1

This question already has an answer here:

When I pass a char array through a method and use the sizeof method, it comes out different than if I were to use sizeof directly. Anybody know why and how I can fix this simple mistake?

#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    char c[5];
    char car[] = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };;
    int num = my_strlen(c);

    printf("%d \n", sizeof(c));
    printf("%d \n", sizeof(car));

    printf("%d \n", my_strlen(c));
    printf("%d \n", my_strlen(car));


    return 0;
}

int my_strlen(char s[]) // returns number of characters in a string
{
    return sizeof(s);
}

Output:

5
3
8
8

marked as duplicate by MikeCAT, Jonathan Leffler c May 12 '16 at 2:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • printf("%d \n", sizeof(c)); and printf("%d \n", sizeof(car)); invoke undefined behavior by passing data having wrong type to printf(). Format %zu should be used to print size_t, which is sizeof's result. – MikeCAT May 12 '16 at 2:21
  • You should declare or define functions before using them. – MikeCAT May 12 '16 at 2:21
  • You can't pass an array into a function, and you aren't passing an array into a function here. – immibis May 12 '16 at 2:22
1

Arrays decay to pointers when used as arguments, this implies that

int my_strlen(char s[])
{
  return sizeof(s);
}

is instead

int my_strlen(char* s)
{
  return sizeof(s);
}

So sizeof(s) == sizeof(char*) == sizeof(void*) which apparently is 8 bytes on your machine because you are running on a 64 architecture.

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