1

I'd like to format a number to maximum N decimal places. There's another similar and popular question here, but that's not exactly what I'm looking for.

I'm looking for something like this, let's say I want max. 2 places, so this would be:

1.00  -> "1"    (not "1.00")
1.20  -> "1.2"  (not "1.20")
1.23  -> "1.23"
1.234 -> "1.23"
1.235 -> "1.24"

The difference to the other question is that I don't want trailing zeros behind the comma if I don't need them.

I'd like to know whether this is doable with String.format(), not with Math.round(), or DecimalFormat. The other question shown above provides a solution with DecimalFormat.

The answer does not need to be variable given N as an argument. I just chose N as an example.

  • Please look at the second answer to the question you mentioned. – Arkadiy May 13 '16 at 0:47
  • Take a look at using BigDecimal (One of the answers from the question you linked to) – Krease May 13 '16 at 0:51
  • Solution posted to do just with String.format(); – PseudoAj May 13 '16 at 1:12
  • @Arkadiy - The second answer is DecimalFormat, not String.format(), right? – mac May 13 '16 at 1:28
  • 1
    You can use DecimalFormat and%s – Arkadiy May 13 '16 at 1:30
3

You can use DecimalFormat.

Quoting the documentation:

You can use the DecimalFormat class to format decimal numbers into locale-specific strings. This class allows you to control the display of leading and trailing zeros, prefixes and suffixes, grouping (thousands) separators, and the decimal separator.

The pound sign (#) denotes a digit and the period is a placeholder for the decimal separator.

public void test(){
    DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
    System.out.println(df.format(1.00));
    System.out.println(df.format(1.20));
    System.out.println(df.format(1.23));
    System.out.println(df.format(1.234));
    System.out.println(df.format(1.235));
}

Output:

1
1.2
1.23
1.23
1.24

Update: since you updated the question and you wanted to use String.format, searching in SO found this thread and leverage a trick plus regex. So, you could use something like this:

public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
{
    System.out.println(fmt(1.00));
    System.out.println(fmt(1.20));
    System.out.println(fmt(1.23));
    System.out.println(fmt(1.234));
    System.out.println(fmt(1.235));
}

public static String fmt(double d)
{
    if(d == (long) d)
        return String.format("%d",(long)d);
    else
        return String.format("%.2f",d).replaceAll("0*$", "");
}

The output is:

1
1.2
1.23
1.23
1.24

Anyway, I would use DecimalFormat instead.

  • How would you put the decimal places in terms of N? – 4castle May 13 '16 at 0:56
  • @4castle Just make sure there are N # symbols after the decimal point in the format string. – user207421 May 13 '16 at 1:29
  • Is there a way to encode that with the formatter, or would you have to construct the pattern in a loop with a StringBuilder? – 4castle May 13 '16 at 1:30
  • @Downvoter: why the downvote? – Federico Piazza May 13 '16 at 3:03
  • @4castle: you could put multiple ######## as you want. Just put 1 as OP example. If # is found then it is used, is not nothing happens. Different than using 00#.##00, which will populate remaining characters with zeros – Federico Piazza May 13 '16 at 3:05
2

You can also control the formatting of DecimalFormat using setMaximumFractionDigits(...) like so:

double d = 1.234567;
DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat();
for (int i = 2; i < 6; ++i) {
  df.setMaximumFractionDigits(i);
  System.out.println(df.format(d));
}

This might be better for your use case than generating a format using StringBuilder or similar.

  • By default, DecimalFormat uses RoundingMode.HALF_EVEN which behaves unexpectedly when rounding a 5. To fix that, do df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.HALF_UP); – 4castle May 13 '16 at 3:34
0

Another solution if you still want to do it with String.format(), here is the solution:

Java Code: ParseN.java

public class ParseN{

     public static void main(String []args){
        System.out.println(parseN(1.00));
        System.out.println(parseN(1.20));
        System.out.println(parseN(1.23));
        System.out.println(parseN(1.234));
        System.out.println(parseN(1.235));
     }

     static String parseN(Double d)
     {
       String s = String.format("%.2f", d);
       s = s.indexOf(".") < 0 ? s : s.replaceAll("0*$", "").replaceAll("\\.$", "");
       return s;
     }
}

output:

1
1.2
1.23
1.23
1.24

Hope it fully answers your question. Also, refer this.

  • You can consolidate the 2 regex to be \\.?0*$. Also, there will always be a decimal point in the resulting string, so the indexOf ternary isn't needed. If you put N into the format string, this may be the most complete answer yet. – 4castle May 13 '16 at 1:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.