8

I'm working on the implementation of strdup() in C, I'm new to C and I'm trying to build my own library. I'm using the actual strdup() from string.h to test mine and I run into a bus error when I test my source against a main program but none when I use the actual strdup(). Also I can't use any existing functions excluding malloc().

Source code:

#include <stdlib.h>

char *ft_strdup(char *src)
{

    char *str;
    int len;

    while (src[len])
        len++;
    str = (char*)malloc(sizeof(*str) * (len+1));
    while (*src)
        *str++ = *src++;
    *str = '\0';
    return (str);
}

Why do I keep getting a bus error?

7
  • 6
    You miss to initialize len with 0
    – Ctx
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 8:04
  • 1
    I'm new to C and I'm trying to build my own library -- Generally not a good idea. I had been using C for many years before I started my own standard library, and I'm still at it many years later. The <string.h> functions are quite easy, generally speaking, but you will rapidly run into problems (or implement the functions too naively, leaving you with a frustratingly broken project). Try something on the user side of the standard lib for your first steps.
    – DevSolar
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 8:21
  • @user3121023 Thanks, How do i return the pointer back to the beginning?
    – adot
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 8:33
  • @user3121023 Nevermind, Thanks for everything ive cracked it.
    – adot
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 8:35
  • strdup() is not part of the standard library, so there are situations (like porting code that depends on it to other systems), where you need to implement it yourself.
    – Enno
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 9:39

2 Answers 2

19

Try following fix:

  1. Initialize len before increment it.
  2. Don't cast malloc's return value, and don't use sizeof(char), it's defined to be 1 in the standard, per cstd 6.5.3.4p4:

    When sizeof is applied to an operand that has type char, unsigned char, or signed char, (or a qualified version thereof) the result is 1.

  3. Use a pointer to save the original str pointer

#include <stdlib.h>

char *ft_strdup(char *src)
{
    char *str;
    char *p;
    int len = 0;

    while (src[len])
        len++;
    str = malloc(len + 1);
    p = str;
    while (*src)
        *p++ = *src++;
    *p = '\0';
    return str;
}
5
  • Can you please explain point 2? With regards to the casting of malloc and use of sizeof?
    – adot
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 8:43
  • @afullstopdot Sure, I've updated the post for the reason of point 2.
    – fluter
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 8:50
  • I literally started using stackoverflow an hour ago, I didnt know i could do that. @machine_1. I will now.
    – adot
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 9:10
  • 1
    Note that *p++ = *src++ is equivalent to *(p++) = *(src++) because the postfix operator ++ has higher precedence than the dereference operator *.
    – hexicle
    Commented May 24, 2018 at 0:52
  • fluter that wasthe answer that I was looking for. Thanks.
    – Jonadabe
    Commented Sep 28, 2022 at 8:25
7

If you must implement your own strdup function, at least rely on the rest of string.h for as much as you can. Many of these functions are optimized, and faster than you can write them yourself. For example, strlen is probably using SSE instructions, while your manual search for the null-terminator byte is not. It's also less code, which is always better. In short, I would suggest this:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char *ft_strdup(const char *s1)
{
  char *str;
  size_t size = strlen(s1) + 1;

  str = malloc(size);
  if (str) {
    memcpy(str, s1, size);
  }
  return str;
}
5
  • 2
    You forgot to null-terminate the string. str[len] = '\0'. Please edit your post and correct this.
    – Lundin
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 14:29
  • char *ft_strdup(const char *str) { return strcpy(malloc(strlen(src)+1), str); } ;-) Commented May 10, 2016 at 15:46
  • But of course the op's function, yours and mine have all a wrong semantic, in that the real strdup() returns NULL on allocation error, not a segmentation fault! Commented May 10, 2016 at 15:49
  • 1
    @Lundin: Actually, I should have just copied the null-terminator in the memcpy. A simple + 1 does the trick.
    – Enno
    Commented May 10, 2016 at 18:50
  • 1
    Enno thank you so much for your clean explanation!
    – Jonadabe
    Commented Sep 28, 2022 at 8:17

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