-3
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int main()
{

    int i, j, array[10] = { 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 };
    modify();

    for (i = 0; i<10; i++)
    {
        printf("Origional Array is:");
        printf(" %d\n", array[i]);

    }

    modify(array);

    for (i = 0; i<10; i++)
    {
        printf("New Array:");
        printf("%d\n", array[i]);
    }

    system("pause");
}

modify(int array[10])
{
    int j;
    for (j = 0; j<10; j++)
    {
        array[j] = array[j] * 3;
    }
    return array[j];
}

there is no compile time error... but at run time this show signal sigsegv segmentation fault. please help me...!

  • 1
    C++ doesn't allow you to have functions without specifying a return type. Ignoring conio, see here for some errors your compiler should give you. (Edit) As for your problem, a debugger would be a great help. You can figure out where it crashes and go step by step to that point, watching variable values and understanding why the crash occurs. – chris May 9 '16 at 18:47
  • then please help me... can u correct my code..? – mirza salman May 9 '16 at 18:49
  • 1
    This looks like C code. modify has implicit int return value. Was there a compiler warning that you ignored? – jxh May 9 '16 at 18:50
  • 2
    Are you sure your programming in C++? Because if you did then you would get compiler errors. – Some programmer dude May 9 '16 at 18:53
  • 1
    Make sure your IDE is set to all warnings or waning level 4, or that -Wall is on the command line. – Michael Dorgan May 9 '16 at 18:57
1

[Note that this answer assumes that the code is actually C and not C++]

There are a few problems with your code.

The fist is this:

modify();

Here you call the function, before you have told the compiler that it exists. Apparently your compiler says it's okay, which it really isn't. What probably is happening is that the compiler deduces (fancy word for "guessing") that the function takes no arguments and returns nothing. I.e. that the declaration look like

void modify(void);

This "guessing" was allowed in older standards of C, but since the C99 standard this implicit declaration was removed and would give you an error in a compliant compiler.

A little later you do

modify(array);

which once again calls the function, but since the compiler thinks that the function doesn't take any arguments, none will actually be passed. Which leads to the worst problem of all: In the actual modify function you use an argument, but since none is actually passed the variable will not be initialized and you will have undefined behavior trying to dereference that pointer (arrays decays to pointers when passed as arguments to functions) and you will most likely have your crash there.

There also the returning from the function:

return array[j];

Here the value of j will be 10 which is out of bounds for the array you pass (well, try to pass) to the function.

To solve the problem, add the function prototype declaration somewhere before calling the function, a usual place would be in the global scope just before the main function. Something like

...
int modify(int *array);

int main(void)
{
    ...
}
...

And fix the return statement in the function.

  • Joachim Pileborg... thank you soo much...! – mirza salman May 9 '16 at 19:02
  • @Joachim Just out of curiosity: Well, you're very often propose (of course correct) answers for very individual problems. How does that fit with the generally suspected Q&A scheme to be helpful for future research, and what are your particular points to decide to answer, or just close vote (duplicates aside)? – πάντα ῥεῖ May 9 '16 at 19:05
  • 1
    From what I remembered, implicit declarations were of the form int foo();, namely an integer return and any number of parameters. – chris May 9 '16 at 19:22

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