-1

I'm trying to figure out how to reduce an integer every second. Everything suggests things that are many, many lines long, and are explaining things in a generic, interchangeable way. So far I've set it up as...

public int timer = 180;

public Text timerCounterText;

// Use this for initialization
void Start () 
{
    timerCounterText.text = "Time Left: " + timer.ToString();
}

Now I have no idea how to actually make the integer decrease by one each second, I don't want any suggestions of a potentially better way to do it unless there's no way to do it from what I have here.

I just want a simple, in as few lines as possible way to reduce my timer integer by 1 each second, as the way I have done this is the only way I understand how to do this so far.

Sorry if this is too much to ask, I just want a script I can understand, not just one that works best, as I'm just a student, not making a product.

9
  • so normally when someone wants to decrement a value they would issue Count = Count - 1 this is basic Math also if you were wanting to update every second you would create an instance of a Timer and in the OnTick event is where you would update your label. use google to look up the C# Timer Class for some amazing examples. – MethodMan May 9 '16 at 19:50
  • 7
    To make things happen at a certain interval you can use a Timer and its Tick event. – TaW May 9 '16 at 19:52
  • I suppose this is a Windows application and timerCounterText is actually a TextBox? – Geeky Guy May 9 '16 at 19:52
  • 1
    Guys, I think it's obvious to the OP how you decrement an integer. What he wants to know is how to do that once per second, which is something entirely different. – Geeky Guy May 9 '16 at 19:53
  • 1
    @DotNetProgrammer your answer is right, however Thread.Sleep is not guaranteed to tick once a second. It means the thread is going to sleep for at least one second, but it may take longer than that for it to execute again. Still, have my upvote. – Geeky Guy May 9 '16 at 21:15
2

I have worked a lot with timers in C# (a HELL of a lot - I used to develop software for a Sports Timing company).

There are a few ways of doing it. Some more accurate than others.

The simplest - which is the way you're looking at would be like so:

Set your total seconds in a private field:

private int _secondsRemaining = 180; // 3 minutes

Create a Timer stored in a private field:

private System.Timers.Timer _countdownTimer;

Create a StartTimer() method. Initialize the _countdownTimer, and create an Event Handler for when the timer ticks - this is what happens when it "reaches 0"/fires/whatever you want to call it:

public void StartTimer()
{
    _countdownTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(1000); // 1000 is the number of milliseconds
                                                     // 1000ms = 1 second

    // Set a handler for when the timer "ticks"
    // The "Tick" event will be fired after 1 second (as we've set it)
    // The timer will loop, though and keep firing until we stop it
    // Or unless it is set to not automatically restart
    _countdownTimer.Tick += OnTimer_Tick;

    // Start the timer!
    _countdownTimer.Start();
}

You will need to call StartTimer() from somewhere in your program, otherwise it won't ever start (obviously) - you can do this from the constructor or a button click etc.

Now, create an Event Handler for when the timer ticks. In this, decrement (take 1 from) the _secondsRemaining value; and then display it in your timerCounterText label:

// This is what gets fired when the timer "reaches 0"
private void OnTimer_Tick(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    _secondsRemaining--; // the same as "_secondsRemaining = secondsRemaining -1"

    timerCounterText.Text = string.Format("Time Remaining: {0} seconds",
                                                  _secondsRemaining);
}

This is a nice and easy way to make a countdown timer.

The drawback is, that the timer doesn't fire EXACTLY every second, so you may notice a little bit of drift.

Like I mentioned; depending on the accuracy you need, there are other ways I have used. It depends on what the timer's being used for.

WAIT! There's more!
What would also be useful (if you need it), is, when the _secondsRemaining reaches 0 to stop the timer.

Create a StopTimer() method:

private void StopTimer()
{
    if (_countdownTimer != null)
    {
        _countdownTimer.Tick -= OnTimer_Tick;
        _countdownTimer.Stop();
        _countdownTimer.Dispose();
        _countdownTimer = null;
    }
}

You could also use this method when you want to stop the timer manually from a button click or whatever.

Notice the null check, and the code within it. The null check is just for damage limitation in case the _countdownTimer hasn't been initialized etc. and to stop your program bombing out if so.

The code within the if check unsubscribes from the Tick event, stops the timer (obviously), and then gets rid of the _countdownTimer - you don't need to; but you will need to unsubscribe & stop it...
If we called StartTimer() again and initialized the timer, we'd be adding another subscription to the Tick event - this would cause the OnTimer_Tick method to be called twice every time the _countdownTimer fires (and so on and so forth).

Now, in your OnTimer_Tick handler, where we decrement the value of _secondsRemaining - check after, if it is less or equal to 0:

private void OnTimer_Tick(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    _secondsRemaining--; // decrement the _secondsRemaining as before

    if (_secondsRemaining <= 0)
    {
        StopTimer(); // This will stop the timer when the _secondsRemaining
                     // reach 0 (or go below - it shouldn't)

        // You can also add in other stuff to happen at 0
        // such as "Ending the game", as you described
    }

    // Display the time remaining, still - as before
    timerCounterText.Text = string.Format("Time Remaining: {0} seconds",
                                                  _secondsRemaining);
}

Where the check for _secondsRemaining <= 0 is, you could also add your own methods for other things to happen - such as Ending your game as you asked in your question :)

I won't go into any more detail; and I'll let you figure it out - but you could even add in ResetTimer() methods, so you could start the timer again.

I hope this helps - any questions or any other ways to do timers you need; just ask.

2
  • 1
    I voted this one up because it mentions the accuracy issue. – Lunyx May 9 '16 at 21:04
  • Thanks - I pointed this out probably out of force of habit, after dealing with sports times accurate to 0.001s :p </brag> – Geoff James May 9 '16 at 21:12
2

I would advise a separate thread doing a decrease in the integer. I would do this with a while loop

public event SecondHappenedEventHandler SecondHappened;
public delegate void SecondHappenedEventHandler(int second);
private int timer = 180; 

Public Void Start()
{
   timer = 180;
   Thread th = New Thread(New ThreadStart(Monitor);
   th.Start();
}
Private Void Monitor()
{
    While (timer != 0)
    {
         timer--;
         SecondHappened(timer);
         Thread.Sleep(1000); //This is milliseconds
    }
}

My C# is a little rusty since I have been doing VB more recently for work. Then Add a raiseevent in that class that passes back the integer to the the other class. So your other class would make an instance of this class and have an event that gets the second passed back and display it to the end user.

public Text timerCounterText;
private TimerClass timer;

// Use this for initialization
void Start () 
{
    timer.Start
}

private void SecondHappened(int timerBack) 
{
   timerCounterText.text = "Time Left: " + timerBack.ToString();
}
2

You can use one of the few Timer classes in .NET in order to get your program do stuff in regular intervals. There's usually one type of timer class that is appropriate for a given situation depending on your app type(i.e. Windows, Console, Service...etc)

Since you are after a simple example, you can have a look at the System.Timers.Timer class:

Generates an event after a set interval, with an option to generate recurring events.

Example of it's usage in a console application (P.S. If you have Windows Forms apps, you probably don't want to use it in this way):

int _countDown = 180;

void Start() 
{
    var timer = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);   // Duration in milliseconds
    timer.Elapsed += async ( sender, e ) => await HandleTimer();
    timer.Start();   
}

void HandleTimer()
{
    _countDown--;
    Console.WriteLine("Time Left: {0}", _countDown);
}
0

If you work in WF (Windows Forms), I suggest using a Timer. Create a timer control, set it's interval to 1000 (milliseconds), and in your start function just enable it:

void Start () 
{
    timer1.Enabled = true;
    timerCounterText.text = "Time Left: " + timer.ToString();
}

Now, a double click on the timer should create a timer_tick event. Use it like that:

void timer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    timerCounterText.text = "Time Left: " + (--timer).ToString();
}

Then it should reduce the timer by 1 every second. Of course you should check when it arrives to 0, and then set timer1.Enabled to false.

0

Using the Decrement Operator --

If you wanted to decrement it prior to the value being updated, you could use the decrement operator --:

void Start () 
{
    // This will decrement the timer by 1
    timer--;
    // Output the value
    timerCounterText.Text = "Time Left: " + timer.ToString();
}

You could also accomplish this same thing inline using prefix notation, which will update the value prior to using it :

void Start () 
{
    // Decrement your count and output it
    timerCounterText.Text = "Time Left: " + (--timer).ToString();
}

Cleaning Up Your Output

You can clean up your output a bit more by using the String.Format() method as well :

void Start () 
{
    // Decrement your count and output it
    timerCounterText.Text = String.Format("Time Left: {0}",--timer);
}

or if you are using C#, you can take advantage of String Interpolation :

void Start () 
{
    // Decrement your count and output it
    timerCounterText.Text = $"Time Left: {--timer}";
}

Making Your Timer Tick

Assuming that you are using a Timer class, you can set it's Tick event to be triggered as a certain interval. This is what you would use to actually decrement your value and output it to the user :

 // Define a timer
 Timer countDown = new Timer();
 // Sets the timer interval to 1 seconds.
 countDown.Interval = 1000;
 // Call the tick event every second
 countDown.Tick += new EventHandler(Tick);
 // Start your timer
 countDown.Start();

and your Tick event would look like this :

 private static void Tick(Object myObject,EventArgs myEventArgs)
 {
     // Check if your timer has run out
     if(countDown <= 0)
     {
          // Timer has run out, handle accordingly
          countDown.Stop();
     }
     else 
     {
          // Otherwise output and decrement
          String.Format("Time Left: {0}",--timer);
     }
 }
7
  • How do I make it decrease according to seconds, though? And where should I include the 'timer--;'? – The Only One May 9 '16 at 19:53
  • --timer.ToString() produces a compilation error, but (--timer).ToString() works. For that matter, you don't even need the .ToString(), "Time Left: " + --timer; works just as well. – p.s.w.g May 9 '16 at 19:54
  • I've added your Start() method to add a bit of context. Both of the proposed methods should do the same thing. – Rion Williams May 9 '16 at 19:55
  • Thanks p.s.w.g. I've added some string-formatting approaches as well to help OP out. – Rion Williams May 9 '16 at 19:58
  • It does seem to be working in one form, but I'm still unsure how to make it happen every second. I essentially want the integer '180' to decrease to '0' by 1 each second, so that I can make my game end at '0' after exactly 3 minutes, and I want the text simply to show the player how much time they have left. Sorry to be such a hassle with this. – The Only One May 9 '16 at 19:58

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