34

I have a stream of objects and I need to compare if the current object is not the same as the previous and in this case emit a new value. I found distinctUntilChanged operator should do exactly what I want, but for some reason, it never emits value except the first one. If I remove distinctUntilChanged values are emitted normally.

My code:

export class SettingsPage {
    static get parameters() {
        return [[NavController], [UserProvider]];
    }

    constructor(nav, user) {
        this.nav = nav;
        this._user = user;

        this.typeChangeStream = new Subject();
        this.notifications = {};
    }

    ngOnInit() {

        this.typeChangeStream
            .map(x => {console.log('value on way to distinct', x); return x;})
            .distinctUntilChanged(x => JSON.stringify(x))
            .subscribe(settings => {
                console.log('typeChangeStream', settings);
                this._user.setNotificationSettings(settings);
            });
    }

    toggleType() {
        this.typeChangeStream.next({
            "sound": true,
            "vibrate": false,
            "badge": false,
            "types": {
                "newDeals": true,
                "nearDeals": true,
                "tematicDeals": false,
                "infoWarnings": false,
                "expireDeals": true
            }
        });
    }

    emitDifferent() {
        this.typeChangeStream.next({
            "sound": false,
            "vibrate": false,
            "badge": false,
            "types": {
                "newDeals": false,
                "nearDeals": false,
                "tematicDeals": false,
                "infoWarnings": false,
                "expireDeals": false
            }
        });
    }
}
5
  • Is typeChangeStream an Observable? Hard to tell what's wrong without seeing what code is creating that / etc. – Mark Pieszak - Trilon.io May 11 '16 at 20:34
  • Please have a look at stackoverflow.com/help/mcve for guidelines to deal with 'it does not work' questions. Basically post a minimally verifiable example that reproduces the error, and post the expected behaviour and how it is different from the current behavior. Talk about JSON stringifying you need to know that it is not a bullet proof method for checking equality of objects. {"a" : 2, "b":1} is for example different from {"b":1, "a":2} while these are the same objects – user3743222 May 11 '16 at 23:02
  • Sorry for that, i added more code. I don't need bullet proof object equality check, i am sure in this case object will be everytime i same order. – Daniel Suchý May 12 '16 at 5:25
  • did u solve this problem? i have the same with BehaviorSubject, and it emits prev and curr same result, wtf.. – Den Kerny Mar 6 '20 at 8:21
  • @DanielSuchý it would be good IMO to accept the answer that did work for you – Mehdi Benmoha Jan 29 at 11:17
48

I had the same problem, and fixed it with using JSON.stringify to compare the objects:

.distinctUntilChanged((a, b) => JSON.stringify(a) === JSON.stringify(b))

Dirty but working code.

9
  • I am filling in my input my unit cost for a product, with the same logic, but now I can only type 1 number at a time , unless i go back and click on the field. I would like to be able to type in multiple digits at a time which is the normal default. How can I do this – user3701188 Sep 12 '18 at 21:35
  • 1
    Have you tried the throttling or debouncing rxJS operators ? – Mehdi Benmoha Sep 13 '18 at 10:03
  • that was the 1st thing I thought of, to use debounce but what I realised was when I type in the 1st digit the input loses focus then after the time span the values are emitted so it doesnt allow me to finish typing – user3701188 Sep 13 '18 at 20:05
  • 1
    this will give you incorrect true when you delete a property and add it back. – Milad Nov 15 '18 at 5:00
  • 3
    I didn't understand your scenario, JSON.stringify will simply convert the object to string. Even if you don't have the same properties order it won't work ! – Mehdi Benmoha Nov 20 '18 at 13:14
24

I finally figure out where problem is. Problem was in version of RxJS, in V4 and earlier is different parameters order than V5.

RxJS 4:

distinctUntilChanged = function (keyFn, comparer)

RxJS 5:

distinctUntilChanged = function (comparer, keyFn)

In every docs today, you can find V4 parameters order, beware of that!

2
  • How did you fix this? What did you change? If you can tell this it would be great. – Alwaysalearner Aug 16 '18 at 13:35
  • 1
    @Harsimer swap comparer and key function – n0mer Sep 24 '19 at 19:56
19

When you have lodash in your application anyway, you can simply utilize lodash's isEqual() function, which does a deep comparison and perfectly matches the signature of distinctUntilChanged():

.distinctUntilChanged(isEqual),

Or if you have _ available (which is not recommended anymore these days):

.distinctUntilChanged(_.isEqual),
9

From RxJS v6+ there is distinctUntilKeyChanged

https://www.learnrxjs.io/operators/filtering/distinctuntilkeychanged.html

const source$ = from([
  { name: 'Brian' },
  { name: 'Joe' },
  { name: 'Joe' },
  { name: 'Sue' }
]);

source$
  // custom compare based on name property
  .pipe(distinctUntilKeyChanged('name'))
  // output: { name: 'Brian }, { name: 'Joe' }, { name: 'Sue' }
  .subscribe(console.log);
1
  • 1
    FYI, if name was an object like {name: {first: 'Brian'}} this doesn't work as it doesn't compare the the entire objects. – pjdicke Dec 18 '20 at 19:19
5

You can also wrap the original distinctUntilChanged function.

function distinctUntilChangedObj<T>() {
  return distinctUntilChanged<T>((a, b) => JSON.stringify(a) === JSON.stringify(b));
}

This lets you use it just like the original.

$myObservable.pipe(
  distinctUntilChangedObj()
)
5
  • even though it works, it messes with the pipeline objects – Frik Aug 17 '20 at 16:11
  • @Frik how so? JSON.stringify() shouldn't mess/mutate anything right? If you have circular json in your objects, then you might need to use another package which can stringify it properly npmjs.com/package/circular-json – Ben Winding Aug 18 '20 at 0:53
  • you are correct. However, there seems to be a bug with WebStorm where it does not see the value o in the tap operator... so you don't have code completion for some reason... from([ { name: 'Brian' }, ]).pipe( distinctUntilChangedObj(), tap(o => console.log(o.name)) ).subscribe(); – Frik Aug 19 '20 at 6:33
  • 1
    If you're using typescript, then you could also do function distinctUntilChangedObj<T>() { return distinctUntilChanged<T>((a, b) => JSON.stringify(a) === JSON.stringify(b)); }. This will preserve the type correctly, but only if you're using typescript – Ben Winding Aug 19 '20 at 7:54
  • 1
    Nice answer! This will be very useful. – pjdicke Dec 18 '20 at 19:16
3

Mehdi's solution although fast but wouldn't work if the order is not maintained. Using one of deep-equal or fast-deep-equal libraries:

.distinctUntilChanged((a, b) => deepEqual(a, b))
1

The answers suggesting a deep compare all fail if the observable is actually emitting a modified version of the same object, as the "last" value that is passed to the comparison will be the same as the current, every time.

We've hit this using a BehaviorSubject where it just so happens that the same object is passed to .next() each time.

In this case, there is no solution using the default distinctUntilChanged, no matter what comparison function you use.

0
0

You can also make your own filter:

function compareObjects(a: any, b: any): boolean {
  return JSON.stringify(a) === JSON.stringify(b);
}

export function distinctUntilChangedObject() {
  return function<T>(source: Observable<T>): Observable<T> {
    return new Observable(subscriber => {
      let prev: any;
      let first = true;
      source.subscribe({
        next(value) {
          if (first) {
            prev = value;
            subscriber.next(value);
            first = false;
          } else if (!compareObjects(prev, value)) {
            prev = value;
            subscriber.next(value);
          }
        },
        error(error) {
          subscriber.error(error);
        },
        complete() {
          subscriber.complete();
        }
      });
    });
  };
}
-1

If you change the value mutably, none of the other answers work. If you need to work with mutable data structures, you can use distinctUntilChangedImmutable, which deep copies the previous value and if no comparison function is passed in, will assert that the previous and the current values deep equals each other (not === assertion).

1
  • Class constructor Subscriber cannot be invoked without 'new' at new DistinctUntilChangedSubscriber – Den Kerny Mar 6 '20 at 8:03

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