6

I am reading the definitive guide to django and am in Chapter 4 on template inheritance. It seems that I am not doing something as elegant as should be possible as I am having to duplicate some code for the context to appear when calling the child view. Here is the code in views.py:

def homepage(request):
    current_date = datetime.datetime.now()
    current_section = 'Temporary Home Page'
    return render_to_response("base.html", locals())
def contact(request):
    current_date = datetime.datetime.now()
    current_section = 'Contact page'
    return render_to_response("contact.html", locals())

It seems redundant to have to include the current_date line in each function.

Here is the base html file that homepage calls:

<html lang= "en">
<head>
    <title>{% block title %}Home Page{% endblock %}</title>
</head>
<body>
    <h1>The Site</h1>
    {% block content %}
        <p> The Current section is {{ current_section }}.</p>
    {% endblock %}

    {% block footer %}
    <p>The current time is {{ current_date }}</p>
    {% endblock %}
</body>
</html>

and a child template file:

{% extends "base.html" %}

{% block title %}Contact{% endblock %}

{% block content %}
<p>Contact information goes here...</p>
    <p>You are in the section {{ current_section }}</p>
{% endblock %}

If I don't include the current_date line when calling the child file, where that variable should appear is blank.

3 Answers 3

16

You can pass a variable to every template by using a Context Processor:

1. Adding the context processor to your settings file

First, you will need to add your custom Context Processor to your settings.py:

# settings.py

TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS = (
    'myapp.context_processors.default', # add this line
    'django.core.context_processors.auth', 
)

From that you can derive that you will need to create a module called context_processors.py and place it inside your app's folder. You can further see that it will need to declare a function called default (as that's what we included in settings.py), but this is arbitrary. You can choose whichever function name you prefer.

2. Creating the Context Processor

# context_processors.py

from datetime import datetime
from django.conf import settings  # this is a good example of extra
                                  # context you might need across templates
def default(request):
    # you can declare any variable that you would like and pass 
    # them as a dictionary to be added to each template's context:
    return dict(
        example = "This is an example string.",
        current_date = datetime.now(),                
        MEDIA_URL = settings.MEDIA_URL, # just for the sake of example
    )

3. Adding the extra context to your views

The final step is to process the additional context using RequestContext() and pass it to the template as a variable. Below is a very simplistic example of the kind of modification to the views.py file that would be required:

# old views.py
def homepage(request):
    current_date = datetime.datetime.now()
    current_section = 'Temporary Home Page'
    return render_to_response("base.html", locals())

def contact(request):
    current_date = datetime.datetime.now()
    current_section = 'Contact page'
    return render_to_response("contact.html", locals())


# new views.py
from django.template import RequestContext

def homepage(request):
    current_section = 'Temporary Home Page'
    return render_to_response("base.html", locals(),
                              context_instance=RequestContext(request))

def contact(request):
    current_section = 'Contact page'
    return render_to_response("contact.html", locals(),
                              context_instance=RequestContext(request))
0
3

So, you can use django.views,generic.simple.direct_to_template instead of render_to_response. It uses RequestContext internaly.

from django.views,generic.simple import direct_to_template

def homepage(request):
    return direct_to_template(request,"base.html",{
        'current_section':'Temporary Home Page'
    })

def contact(request):
    return direct_to_template(request,"contact.html",{
        'current_section':'Contact Page'
    })

Or you can even specify it directly at urls.py such as

urlpatterns = patterns('django.views.generic.simple',
    (r'^/home/$','direct_to_template',{
        'template':'base.html'
        'extra_context':{'current_section':'Temporary Home Page'},        
    }),
    (r'^/contact/$','direct_to_template',{
        'template':'contact.html'
        'extra_context':{'current_section':'Contact page'},        
    }),
2

For django v1.8+ variables returned inside context processor can be accessed.

1. Add the context processor to your TEMPLATES list inside settings.py

TEMPLATES = [
   {
       'BACKEND': 'django.template.backends.django.DjangoTemplates',
       'DIRS': [],
       'APP_DIRS': True,
       'OPTIONS': {
           'context_processors': [
               'django.template.context_processors.debug',
               'django.template.context_processors.request',
               'django.contrib.auth.context_processors.auth',
               'django.contrib.messages.context_processors.messages',

               'your_app.context_processor_file.func_name',  # add this line

           ],
       },
   },
]

2. Create new file for context processor and define method for context

context_processor_file.py

def func_name(request):
  test_var = "hi, this is a variable from context processor"
  return {
    "var_for_template" : test_var,
  }

3. Now you can get the var_for_template in any templates

for example, add this line inside: base.html

<h1>{{ var_for_template }}</h1>  

this will render:

<h1>hi, this is a variable from context processor</h1>

for updating templates to django 1.8+ follow this django doc

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