class Overflow {}
class Stack extends Overflow {
  constructor() {
    super();
  }
}

let stack = new Stack();

https://plnkr.co/edit/JqRfuDAav9opvapwCGpT?p=preview

If I use construtor() I must call super() always.

Why isn't super() auto called in constructor?

Edit: Is super() here calling the base constructor AND setting the prototype? Seems wrong. Edit: Why is super() required? Even when I've no intention of calling the base constructor.

  • "Why isn't super() auto called in constructor?" Which arguments should be passed to it? None, all or a subset? Any decision would probably lead to a discussion why that approach was chosen and not another... – Felix Kling May 10 '16 at 18:13
  • The call to super() is required always. Try to write a valid ES6 constructor without super(). – old May 10 '16 at 18:24
  • I know... I don't understand what you are trying to tell me with your comment. – Felix Kling May 10 '16 at 18:25
  • "Why is super() required? Even when I've no intention of calling the base constructor." Because this needs to be initialized properly (i.e. the object generated by calling the constructor needs to be constructed properly). That is primarily a concern for extending exotic objects / classes, such as Array. – Felix Kling May 10 '16 at 18:26
  • Related: esdiscuss.org/topic/… – Felix Kling May 10 '16 at 18:32

Why isn't super() auto called in constructor?

So you can decide where in the constructor to call it. This is perfectly valid, for instance:

constructor(foo) {
    let bar;
    if (foo) {
        bar = /*...*/;
    } else {
        bar = /*...*/;
    }
    super(bar);
}

...provided no code prior to the call to super uses this (or super.xyz).

Yes, it would have been possible to define the language such that if you didn't have any call to super in your constructor at all, it was added automatically for you at the beginning (a'la Java), but they just decided not to do it that way.

Is super() here calling the base constructor AND setting the prototype? Seems wrong.

No, it's calling the base constructor. The prototype was set before your constructor was called. It's exactly like this old ES5 code:

function Derived() {
    Base.call(this);
}

...in:

function Base() {
}

function Derived() {
    Base.call(this);
}
Derived.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);
Derived.prototype.constructor = Derived;

Why is super() required? Even when I've no intention of calling the base constructor.

If you have no intention of calling the base constructor, then your subclass isn't a subclass and shouldn't be extending the base. In a strictly-typed language you'd probably make the base (or a subset of the base) an interface and have your class implement that rather than subclassing. In JavaScript, no need, just make it quack like the duck you want it to be. If an instanceof relationship is important, create a new base that will act like an interface but doesn't do anything anywhere, and have the old base and your class subclass it directly.

  • Is super() here calling the base constructor() AND setting the prototype? Seems wrong that I'm required to call a super() I didn't asked. – old May 10 '16 at 17:19
  • @old: Updated the answer just now, saw your edit. – T.J. Crowder May 10 '16 at 17:21
  • Perhaps my question is more towards to why calling the super() is required. – old May 10 '16 at 17:36
  • It isn't strictly required. You could also return something, so if it auto-added super() at the beginning, you'd be doing extra work. It's also not quite exactly like the ES5 code though, as this is uninitialized until you've called super() so there isn't even an object to have a prototype yet. – loganfsmyth May 10 '16 at 17:56
  • @old: It is required to correctly initialize this. If you think it should be called implicitly, which arguments should be passed to it? – Felix Kling May 10 '16 at 18:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Axel FTW http://www.2ality.com/2015/02/es6-classes-final.html

Summary

Why super is required?

  • The new keyword class isn't just syntax sugar.
  • Allocation and instantiation only happens in the base constructor.

But why this?

  • To allow exotic objects to be extended (thank you Felix Kling).

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