need to question all the input on the server side.

Look into KryoNet if you want to start with networks, you basically create two applications, one can be just a console application that receives messages from connected clients and the client itself. The server does not need to draw anything but having feedback about what is happening is useful.

But anyway, it's better to ask something like this on a forum since networking is a very broad topic. And this most likely does not completely answer your question because of that. So unless you have something a lot more specific to ask create a new question about it.

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I know this may be 'too broad', but it seems like a reasonable search for knowledge so I'll answer each point:

I am developing a game for android, and I am wondering how multiplayer networking would work. I don't need the specifics (eg... how to send data back and forth). I'm curious, for instance, in my game I have a sun in the background (sprite) that I move programmaticly across the sky.

In a multiplayer game, would I calculate that on both machines? Or just 1, then send the sun location to the other?

I assume the Sun is not an important part of the game (like a player, badguy or projectile) so for simplicity I would calculate its position by time of day (a day could be 10 minutes instead of 24 hours), which will work well as long as the user's clock is correct.

Reducing network activity is a good idea.

However player locations, or randomly generated terrain (or better yet just a seed to the random number generator) would have to be transmitted over the network.

Also, would it be a bunch of if statements in my code to see if the current game if multiplayer, if so do this, if not do this? Or would I have separate classes, 1 for single player, and a different one for multiplayer? Thanks in advance!

I found that I should not embrace object oriented programming too aggressively (creating classes for 'everything'), as the Java textbooks (that I studied 10 years ago) originally suggested.

I would consider Minecraft as a possible inspiration, as they have classes for various entities so that they can have different AI, or be player controlled - but when you are in single player, it seems to act as a multiplayer game with only one player. (like a localhost server, but communication is contained within the software and skipping the TCP layer)

That will help keep the same code for both situations.


I think the Sun question could have been a good on-topic question, but the classes vs if statements question is a bit vague. Sometimes Chat helps with those since you are just trying to formulate your thoughts. You are going to have a lot of things to think through and try different ways.

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