-1

I have in my java process code that opens a file for writing using Files.newOutputStream which is inside the try-with-resources statement. After I finishing writing the files (all written in the same way) and closed. They deleted together with the folder that files are inside of it.

String folder = "folder"
    try(OutputStream out = Files.newOutputStream(Paths.get(folder + '/' + fileName), StandardOpenOption.CREATE, StandardOpenOption.WRITE)) {
        //...
        out.write(buffer);
        //...
    } catch(IOException excp) {
        excp.printStackTrace();
    }
    FileUtils.forceDelete(new File(folder));

But, when I'm looking in the lsof (I'm running CentOS) I see that those files (and there could be 20k or 30k) are shown as (deleted) in lsof and means that they are open. I can't understand how closed file can remains open and eventually I get too many open file descriptors. So, I know that I can raise the limit, but I want to properly close or to make file closed instead of increasing limits.

Thanks !!!

  • 1
    Please edit your question to include the relevant source code from your java program. Ie, the code that creates these files, writes to them, and deletes them. – Kenster May 10 '16 at 22:26
  • @SlavaG, What is FileUtils? apache commons io? – lincolnadym May 11 '16 at 1:33
  • @lincolnadym FileUtils.forceDelete is Apache FileUtils, correct. – SlavaG May 11 '16 at 5:40
  • @SlavaG, based on the comments below, I think the reason you are getting all those lingering File handles in lsof is that new File(folder). – lincolnadym May 11 '16 at 20:24
  • @SlavaG, That line of code is your issue, FileUtils.forceDelete(new File(folder)); I downloaded the apache-commons-io source and checked the FileUtils.forceDelete() code...It creates an array of File[] objects, which is creating all those File Handles in lsof. – lincolnadym May 11 '16 at 20:40
-3

I think you aren't actually closing the files...for lsof it's a File Handle that's not getting closed.

Maybe add the finally {} block to your code :

OutputStream out = null
try {
    out = Files.newOutputStream(Paths.get(folder + '/' + fileName), StandardOpenOption.CREATE, StandardOpenOption.WRITE)) {
    //...
    out.write(buffer);
    //...
} catch(IOException excp) {
    excp.printStackTrace();
}
finally { 
    if ( out != null ) { out.close(); } 
} 
FileUtils.forceDelete(new File(folder));

Make sure you test the out for not null, otherwise it'll throw a NullPointerException when you try and close.

EDIT : Forgot to move the OutputStream outside the try{} catch{} finally {}...

  • The way the try {Outputstream} pattern works, is it should automatically close the File once it gets out of scope. I wonder if the FileUtils call is actually creating a new File Handle on the File. – lordoku May 11 '16 at 1:24
  • Hmmm, what's new File (folder) create inside the FileUtils.forceDelete(new File(folder))? The code would 'suggest' a 'single' new File handle, but if folder is filled with say 100 files, does the FileUtils, create 100 new File() handles? – lincolnadym May 11 '16 at 1:32
  • @lincolnadym There is no such thing as a 'File handle'. They are just objects, with no connection to the file system. – user207421 May 11 '16 at 1:58
  • @lincolnadym FileUtils.forceDelete is Apache FileUtils commons.apache.org/proper/commons-io/javadocs/api-1.4/org/… – SlavaG May 11 '16 at 5:22
  • @EJP in Java, yes they are objects, but each File that is open creates an handle on the OS. – lordoku May 11 '16 at 16:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.