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How to find out in Eclipse if certain method is potentially invoked or reachable (directly or indirectly) from another method?

Assume I want to refactor A.one() which can be negatively influenced by a side-effect in D.four(). Therefore I'd like to find out if D.four() can potentially be invoked from A.one(). I can see which methods are called from A.one() using the Call Hierarchy. I can navigate the call tree and eventually find that A.one() calls B.two() which calls C.three() which calls D.four().

Is there a way in Eclipse to make this search somehow automatic?

ps. There's a "Filters..." option in Call Hierarchy Dialog, but it only hides matching names.

3 Answers 3

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This is a modified version of the way you (@lexicore) found, that involves significantly less button punching (my changes in bold):

  • Open Call Hierarchy for A.one(), Show Callee Hierarchy.
  • Select the root node, and press the * key until the whole tree is expanded. Note that you only need to press * on the root node. This will expand the whole tree in "no time".
  • Right mouse click, Copy Expanded Hierarchy.
  • Paste into a text file.
  • Full-text search for D.four().

Notes

  • The key * expands all unexpanded leaf nodes one level.
  • The keys + and - works for expanding and closing just the selected node.
  • I've tried this on a Swedish keyboard, where * is located in a different place than on a US keyboard, but hopefully Eclipse won't care about that.

Update

Here is some documentation, where the * key is mentioned.

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  • *! Thanks! My colleagues asked me to thank you sincerely. :)
    – lexicore
    Commented Sep 15, 2010 at 7:52
  • Great! I just noticed that numpad * (It's called Numpad_Multiply in Eclipse) works too. Commented Sep 15, 2010 at 7:58
  • Interestingly enough, I can not find any documentation on these key bindings. When I go into Preferences->General->Keys, where "all" key bindings are defined, these keys are not bound to anything. Commented Sep 15, 2010 at 8:19
  • 1
    Here is some documentation, where the * key is mentioned: eclipse-tools.sourceforge.net/call-hierarchy/usage.html Commented Sep 15, 2010 at 8:21
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We've just encountered a way. Not really "automatic", involves a lot of ->-button punching. :)

  • Open Call Hierarchy for A.one(), Show Callee Hierarchy.
  • Start from the root, expand the whole tree by clicking the -> button many many times. Really many times. :)
  • Right mouse click, Copy Expanded Hierarchy.
  • Paste into a text file.
  • Full-text search for D.four().

I hope there are better ways not involving punching the ->-button.

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The simplest way that I know of, is to navigate manually to D.four(), use the Call Hierarchy on that method and see if A.one() is contained in the hierarchy.

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  • I'll need to manually search through the whole hierarchy to do this. A bit hard it the tree is large.
    – lexicore
    Commented Sep 15, 2010 at 7:12

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