31

Consider the below.

#include <string>
using std::string;

string middle_name () {
    return "Jaan";
}

int main ()
{
    string&& danger = middle_name();   // ?!
    return 0;
}

This doesn't compute anything, but it compiles without error and demonstrates something that I find confusing: danger is a dangling reference, isn't it?

  • 2
    puzzles me that you can use && on the left side at all, when would that be useful? – Viktor Sehr Sep 15 '10 at 9:31
  • 2
    @Viktor: An rvalue reference can bind to a temporary and still be modifiable. Eg int &&variable_or_dummy = modify_var? move(var) : int(); – Potatoswatter Sep 15 '10 at 9:50
  • One you name an rvalue it becomes an lvalue so in main danger is an lvalue. rvalueness or lvalueness is a property of an expression – Peter McG Oct 6 '10 at 4:37
42

Do rvalue references allow dangling references?

If you meant "Is it possible to create dangling rvalue references" then the answer is yes. Your example, however,

string middle_name () {
    return "Jaan";
}

int main()
{
    string&& nodanger = middle_name();   // OK.
    // The life-time of the temporary is extended
    // to the life-time of the reference.
    return 0;
}

is perfectly fine. The same rule applies here that makes this example (article by Herb Sutter) safe as well. If you initialize a reference with a pure rvalue, the life-time of the tempoary object gets extended to the life-time of the reference. You can still produce dangling references, though. For example, this is not safe anymore:

int main()
{
    string&& danger = std::move(middle_name());  // dangling reference !
    return 0;
}

Because std::move returns a string&& (which is not a pure rvalue) the rule that extends the temporary's life-time doesn't apply. Here, std::move returns a so-called xvalue. An xvalue is just an unnamed rvalue reference. As such it could refer to anything and it is basically impossible to guess what a returned reference refers to without looking at the function's implementation.

  • 4
    Excellent example of well-intentioned move-ing gone awry! – Potatoswatter Sep 15 '10 at 9:46
  • 1
    @kts: No. It wouldn't even compile because you can't initialize a non-const lvalue reference with an rvalue expression. If you write string const& danger = move(middle_name()); it won't work either. It'll compile but danger will be a dangling reference. – sellibitze Sep 15 '10 at 12:05
  • 2
    Is there an intuition for why this requires pure rvalues? The xvalue case seems perfectly reasonable... – Andres Jaan Tack Sep 15 '10 at 19:01
  • 6
    @Andres: I tried to explain this in the answer. Only when the initializer is a pure rvalue the compiler knows exactly what the to-be-initialized reference will refer to. In this case, the correct temporary's life-time can and will be extended easily. If the initializer itself is a reference you don't really know in general what object exactly it refers to. std::move doesn't mean anything to the compiler. The information that the result of std::move refers to the same object is not preserved in the function's type. – sellibitze Sep 15 '10 at 21:34
  • 3
    @sellibitze That makes sense! A referenced object's lifetime can have any kind of lifetime, where a pure rvalue's lifetime is easily predicted and thus trivially extended. – Andres Jaan Tack Sep 16 '10 at 0:12
15

rvalue references bind to rvalues. An rvalue is either a prvalue or an xvalue [explanation]. Binding to the former never creates a dangling reference, binding to the latter might. That's why it's generally a bad idea to choose T&& as the return type of a function. std::move is an exception to this rule.

T&  lvalue();
T   prvalue();
T&& xvalue();

T&& does_not_compile = lvalue();
T&& well_behaved = prvalue();
T&& problematic = xvalue();
  • +1 You're right, it's a good rule of thumb not to write functions that return rvalue references. std::move and std::forward are the obvious exceptions. – sellibitze Sep 15 '10 at 12:42
3

danger is a dangling reference, isn't it?

Not any more than if you had used a const &: danger takes ownership of the rvalue.

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