-5

I'm trying to overload Age by using this

Date DOB
getAge()
getAge(Date DOB)   

put i don't know how to overload this method can anyone help me please?

public class Customer
{
    private string CustomerID;
    private string FirstName;
    private string LastName;
    private int Age;
    private string Address;
    private double phoneNumber;

    public Customer(string CustomerID, string FirstName, string LastName, int Age, string Address, double phoneNumber)
    {
        this.CustomerID = CustomerID;
        this.FirstName = FirstName;
        this.LastName = LastName;
        this.Age = Age;
        this.Address = Address;
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }

    public int age {get ; set; }
}
}
4
  • age is not a method here; its a property – sujith karivelil May 9 '16 at 18:56
  • What method are you trying to overload? The way your question is worded is confusing. – RScottCarson May 9 '16 at 18:57
  • I want to overload Age, but I don't know how to use overload method – user5520587 May 9 '16 at 18:57
  • 1
    There is no method in your example. Age is a private field and age is a public property. Also what do you want to overload. What needs to be passed in? As it stands you question is unclear and will likely be closed if you don't clarify. – juharr May 9 '16 at 19:00
0

To overload, you specify a method of the same type and name but with different parameters. for example:

public int Foo(int bar)
{
  return bar*2
}

public int Foo(string bar)
{
  return bar.Length*2;
}

Then when you reference the Foo method, you get 1 overload, the string parameter one.

HOWEVER,

The age part of your type isn't a method, it's a field. A field is different as it can be accessed and edited (dependent on the getters and setters) when you instantiate a type (var foo = new Person()).

6
  • It doesn't have to have the same return type. It's just that you can't only change the return type. – Jon Skeet May 9 '16 at 19:00
  • @JonSkeet Oh I thought it could only be differentiated by the parameter names. Where would you change the return type? I can't think of any time I'd do that... – TechnicalTophat May 9 '16 at 19:03
  • it's will be like this? public int DOB(int Age) { return Age; } public int Age(int Age) { return Age; } – user5520587 May 9 '16 at 19:06
  • @user5520587 please refer to a book for beginners or google the difference between properties and methods. – wajiro_91 May 9 '16 at 19:13
  • @RhysO: Can't remember ever needing it myself, though I could be wrong... – Jon Skeet May 9 '16 at 19:16
0

I'm not really sure what you're asking, but maybe this can help, the example below shows an other overload of the customer class constructor, and a GetAge method passing in the date of birth and returning the age.

    public class Customer
{
    private string CustomerID;
    private string FirstName;
    private string LastName;
    private int Age;
    private string Address;
    private double phoneNumber;

    public Customer(string customerId, string firstName, string lastName, int age, string address, double phoneNumber)
    {
        this.CustomerID = customerId;
        this.FirstName = firstName;
        this.LastName = lastName;
        this.Age = age;
        this.Address = address;
        this.phoneNumber = phoneNumber;
    }

    // overloading the Customer constructor passing in the 'Date of Birth' instead of the age
    public Customer(string customerId, string firstName, string lastName, DateTime dateOfBirth, string address, double phoneNumber)
        : this(customerId, firstName, lastName, GetAge(dateOfBirth), address, phoneNumber) // uses the previous constructor
    { }

    public int age { get; set; }

    // Calculating the age
    private static int GetAge(DateTime dob)
    {
        var age = 0;
        var today = DateTime.Today;

        age = today.Year - dob.Year;
        if (dob.AddYears(age) > today)// still has to celebrate birthday this year
            age--;

        return age;
    }
}

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