I have a dataframe like this, which tracks the value of certain items (ids) over time:

mytime=np.tile( np.arange(0,10) , 2 )
myids=np.repeat( [123,456], [10,10] )
myvalues=np.random.random_integers(20,30,10*2)

df=pd.DataFrame()
df['myids']=myids
df['mytime']=mytime
df['myvalues']=myvalues



+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| myids | mytime | myvalues |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 0      | 29       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 1      | 23       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 2      | 26       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 3      | 24       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 4      | 25       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 5      | 29       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 6      | 28       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 7      | 21       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 8      | 20       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 123   | 9      | 26       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 0      | 26       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 1      | 24       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 2      | 20       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 3      | 26       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 4      | 29       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 5      | 29       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 6      | 24       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 7      | 21       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 8      | 27       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+
| 456   | 9      | 29       |  |  |
+-------+--------+----------+--+--+

I'd need to calculate the running maximum for each id.

np.maximum.accumulate()

would calculate the running maximum regardless of id, whereas I need a similar calculation, which however resets every time the id changes. I can think of a simple script to do it in numba (I have very large arrays and non-vectorised non-numba code would be slow), but is there an easier way to do it?

With just two values I can run:

df['running max']= np.hstack((  np.maximum.accumulate(df[ df['myids']==123 ]['myvalues']) , np.maximum.accumulate(df[ df['myids']==456 ]['myvalues']) )  )

but this is not feasible with lots and lots of values.

Thanks!

  • pandas groupby — you can write and accept your own answer... – gboffi May 12 '16 at 12:02
  • I group by myids, then, what exactly? I'm sure it's just me being thick, but I come from a SQL background and I really struggle to get my head around pandas (also, the atrocious documentation doesn't help)... – Pythonista anonymous May 12 '16 at 12:08
  • df.groupby('myid')['myvalues'].cummax() is pretty close, but I don't know how to proceed further... .cummax() takes an axis= argument but, as a pandas ignoramus. i don't know how to use it (anyway it's not exactly a numpy axis=) – gboffi May 12 '16 at 13:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here you go. Assumption is mytime is sorted.

mytime=np.tile( np.arange(0,10) , 2 )
myids=np.repeat( [123,456], [10,10] )
myvalues=np.random.random_integers(20,30,10*2)

df=pd.DataFrame()
df['myids']=myids
df['mytime']=mytime
df['myvalues']=myvalues

groups = df.groupby('myids')
df['run_max_group'] = groups['myvalues'].transform(np.maximum.accumulate)

Output...

    myids  mytime  myvalues  run_max_group
0     123       0        27             27
1     123       1        21             27
2     123       2        24             27
3     123       3        25             27
4     123       4        22             27
5     123       5        20             27
6     123       6        20             27
7     123       7        30             30
8     123       8        24             30
9     123       9        22             30
10    456       0        29             29
11    456       1        23             29
12    456       2        30             30
13    456       3        28             30
14    456       4        26             30
15    456       5        25             30
16    456       6        28             30
17    456       7        27             30
18    456       8        20             30
19    456       9        24             30
  • Is transform() documented anywhere? This link: pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/… shows literally nothing. This other link : pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/… says something but not a lot – Pythonista anonymous May 12 '16 at 14:56
  • 1
    I'm not familiar with documentation. I can try to explain it... If you know how the aggregate function works you know how transform does. It simply expands the resulting value from aggregate to match the size of the group. So lets say I have group a with values [1, 2, 3] and group b with values [3, 4, 5]. If I do groups.aggregate(max) I will get back a=3 and b=5. groups.transform will give me a=[3,3,3] and b=[5,5,5]. This makes modifying or adding to an existing DataFrame a lot easier. – Bruce Pucci May 12 '16 at 15:20

It seems that it is indeed not too difficult

byid = df.groupby('myid')
rmax = byid['myvalues].cummax()
for k, indices in byid.indices.items():
    print 'myid = %s' % k
    print 'running max = %s' % rmax[indices]

I have (almost) no previous pandas, but using ipython as an exploratory instrument I was able to find a solution. I recommend the use of ipython to explore large and complex libraries.

p.s. re my previous comment: no need for axis=

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