27

I am working through a problem which i was able to solve, all but for the last piece - i am not sure how can one do multiplication using bitwise operators:

0*8 = 0

1*8 = 8

2*8 = 16 

3*8 = 24 

4*8 = 32

Can you please recommend an approach to solve this?

0
48

To multiply by any value of 2 to the power of N (i.e. 2^N) shift the bits N times to the left.

0000 0001 = 1 

times 4 = (2^2 => N = 2) = 2 bit shift : 0000 0100 = 4

times 8 = (2^3 -> N = 3) = 3 bit shift : 0010 0000 = 32

etc..

To divide shift the bits to the right.

The bits are whole 1 or 0 - you can't shift by a part of a bit thus if the number you're multiplying by is does not factor a whole value of N ie.

since: 17 = 16  + 1 
thus:  17 = 2^4 + 1

therefore: x * 17 = (x * 16) + x in other words 17 x's  

thus to multiply by 17 you have to do a 4 bit shift to the left, and then add the original number again:

==> x * 17 = (x * 16) + x 
==> x * 17 = (x * 2^4) + x 
==> x * 17 = (x shifted to left by 4 bits) + x 

so let x = 3 = 0000 0011 

times 16 = (2^4 => N = 4) = 4 bit shift : 0011 0000 = 48

plus the x (0000 0011)

ie.

    0011 0000  (48)  
+   0000 0011   (3)
=============
    0011 0011  (51)

Edit: Update to the original answer. Charles Petzold has written a fantastic book 'Code' that will explain all of this and more in the easiest of ways. I thoroughly recommend this.

1
  • right. it's not quite the same thing though. what if you want to multiply 3*17 Sep 15 '10 at 21:45
13

To multiply two binary encoded numbers without a multiply instruction. It would be simple to iteratively add to reach the product.

unsigned int mult(x, y)
unsigned int x, y;
{
    unsigned int reg = 0;

    while(y--)
        reg += x;
    return reg;
}

Using bit operations, the characteristic of the data encoding can be exploited. As explained previously, a bit shift is the same as multiply by two. Using this an adder can be used on the powers of two.

// multiply two numbers with bit operations

unsigned int mult(x, y)
unsigned int x, y;
{
    unsigned int reg = 0;

    while (y != 0)
    {
        if (y & 1)
        {
            reg += x;
        }
        x <<= 1;
        y >>= 1;
    }
    return reg;
}
3

You'd factor the multiplicand into powers of 2.
3*17 = 3*(16+1) = 3*16 + 3*1 ... = 0011b << 4 + 0011b

2
  • If this approach is used, doesn't that mean that multiplying a number by (2^n)-1 would be the most work for a processor?
    – user4531029
    Sep 24 '16 at 20:23
  • One might ask himself how to get the splitted powers of 2 in an easy way... This is what stackoverflow.com/a/28158393/6280369 does... so in addition given answer: 3*17 = ??? => 17 = b10001 = 16*1 + 8*0 + 4*0 +2*0 +1*1 => 3*17 = 1*1*3 + 0*2*3+0*4*3+0*8*3+1*16*3 (multiplying by powers of 2 is easy: shifting left 'power' times, simply said add a zero) = 1*3 + 1*3*2*2*2*2 = b11 + b110000 = b110011 = 3 + 48 = 51
    – WiRa
    Nov 16 '18 at 8:43
3
public static int multi(int x, int y){
        boolean neg = false;
        if(x < 0 && y >= 0){
            x = -x;
            neg = true;
        }
        else if(y < 0 && x >= 0){
            y = -y;
            neg = true;
        }else if( x < 0 && y < 0){
            x = -x;
            y = -y;
        }

        int res = 0;
        while(y!=0){
            if((y & 1) == 1) res += x;
            x <<= 1;
            y >>= 1;
        }
        return neg ? (-res) : res;
    }
1

I believe this should be a left shift. 8 is 2^3, so left shift 3 bits:

2 << 3 = 8

1
  • 9
    Shouldn't it be 2 << 3 = 16? 2 = 00000010, therefore, if you left shift the number '2' three times you would get 00010000 = 16 (not 8). Oct 5 '15 at 2:55
0
-(int)multiplyNumber:(int)num1 withNumber:(int)num2
{
    int mulResult =0;
    int ithBit;

    BOOL isNegativeSign = (num1<0 && num2>0) || (num1>0 && num2<0)   ;
    num1 = abs(num1);
    num2 = abs(num2);


    for(int i=0;i<sizeof(num2)*8;i++)
    {
        ithBit =  num2 & (1<<i);
        if(ithBit>0){
            mulResult +=(num1<<i);
        }

    }

    if (isNegativeSign) {
        mulResult =  ((~mulResult)+1 );
    }

    return mulResult;
}
0

I have just realized that this is the same answer as the previous one. LOL sorry.

public static uint Multiply(uint a, uint b)
{
   uint c = 0;
   while(b > 0)
   {
      c += ((b & 1) > 0) ? a : 0;
      a <<= 1;
      b >>= 1;
   }
   return c;
}
1
  • 2
    Welcome to Stack Overflow. If this is a duplicate answer then you can help manage the site by deleting your own post
    – Alex S
    Aug 20 '15 at 19:39
0

I was working on a recursive multiplication problem without the * operator and came up with a solution that was informed by the top answer here.

I thought it was worth posting because I really like the explanation in the top answer here, but wanted to expand on it in a way that:

  1. Had a function representation.
  2. Handled cases where your "remainder" was arbitrary.

This only handles positive integers, but you could wrap it in a check for negatives like some of the other answers.

def rec_mult_bitwise(a,b):
    # Base cases for recursion
    if b == 0:
        return 0
    if b == 1:
        return a

    # Get the most significant bit and the power of two it represents
    msb = 1
    pwr_of_2 = 0
    while True:
        next_msb = msb << 1
        if next_msb > b:
            break
        pwr_of_2 += 1
        msb = next_msb
        if next_msb == b:
            break

    # To understand the return value, remember:
    # 1: Left shifting by the power of two is the same as multiplying by the number itself (ie x*16=x<<4)
    # 2: Once we've done that, we still need to multiply by the remainder, hence b - msb
    return (a << pwr_of_2) + rec_mult_bitwise(a, b - msb)

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