2

I have a model AdminUser, a folder admin_users in my views with 2 views only (dashboard and index), and an AdminUsersController which is:

class AdminUsersController < ApplicationController
  def dashboard
  end

  def index
  end

  def login
    if params[:admin_user][:username].present? && params[:admin_user][:password].present?
      found_user = AdminUser.where(:username => params[:admin_user][:username]).first
      if found_user
        authorized_user = found_user.authenticate(params[:admin_user][:password])
        session[:admin]=params[:admin_user][:username]
      end
    end
    if authorized_user
       redirect_to :controller => 'admin_users', :action => 'dashboard'
    else
      render :nothing => true, :status => :ok
    end 
  end
end

Although I have an action for login, I do not have a view for it, because I don't really need it.

But the fact that Rails searches for a view make me think that I am doing something wrong; or at least not doing something the Rails-y way.

Should I do this in another way?

7
  • 1
    thats right. if you dont have need of view then you can skip it. like we dont have need views for destroy and create May 13 '16 at 10:45
  • 2
    Normally it's best to adhere to the standard names that map to the REST endpoints generated by resources in the routes.rb file. What you have here is a bit of a mess, with dashboard being better off as index or show in DashboardController. Having several sparsely populated controllers is usually better than one crammed full of junk. Also don't forget AdminUser.find_by(username: ...) is better than where(...).first.
    – tadman
    May 13 '16 at 11:34
  • @tadman Thank you so much for your suggestions. "Having several sparsely populated controllers is usually better than one crammed full of junk." Do you suggest I should use more than one controller for admin_users? This seems a bit odd to me, I thought it's one controller for each model? May 13 '16 at 11:51
  • 1
    It will seem odd at first, especially if some have only one action, but in the long run it keeps things organized. You'll also want to make a base controller for all your admin operations to inherit from, one that checks to see if a person has the right role before letting them do anything.
    – tadman
    May 13 '16 at 11:55
  • @tadman Should I for example, use "admin_users_controller" for only the methods with views and create an "admin_users_login_controller" only for the login function? May 13 '16 at 12:08
8

You are not required to have a view. In fact quite a few good reasons exist to not need a view:

  • actions that redirect before returning, such as the standard Rails create and update actions
  • actions that render inline, such as CSV generators
  • actions that render ajax results
  • actions that are endpoints for REST APIs

The conventions are there for the most common circumstances, but there are also conventions for lesser common, and still valid situations.

Note that methods that are not intended to be renderable actions should be placed in the protected or private section of the class to keep them separated from actual actions. Don't expose any methods in the public interface of the controller, except those that are intended to be actions.

If you do happen to have an action (as does the example in the question), you can convince Rails to bypass the search for a view corresponding to the action by returning early. While it would seem like redirect_to would be sufficient, it's actually only part of the response. The common way to do this is use the redirect_to :page and return idiom.

For the example given, use this:

if authorized_user
  redirect_to :controller => 'admin_users', :action => 'dashboard' and return
else
  render :nothing => true, :status => :ok
end 

See these excellent questions and answers for more detail:

2
  • 1
    That's a pretty good list! One thing worth mentioning is if you have a method that's not an action, that doesn't render, you should put it in the protected section to keep it organized.
    – tadman
    May 13 '16 at 11:31
  • 1
    @tadman Great suggestion. I added the note about non-public methods. It certainly adds something useful to the answer. Cheers! May 13 '16 at 17:16
5

Not having a view is completely fine. When you add methods to your controller that you don't want views for, such as create/update/destroy methods, you'll notice you need to add a "render" or "redirect_to" statement within that method that points to another view. This tells rails not to follow the norm and look for a view with that actions name.

0
2

There are many cases where controller actions do not need a corresponding view which are well covered by Michael Gaskill.

Another thing which you should be more worried about is the Single Responsibility Principle (SRP). Each controller in your application should ideally correspond to a single RESTful resource. A UsersController should only be responsible for CRUD'ing users for example.

The common setup for an auth system is to have a specific controller for sessions - its a pretty damn important part of the system so it merits its own controller.

A good practice is to try to stick to the standard CRUD actions (show, index, new, create, edit, update, destroy) as far as possible which we are doing below by treating sessions as a resource:

# config/routes.rb
resource :session

# create a helper for the authentication logic
# this avoids duplicating it all over your controllers!
module SessionsHelper
  def current_user
    @current_user ||= User.find(session[:user_id]) if session[:user_id]
  end
end

# minimal example
class SessionsController

  include SessionsHelper

  # the login screen shown to users
  def new
  end

  # sign in a user
  def create
    @user = User.find_by(email: params[:email])
                .try(:authenticate, params[:password])
    if @user
      reset_session
      session[:user_id] = @user.id
      @current_user = @user
      redirect_to root_path, success: 'You have been signed in.'
    else
      render :new, error: 'Incorrect email or password.'
    end
  end

  # sign out user
  def destroy
    if current_user
      reset_session
      redirect_to root_path, notice: 'You have been signed out.'
    else
      redirect_to root_path, error: 'You are not signed in'
    end
  end
end
0

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