2

I'd like to transpose a time series dataset to feed into some machine learning algorithms. Here's an example of what I'd like to do, except the number of lags is large and I'm looking for a more elegant way to do it:

    set.seed(42)
data <- data.frame(time = 1:5, value = rnorm(5))
data
# time      value
# 1    1  1.3709584
# 2    2 -0.5646982
# 3    3  0.3631284
# 4    4  0.6328626
# 5    5  0.4042683
data %>%
  mutate(lag_1 = lag(value),
         lag_2 = lag(value, 2),
         lag_3 = lag(value, 3),
         lag_4 = lag(value, 4),
         lag_5 = lag(value, 5))
# time      value      lag_1      lag_2      lag_3    lag_4 lag_5
# 1    1  1.3709584         NA         NA         NA       NA    NA
# 2    2 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA         NA       NA    NA
# 3    3  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA       NA    NA
# 4    4  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584       NA    NA
# 5    5  0.4042683  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982 1.370958    NA
4

You can transform using data.table more conveniently since shift from data.table allows the parameter n to be a vector while the lag function in dplyr does not.

library(data.table)
> setDT(data)[, paste("lag", 1:5, sep = "_") := shift(value, 1:5)]
> data
   time      value      lag_1      lag_2      lag_3     lag_4 lag_5
1:    1 -1.4162466         NA         NA         NA        NA    NA
2:    2 -0.2366333 -1.4162466         NA         NA        NA    NA
3:    3  0.5146632 -0.2366333 -1.4162466         NA        NA    NA
4:    4  1.9243923  0.5146632 -0.2366333 -1.4162466        NA    NA
5:    5  1.6161165  1.9243923  0.5146632 -0.2366333 -1.416247    NA

To be more specific about the shift and lag, here is an example of how the lag function does not allow you to do what shift does.

> vec <- 1:10
> shift(vec, 1:2)
[[1]]
 [1] NA  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9

[[2]]
 [1] NA NA  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8

> lag(vec, 1:2)
Error in lag(vec, 1:2) : n must be a single positive integer
In addition: Warning message:
In if (n == 0) return(x) :
  the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used
1

bind_cols may be more convenient than mutate, as it's easy to generate a data.frame of lags, either with a vectorized version of dplyr::lag or data.table::shift:

data %>% bind_cols(setNames(data.frame(Vectorize(lag, 'n')(.$value, 1:5)), 
                            paste0('lag_', 1:5)))
# Source: local data frame [5 x 7]
# 
#    time      value      lag_1      lag_2      lag_3    lag_4 lag_5
#   (int)      (dbl)      (dbl)      (dbl)      (dbl)    (dbl) (dbl)
# 1     1  1.3709584         NA         NA         NA       NA    NA
# 2     2 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA         NA       NA    NA
# 3     3  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA       NA    NA
# 4     4  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584       NA    NA
# 5     5  0.4042683  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982 1.370958    NA

data %>% bind_cols(data.frame(shift(.$value, 1:5, give.names = TRUE)))
# Source: local data frame [5 x 7]
# 
#    time      value   V1_lag_1   V1_lag_2   V1_lag_3 V1_lag_4 V1_lag_5
#   (int)      (dbl)      (dbl)      (dbl)      (dbl)    (dbl)    (dbl)
# 1     1  1.3709584         NA         NA         NA       NA       NA
# 2     2 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA         NA       NA       NA
# 3     3  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA       NA       NA
# 4     4  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584       NA       NA
# 5     5  0.4042683  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982 1.370958       NA

Alternately, you can use plain old data.frame instead:

data.frame(data, shift(data$value, 1:5, give.names = TRUE))
  • I think this is closest in spirit (without using reference semantics) to what I was looking for... Is there a way to generalize to a "grouped mutate" where the lag depends on the grouping? – kevinykuo May 10 '16 at 13:48
  • That sounds like another question, and is not very clear without an example. If I understand you correctly, you can lag groups, but lag can't really calculate anything in its second parameter (even 2-1 fails). shift is a little better, but still can't handle n(), which would be useful, but you could likely make the whole thing work in pure data.table. – alistaire May 10 '16 at 15:44
0

This can be done with base R by using lapply. We loop through the k using lapply and assign the output to new columns in 'data'.

data[paste("lag", 1:5, sep="_")] <- lapply(1:5, function(i) lag(data$value, i))
data
#  time      value      lag_1      lag_2      lag_3    lag_4 lag_5
#1    1  1.3709584         NA         NA         NA       NA    NA
#2    2 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA         NA       NA    NA
#3    3  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA       NA    NA
#4    4  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584       NA    NA
#5    5  0.4042683  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982 1.370958    NA
0

I had the same issue. This is how I did it:

set.seed(42)

data <- data.frame(time = 1:5, value = rnorm(5))

lags<-5

lags.tmp <-funs_(sapply(1:lags, function(x) paste0("lag(.,",x,")")))
names(lags.tmp)<-sapply(1:lags, function(x) paste0("lag_",x))

data %>%
  mutate_at(vars(value),.funs=lags.tmp)
#  time      value      lag_1      lag_2      lag_3    lag_4 lag_5
#1    1  1.3709584         NA         NA         NA       NA    NA
#2    2 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA         NA       NA    NA
#3    3  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584         NA       NA    NA
#4    4  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982  1.3709584       NA    NA
#5    5  0.4042683  0.6328626  0.3631284 -0.5646982 1.370958    NA

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