12

I am trying to traverse this XML data full of parent->child relationships and need a way to build a tree. Any help will be really appreciated. Also, in this case, is it better to have attributes or nodes for the parent-->child relationship?

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<nodes>
    <node name="Car" child="Engine"/>
    <node name="Car" child="Wheel"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Piston"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Carb"/>
    <node name="Carb" child="Bolt"/>
    <node name="Spare Wheel"/>
    <node name="Bolt" child="Thread"/>
    <node name="Carb" child="Foat"/>
    <node name="Truck" child="Engine"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Bolt"/>
    <node name="Wheel" child="Hubcap"/>
</nodes>

On the Python Script, this is what i have. My brain is fried and I cannot get the logic going? please help

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
tree = ET.parse('rec.xml')
root = tree.getroot()
def find_node(data,search):
    #str = root.find('.//node[@child="1.2.1"]')
    for node in data.findall('.//node'):
        if node.attrib['name']==search:
            print('Child-->', node)

for nodes in root.findall('node'):
    parent = nodes.attrib.get('name')
    child = nodes.attrib.get('child')
    print (parent,'-->', child)
    find_node(root,child)

A possible output that is expected is something like this (really dont care about the sorting order, As long as all node items are represented somewhere in the tree.

Car --> Engine --> Piston
Car --> Engine --> Carb --> Float
Car --> Engine --> Carb --> Bolt --> Thread
Car --> Wheel --> Hubcaps
Truck --> Engine --> Piston
Truck --> Engine --> Carb --> Bolt --> Thread
Truck --> Loading Bin
Spare Wheel -->
  • I want to sort out bpmn process models where [parent] = the model name of the process, and [child] = the activities on that process. i only have a list of models with activity objects, but some of those activities are defined as a model [parent] with their own children. Im not too fussed on the specific output, but I placed 1.2 at the top level because it is never the child of any other model... – Hightower May 12 '16 at 12:31
  • 2
    Your question was so interesting, I posted a related one. I had an XSLT solution and almost posted but unsatisfied, I had to invite the XSLT gurus for a more dynamic solution. – Parfait May 23 '16 at 3:26
  • As for an XSLT solution, I just posted one. It is also computationally the simplest one -- compare nesting level 1 to nesting level of 4 - 5 ... The transformation can simply be invoked from Python. Enjoy :) – Dimitre Novatchev May 24 '16 at 4:00
  • 1
    As @DimitreNovatchev suggests, use Python's lxml module to run the XSLT. You avoid any looping in Python. – Parfait May 24 '16 at 4:02
2
+50

rec.xml:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<nodes>
    <node name="Car" child="Engine"></node>
    <node name="Engine" child="Piston"></node>
    <node name="Engine" child="Carb"></node>
    <node name="Car" child="Wheel"></node>
    <node name="Wheel" child="Hubcaps"></node>
    <node name="Truck" child="Engine"></node>
    <node name="Truck" child="Loading Bin"></node>
    <node name="Piston" child="Loa"></node>
    <node name="Piston" child="Loaqq"></node>
    <node name="Piston" child="Loaww"></node>
    <node name="Loaww" child="Loawwqqqqq"></node>
    <node name="Spare Wheel" child=""></node>
</nodes>

parse.py:-

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
tree = ET.parse('rec.xml')
root = tree.getroot()
data = {}
child_list = []
def recursive_print(string,x):
    if x in data.keys():
     for x_child in data[x]:
        if x_child in data.keys():
          recursive_print(string+'-------->'+x_child,x_child)
        else:
         print string+'-------->'+x_child
    else:
       print string

for nodes in root.findall('node'):
    parent = nodes.attrib.get('name')
    child = nodes.attrib.get('child')
    child_list.append(child)
    if parent not in data.keys():
        data[parent] = []
    data[parent].append(child)
for key in data.keys():
    if key not in child_list:
      for x in data[key]:
        string = key+'------->'+x
        recursive_print(string,x)

output:-

Spare Wheel------->
Car------->Engine-------->Piston-------->Loa
Car------->Engine-------->Piston-------->Loaqq
Car------->Engine-------->Piston-------->Loaww-------->Loawwqqqqq
Car------->Engine-------->Carb
Car------->Wheel-------->Hubcaps
Truck------->Engine-------->Piston-------->Loa
Truck------->Engine-------->Piston-------->Loaqq
Truck------->Engine-------->Piston-------->Loaww-------->Loawwqqqqq
Truck------->Engine-------->Carb
Truck------->Loading Bin
  • Looked at this code, Is there any reason why it only goes three nodes deep? – Hightower May 20 '16 at 11:41
  • 1
    There is no any restriction , code can goes deep up any number of node – Radhamohan Parashar May 20 '16 at 12:07
5

It has been a long time since I did anything with graphs but this should be pretty close it not the most optimal approach:

x = """<?xml version="1.0"?>
<nodes>
    <node name="Car" child="Engine"></node>
    <node name="Engine" child="Piston"></node>
    <node name="Engine" child="Carb"></node>
    <node name="Car" child="Wheel"></node>
    <node name="Wheel" child="Hubcaps"></node>
    <node name="Truck" child="Engine"></node>
    <node name="Truck" child="Loading Bin"></node>
    <nested>
        <node name="Spare Wheel" child="Engine"></node>
    </nested>
    <node name="Spare Wheel" child=""></node>

</nodes>"""

from lxml import etree

xml = etree.fromstring(x)
graph = {}
nodes = set()
for x in xml.xpath("//node"):
    par, child = x.xpath(".//@name")[0], x.xpath(".//@child")[0]
    graph.setdefault(par, set())
    graph[par].add(child)
    nodes.update([child, par])


def find_all_paths(graph, start, end, path=None):
    if path is None:
        path = []
    path = path + [start]
    if start == end:
        yield path
    for node in graph.get(start, []):
        if node not in path:
            for new_path in find_all_paths(graph, node, end, path):
                yield new_path


for n in graph:
    for e in nodes:
        if n != e:
            for path in find_all_paths(graph, n, e):
                if path:
                    print("--> ".join(path))

Which with the updated input would give you:

Engine--> Carb
Engine--> Piston
Car--> Engine
Car--> Wheel
Car--> Wheel--> Hubcaps
Car--> Engine--> Carb
Car--> Engine--> Piston
Spare Wheel--> Engine
Spare Wheel--> 
Spare Wheel--> Engine--> Carb
Spare Wheel--> Engine--> Piston
Wheel--> Hubcaps
Truck--> Engine
Truck--> Engine--> Carb
Truck--> Engine--> Piston
Truck--> Loading Bin
  • Hey. Yes, graph seems like it is the most elegant option. I will try to get the loop to search for nodes with no parents (to Filter the list) essentially the difficult thing is to add all children to a node that has children in the list. Also why does your "spare wheel show children?. Thanks though this answer really points me in the right direction! – Hightower May 16 '16 at 21:32
  • @Hightower, I slightly changed your input, nesting a Spare Wheel so you see extra output compared to your own. This is a rough draft of how to tackle the problem, if I get some time I will add some improvements and an iterative solution. – Padraic Cunningham May 16 '16 at 21:38
4

Here is a pure XSLT solution -- efficiently using keys (equivalent to hash-tables) and just 23 lines -- the shortest solution so far.

This is also computationally the simplest one -- compare nesting level 1 to nesting level of 4 - 5 ...

This solution is tail-recursive meaning that any good XSLT processor optimizes it with iteration, thus avoiding the possibility of stack-overflow, as the maximum call-stack depth remains constant (1).

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

 <xsl:key name="kNodeByChild" match="node" use="@child"/>
 <xsl:key name="kNodeByName" match="node" use="@name"/>

  <xsl:template match="/*">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="node[not(key('kNodeByChild', @name))]"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="node[not(key('kNodeByName', @child))]">
    <xsl:param name="pParentPath"/>
    <xsl:value-of select="concat($pParentPath, @name, ' ---> ', @child, '&#xA;')"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="node">
    <xsl:param name="pParentPath"/>

    <xsl:apply-templates select="key('kNodeByName', @child)">
      <xsl:with-param name="pParentPath" select="concat($pParentPath, @name, ' ---> ')"/>
    </xsl:apply-templates>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<nodes>
    <node name="Car" child="Engine"/>
    <node name="Car" child="Wheel"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Piston"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Carb"/>
    <node name="Carb" child="Bolt"/>
    <node name="Spare Wheel"/>
    <node name="Bolt" child="Thread"/>
    <node name="Carb" child="Foat"/>
    <node name="Truck" child="Engine"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Bolt"/>
    <node name="Wheel" child="Hubcap"/>
</nodes>

The wanted, correct result is produced:

Car ---> Engine ---> Piston
Car ---> Engine ---> Carb ---> Bolt ---> Thread
Car ---> Engine ---> Carb ---> Foat
Car ---> Engine ---> Bolt ---> Thread
Car ---> Wheel ---> Hubcap
Spare Wheel ---> 
Truck ---> Engine ---> Piston
Truck ---> Engine ---> Carb ---> Bolt ---> Thread
Truck ---> Engine ---> Carb ---> Foat
Truck ---> Engine ---> Bolt ---> Thread
-2

rec.xml:-

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" standalone="yes"?>
<nodes>
    <node name="Car" child="Engine"/>
    <node name="Car" child="Wheel"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Piston"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Carb"/>
    <node name="Carb" child="Bolt"/>
    <node name="Spare Wheel"/>
    <node name="Bolt" child="Thread"/>
    <node name="Carb" child="Foat"/>
    <node name="Truck" child="Engine"/>
    <node name="Engine" child="Bolt"/>
    <node name="Wheel" child="Hubcap"/>
</nodes>

Pars.py

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
tree = ET.parse('rec.xml')
root = tree.getroot()
tree = []
tree1 = []
uses_list = []
class Tree(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.child = []
        self.data = None

def tree_print(parent,x):
       string = x.data
       if x.data is not None:
        if len(x.child) == 0:
         print parent,x.data
       if len(x.child) > 0:
         for  x1 in x.child:
          tree_print(parent+x.data+'----------->',x1)

for nodes in root.findall('node'):
    parent = nodes.attrib.get('name')
    child = nodes.attrib.get('child')
    uses_list.append(child)
    if parent not in uses_list:
        tree_root = Tree()
        tree_root.data = parent
        if child is not None:
          child_obj = Tree()
          child_obj.data = child
          tree_root.child.append(child_obj)
          tree.append(child_obj)
        tree1.append(tree_root)
        tree.append(tree_root)
    else:
       for tree_root in tree:
         for child_o in tree_root.child:
          if parent == child_o.data:
            if child is not None:
              child_obj = Tree()
              child_obj.data = child
              child_o.child.append(child_obj)
              tree.append(child_obj)
for x in tree1:
     tree_print('',x)

OUTPUT :-

Car----------->Engine-----------> Piston
Car----------->Engine----------->Carb----------->Bolt-----------> Thread
Car----------->Engine----------->Carb-----------> Foat
Car----------->Engine-----------> Bolt
Car----------->Wheel-----------> Hubcap
 Spare Wheel
Truck----------->Engine-----------> Bolt
  • thanks for the effort! .the solution is working perfectly, - in this answer, the last occurence of Bolt does not include Bolt-----------> Thread :) – Hightower May 21 '16 at 12:08
  • Thanks , I am trying to make it best , soon will edit where the answer will be perfect for every case – Radhamohan Parashar May 21 '16 at 12:35

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